Friday, March 31, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 31, 1812 - Congress Recommends Indiana Wait Until Population Reaches 35,000

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 31, 1812 - Congress Recommends Indiana Wait Until Population Reaches 35,000
The Northwest Ordinance provided that when a territory reached a population of 60,000 it was eligible to petition for statehood. By 1811, the Indiana territory had reached 24,000. In December 1811, the Territorial assembly petitioned Congress for statehood, requesting that the population requirement be lowered.  On March 31, 1812, Congress, after studying the matter, recommended that the territory wait until the population reached 35,000. Statehood would have to wait.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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© Paul Wonning

Thursday, March 30, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 30, 1867 - First Lynching in Jackson County

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 30, 1867 - First Lynching in Jackson County
In the late 1860's the dreaded Reno gang terrorized Jackson County. Robbery, train robberies and other crimes had infected the surrounding population with fear. An August 3, 1865 newspaper column declared that only "lynch law" could bring order back to the county.
Rape and Murder
On December 30, 1866 miscreants raped and murdered Marian Cutlor. She had lived alone near the small village of Clearspring, in Jackson County. The authorities had arrested three men, John Brooks, Jack Eastin and John Talley. Previous to the crime, court authorities had released the Reno gang from jail for lack of evidence for their role in an 1866 train robbery. Vigilantes from the surrounding countryside decided that those accused of raping and murdering Marian Cutlor would pay for their crimes, as it appeared to them that law enforcement was not up to the task. On the night of March 30, 1867 a crowd of about 250 men gathered. They rode to the Brownstown jail. A group of them went into the jail and battered the door down, removed Brooks and Talley and took them to a large tree. After stringing ropes over two big limbs, the men hung them. The first sentence under "lynch law" had been carried out in Jackson County.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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© Paul Wonning

Wednesday, March 29, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 29, 1984 NFL Colts Arrive in Indianapolis

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 29, 1984 NFL Colts Arrive in Indianapolis
Two long-term events came together in the early morning hours of March 29, 1984 when the Mayflower vans arrived in downtown Indianapolis, Indiana bringing with them the city's long time sought after NFL franchise. The city of Indianapolis' long-term program of downtown revitalization let to the construction of a new stadium in 1983. Robert Irsay, owner of the Baltimore Colts, had held long running negotiations with the city of Baltimore for a new stadium which had not borne fruit. When the state of Maryland threatened to take his team, Irsay loaded his team's equipment on fifteen Mayflower trucks on the night of March 28, 1984 and moved it out of the state.
Indianapolis Renewal
Downtown revitalization for Indianapolis began under the mayor ship of Richard Lugar and continued under his successor William Hudnut. The program kicked off with the opening of a new home for the Indiana Pacers in 1974, Market Square Arena. Between 1974 and 1990 Indianapolis invested about three billion dollars in the downtown area, culminating with the opening of Circle Centre Mall in 1994. To help bolster the city's growing convention business, the city had constructed a new convention center in 1972. To boost its 1,300,000 square feet of convention space, the city constructed the Hoosier Dome in 1983. The Hoosier Dome, later renamed the RCA Dome, connected with the convention center to form one huge convention complex. The secondary purpose of the Hoosier Dome was to attract an NFL franchise.
Irsay and Baltimore Spat
Problems between the Colts and Baltimore had begun in 1972 under then owner Carroll Rosenbloom. Baltimore had announced it would increase the stadium rental fees they charged the Colts. Rosenbloom responded by threatening to move the team if the city did not make revenue enhancing improvements to the stadium. The spat continued after Irsay purchased the team in 1972. Study followed study and proposal followed proposal. Irsay had negotiated with several cities to move the team, including Indianapolis. On March 2, 1984 the NFL voted to allow Irsay to move the team anywhere he wanted. On March 27, 1984 the Maryland Senate passed a bill that would allow Baltimore to seize the team from Irsay. On March 28 Irsay phoned Indianapolis Mayor William Hudnut. The two men finalized a deal. Hudnut phoned Mayflower, which is based in Indiana, and asked the company to help. The owner of the company, a personal friend of the Mayor, complied with the request. During the late night and early morning hours fifteen trucks loaded the equipment and left by different routes to Indiana. The next day the Maryland House of Representatives passed the bill authorizing the use of eminent domain to seize the Colts and the governor signed the bill. But the Colts were gone and there was nothing in Maryland to seize

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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© Paul Wonning

Tuesday, March 28, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 28, 1844 - Railroad Accident at Madison

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 28, 1844 - Railroad Accident at Madison
The steep incline leading down to Madison, Indiana presented a challenge to the men that built the Madison and Indianapolis Railroad. The Madison Hill Incline and Cut on the rail line was among the steepest in the nation. The incline contributed to a deadly railroad accident on March 28, 1844.
Incline and Cut
Construction on the Incline and Cut began on September 16, 1836. The project had its beginnings in the Internal Improvement Act of 1836, which authorized a massive internal works program. Completion o the cut took five years of hard labor by predominantly Irish laborers. The workers moved an estimated 500,000 ton of rock and earth. This included from forty to 125 feet of limestone bedrock. The first train ride up the incline was on November 3, 1841.
Steep Incline
The steepness of the incline was too much for any railroad locomotive at the time, so trains had to be pulled up the incline by teams of horses.
The Accident
The passenger train included passenger cars and a loaded wood car, the wood used as fuel for the steam-powered locomotive. As was usual, the rail workers detached the wood car, and then lowered the passenger car with the horses. After the passenger car was down, they disembarked from the train at the station and loaded more passengers. During the disembarking and reloading of passengers, the locomotive and wood car were brought to the head of the incline to await the return of the passenger car. The wood car broke away as the passenger car descended. The wood car struck the passenger car at a high rate of speed, splintering the car and scattering the passengers. Four were killed and several hurt badly in the accident.
Portions of this article are excerpted from the author’s book:
Exploring Indiana’s Historic Sites, Markers & Museums

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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© Paul Wonning

Monday, March 27, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 27, 1871 - Scottsburg Indiana Platted

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 27, 1871 - Scottsburg Indiana Platted
The Indiana General Assembly formed Scott County, using portions of Jackson, Jennings, Jefferson, Clark, and Washington Counties to make the new county. The county takes its name from General Charles Scott, Governor of Kentucky. The county organized on February 1, 1820.
General Charles Scott (April 1739 – October 22, 1813)
Son of Samuel Scott, Charles Scott was born in Virginia. His mother's name is lost to history. She probably died when he was about six and his father died when he was sixteen. He received a basic education and enlisted in the Virginia Regiment after his father died.
Military Career
He served during the French and Indian War under George Washington. He saw action at Braddock's Defeat and other actions, rising to captain before he left the military. When hostilities broke out in the early stages of the Revolutionary War, Scott raised a company of men. The Virginia Assembly eventually created two regiments, with Scott's becoming the 2nd Virginia. The men of his company elected him lieutenant colonel. The 2nd Virginia joined the Continental Army in 1776. Congress commissioned him as a brigadier general in 1777. During the Charlestown campaign in 1780, the British captured him. They ransomed him out in 1782. At war's end, he was discharged on September 30, 1783.
Settlement in Kentucky
In 1787, he settled near Versailles Kentucky. He also played a role in the formation of the Legion of the United States that fought battles during the Indian Wars late in the Eighteenth Century. The Legion was in existence from 1792 until 1796. In 1808, the voters of Kentucky elected him the fourth governor of the state.
Scottsburg, Indiana Designated New County Seat
Lexington served as the first county seat; however, it was in the eastern portion of the county. During the time Scott County was formed, roads were poor and travel difficult. Thus, the citizens wanted a central location that offered easier access to all the citizens of the county. Henry K. Wardell and William Estill platted Scottsburgh on March 27, 1871. The town takes its name from Colonel Horace Scott, who was the president of the Jeffersonville, Madison and Indianapolis Railroad that went through town. Scottsburg became the new county seat, with the new courthouse finished in 1874. The post office later changed the name to Scottsburg.
This article excerpted from the author’s book:
Exploring Indiana’s Historic Sites, Markers & Museums
http://mossyfeetbooks.blogspot.com/2015/11/blog-post.html
Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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© Paul Wonning

Friday, March 24, 2017

Canals and Rivers Auto Trail

Driving the Canals and Rivers Auto Trail
Driving the Canals and Rivers Auto Trail

Take a wonderful road trip through southeastern Indiana by driving the Canals and Rivers Auto Trail. This delightful auto trail tours through the heart of Franklin and Dearborn Counties. Explore the historic sites of Metamora, Brookville, Lawrenceburg and Aurora, Indiana. Visit the Whitewater Canal State Historic site, then drive along the Whitewater and Ohio Rivers. Tour historic Hillforest Mansion in Aurora, and then return to Metamora through the scenic southeastern Indiana countryside.

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© Paul R. Wonning 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 24, 1913 - Great Flood of 1913 - Record Flooding Across Indiana

March 24, 1913 - Great Flood of 1913 - Record Flooding Across Indiana
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

The morning of March 24 began with tornados and heavy winds that reached over fifty miles per hour. The winds ripped roofs off buildings and downed trees. By evening torrential rains developed that would total over eight inches in some areas. Ground still stiff with winter's frost sloughed off the rain, casting it into the rivers. The Wabash, White and Ohio Rivers spilled over their banks. By evening on the twenty-fourth, the waters reached near the top of the levees.
Fort Wayne Hardest Hit
The floodwaters breached the levees at Fort Wayne by March 25. The rains continued to fall and the floodwaters continued to rise. The floodwaters forced the mayor to shut down the water system, eliminating the people's source of drinking water. They would have to boil floodwaters to have water to drink. No drinking water was actually the least of their problems. The floodwaters flooded homes and businesses. The flood forced the electric utilities to shut down and destroyed large sections of railroad track. Damage to rail lines and roads left many communities with no access to the outside world for weeks. By March 26, the storms had stopped and the waters began receding. Seven people died in the floods and 15,000 were homeless. Businesses and homeowners suffered property damage of almost five million dollars.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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© Paul Wonning

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Parke County Covered Bridge Auto Trails

Parke County Covered Bridge Auto Trails
Parke County Covered Bridge Auto Trails

Explore the covered bridges and peaceful rural countryside of beautiful Parke County, Indiana. This wonderful region has over thirty historic covered bridges preserved for visitors to see. Parke County Covered Bridge Auto Trails includes the history of not only the bridges, but many of the men that built them as well. Anyone that anticipates visiting this beautiful area will want to read Parke County Covered Bridge Auto Trails and take it with them as they enjoy the wonderful Parke County, Indiana countryside.

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Amazon Softbound
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Paul Wonning's Books on Amazon Page
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Paul Wonning's Books on Apple
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Paul Wonning's Books on Barnes and Noble

© Paul R. Wonning 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 23, 1823 - Schyler Colfax Born

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 23, 1823 - Schyler Colfax Born
Nicknamed "Smiler" because of his perennial good nature, Colfax served in the United States House of Representatives as Speaker. He became the first Speaker to gain election to the Vice Presidency of the United States. Political scandal almost cost him the Vice-Presidency and did end his political career before he reached the apex of politics, the Presidency.
Born in New York
Bank Teller Schyler Colfax, Sr. and Hannah Stryker conceived their child Schyler in New York City. Schyler Sr. died of tuberculosis five months before Schyler Jr. was born. By age ten the boy worked as a retail clerk to help with the family finances while attending school. His mother married George W. Matthews. Matthews moved his new family to Indiana, settling in New Carlisle. Schyler worked in his stepfathers store as a boy, reading newspapers on a barrel during slow times. He continued his education by borrowing books from whoever would loan them to him.
Start in Politics
In 1841, his family moved to South Bend and his father gained election as county auditor. Schyler gained his first political experience when his stepfather hired him as his deputy. When he was sixteen, Schyler wrote a letter to Horace Greeley and offered to write political articles for the New-York Tribune. Greeley accepted the offer and Schyler began both his newspaper career and his life-long friendship with Greeley. He moved into politics in 1848 by serving as the Whig delegate to the Indiana convention. He then gained election to the convention that wrote the new Indiana Constitution of 1851. The Whigs chose him to run for Congress in 1851, an election that he narrowly lost. The Whig party disintegrated during this time and for a few years, the political scene was a disorganized mess. Schyler ran for Congress again in 1854 on the Indiana People's Party's slate. He won but when he arrived in Congress, there was much confusion as to who belonged to what party. Eventually the Republican Party emerged, forming an anti-slavery coalition of Whigs, Democrats and Know-Nothings. Schyler joined this new Republican Party.
Speaker of the House
Schyler served in the House in various capacities until 1862, when he became Speaker. This post he served well in during the tumultuous years of the Civil War and the following Reconstruction period. His political stature grew and in 1868, the Republican delegates chose him to run with Ulysses S. Grant as Vice President. The ticket won that election, but this would prove to be the apex of a career that Colfax had hoped would lead to the Presidency.
The Credit Mobilier Scandal
The Credit Mobilier Company underwrote the costs associated with building the Union Pacific Railroad. Dependent upon federal subsidies, the company distributed stock to influential Congressmen. Colfax proved to be one of those Congressmen. The scandal broke while Colfax served as Vice President. The resulting scandal almost resulted in his impeachment. At the end of his term, he retired back to Indiana to become a successful lecturer.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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© Paul Wonning

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 22, 1800 - First Mail Route Between Vincennes and Jeffersonville

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 22, 1800 - First Mail Route Between Vincennes and Jeffersonville
Buffalo Trace
Natural salt licks in what is now northern Kentucky in current Bone Lick State Park drew buffalo from the regions now known as the states of Indiana and Illinois. These buffalo migrated by the thousands over hundreds of years over the same route, forming a wide pathway that the early colonists called the Buffalo Trace.
Salt Licks
Salt licks are places on the earth's surface where naturally occurring salts and mineral become exposed. Animals need these salts and come to them to lick the deposits. There are many mineral licks located across the Midwest, but the best ones were in Kentucky at Big Bone Lick State Park.
Big Bone Lick State Park
Located in northern Kentucky, Big Bone Lick State Park is a natural destination for those seeking to understand the bison that migrated across Indiana and Illinois to lick the mineral deposits exposed in the swampy ground at the park. The licks have existed for millennia, attracting the giant mammoths and other mammals that inhabited North America during the Ice Age. As these animals became extinct, the smaller animals came. Bison, deer and other animals went there in large numbers to lick the minerals from the ground. For more information, contact:
Big Bone Lick State Historic Site
3380 Beaver Road
Union, KY 41091
(859) 384-3522
The Buffalo Trace
The Buffalo Trace began in the prairies of Illinois as the herds of buffalo headed east toward the licks. It crossed the Wabash River near the site of Vincennes, Indiana, providing the French with an ideal spot to establish the trading post that became the city. It crossed southern Indiana, nearing the Ohio River at its shallowest point, the Falls of the Ohio. After crossing the river, the bison traveled across northern Kentucky until they reached the area of the licks. In places, the Trace was up to twenty feet wide. Amerindians used the trace to both hunt the bison and travel cross-country. Since it connected the Ohio, Wabash and Mississippi Rivers the trace provided a highway for the white settlers that wished to go west. Today portions of U. S. 150 follow the Trace, which is now part of the National Scenic Byways Program.
The Postal Route
United States Postmaster General Joseph Habersham established a postal route over the Trace on March 22, 1800. Mail carriers would carry mail over the route every four weeks in the beginning. This was the first Western mail route in the fledgling nation. Two men carried the mail on foot over the 130 mile route.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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© Paul Wonning

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 21, 1854 - St. Meinrads Abbey Established

St. Meinrads Abbey
St. Meinrads Abbey 

March 21, 1854 - St. Meinrads Abbey Established
Father Joseph Kundek invited monks from the Einsiedeln Abbey in Switzerland to come to Indiana to serve the needs of local Catholics. The monks responded to the call, establishing St. Meinrads as a school for Catholic children. It would also serve as a school to prepare men for the priesthood.
St. Meinrads Abbey
St. Meinrads Abbey 

A Visit to the Land of Lincoln, Indiana
A Visit to the Land of Lincoln, Indiana
Father Joseph Kundek (January 21, 1809 - December 4, 1857)
A native of Ivanic, Croatia, Father Kundek attended Catholic school at the Gymnasium in Zagreb. Bishop Alagovic of Croatia admitted him to the diocesan school of theology. After his ordination in August 1833, Father Kundek decided to migrate to America to serve the needs of the growing German Catholic population in the Midwest. After studying German for a year in Vienna, Austria, he departed Europe on the ship Alliance on June 8, 1838. He arrived in Vincennes, Indiana on August 7, 1838. Since the Vincennes diocese ministered to only a few Germans, the bishop of Vincennes, Bishop Brute, sent him to Jasper, Indiana, a growing German town. Father Kundek established the Jasper mission on September 28, 1838. By the end of 1839, he established the town of Ferdinand and founded a church there. To minister the needs of the Catholics in southern Indiana his ministerial route covered 700 miles as he traveled between towns. Through letters to his European contacts, he encouraged Catholic to move into the area and by his efforts; thousands of German Catholics migrated into the Jasper area over his lifetime.
St. Meinrads Stained Glass Window
St. Meinrads Stained Glass Window

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
St. Meinrads
The monks named the Abbey after St. Meinrad, a Ninth Century monk that lived in Einsiedeln, Switzerland. Known as the "Martyr of Hospitality," he lived as a hermit and solicited gifts from wealthy patrons, which he passed on to the poor. Thieves killed him in 861 to get the gifts he kept at his shrine. The monks that established St. Meinrads began teaching school classes shortly after their arrival. By 1861 the expanded their offerings to include courses in theology and philosophy. Today is one of two arch abbeys in the United States and nine in the world.
To visit St. Meinrad, contact:
Saint Meinrad Archabbey
200 Hill Drive
St. Meinrad, Indiana 47577
812-357-6611
800-581-6905

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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© Paul Wonning

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 15, 1957 - Indiana Adopts Peony as State Flower

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 15, 1957 - Indiana Adopts Peony as State Flower
The peony became the fourth state flower adopted by the Indiana legislature on March 15, 1957. It followed the carnation, the tulip tree, and the zinnia.
Carnation as State Flower
The Indiana legislature chose the Carnation as the Indiana State Flower on March 15, 1913. Since the carnation is not native to Indiana, many protested the decision. So, the legislature deposed the carnation ten years later.
The Tulip Tree as State Flower
In 1923 the Legislature adopted the blossom of the tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), also called yellow, or tulip, poplar. The tulip tree is a beautiful flower, and a native tree. However, the blossoms are borne high in the tree canopy, making them hard to see. Thus, in 1931 the legislature made the tulip tree the state tree, instead, and crowned the zinnia as the third Indiana State Flower.
The Zinnia as Indiana State Flower
The zinnia reigned supreme in state gardens for twenty-four years. In 1957, the legislature once again took up the subject of the State Flower. Unverified rumors persist that commercial seed producer that grew zinnia seeds helped nudge the zinnia into the role.
The Peony as State Flower
On March 15, 1957, the legislature deposed the zinnia, crowning the peony, instead. Once again, rumors circulate about politics playing a role in the decision. The legislature reportedly had been considering the dogwood blossom, which is native to Indiana, as the state flower. However, a large commercial peony grower managed to substitute the peony, a native of Asia, instead. At any rate, the peony has reigned as the State Flower of Indiana ever since.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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© Paul Wonning

Tuesday, March 14, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 14, 1850 - Ossian Indiana Incorporated

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 14, 1850 - Ossian Indiana Incorporated
Named after a legendary Scottish poet, town officials incorporated the town of Ossian on March 14, 1850.
Town Founded
William Craig, John Ogden and Squire LaFever laid out the town that would become Ossian in 1846. Town officially named the town Ossian after the Scottish poet. The post office, which had been called Bee Creek, became the Ossian Post Office. The Fort Wayne and Bluffton Plank Road Company built a plank toll road connecting Ossian with Bluffton and Fort Wayne in 1850. The Fort Wayne, Cincinnati & Louisville Railroad went through the town in 1869. The town is located on Indiana State Road 1, southwest of Fort Wayne between I-469 and US 224. The town of just over 3000 residents has developed into an industrial city with about 25% of its jobs in manufacturing.
Ossian
According to accounts by Scottish poet James McPherson, he traveled to Scotland in 1760. While there, he collected oral poems in Gaelic from Scottish narrators. The narrators claimed that the oral poems were ancient in origin. McPherson translated the poems and published them, beginning in 1760 and ending in 1765. The poems became popular across the world. Controversy over the authenticity of the poems has swirled around the academic world ever since.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
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© Paul Wonning

Monday, March 13, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 13, 1946 - World's Largest Egg Appeared on Metone Courthouse Lawn

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 13, 1946 - World's Largest Egg Appeared on Metone Courthouse Lawn
As the home of major egg producers, Metone Indiana considers itself the "Egg Basket of the Midwest." To celebrate its success with eggs, the Metone Chamber of Commerce stages the annual Egg Festival each year in early June. In 1946, Hugh Rickel of Palestine, Indiana built the twelve-foot tall egg to promote the Egg Festival.
Metone
Surveyors platted this city of 1000 residents in 1882. It is located in Kosciusko County in northern Indiana. The town probably takes its name from Metone, France. Metone is on Indiana State Road 19 about ten miles from its intersection with US 6. The intersection is between Nappanee and Bremen, Indiana. The Lawrence D. Bell Aircraft Museum (574) 353-7318) also resides at 210 S Oak Street in Metone.
Egg Festival
Begun in 1946 to celebrate the town's egg production heritage the Egg Festival is a three-day celebration that the Chamber of Commerce hosts each year in early June. The events include a parade, flea market and craft show, baby contest and the Miss Chick and Mr. Rooster Contest. The event also has a car show.
World's Largest Egg
The manager of the Northern Indiana CO-OP Association, Ed Ward, came up with the idea of the huge egg and approached Hugh Rickel about building it. Rickell, a sheet metal worker, welded a framework together of steel rods. Workers then plastered concrete over the framework after which Harry Meredith painted it. The completed egg weighed in at over 3000 pounds and stands twelve foot tall. When complete twelve men loaded the egg on a truck and transported it to the Metone Courthouse lawn. No one knows exactly when they placed the egg on the lawn, but the March 13, 1946 edition of the Mentone CO-OP News had the photo on the cover. At the conclusion of the 1946, Egg Festival officials returned the egg to the Northern Indiana CO-OP Association. Company official had no clue what to do with the egg until the CO-OP donated the land at Main and Morgan streets. Workers moved the egg there and there is where it sits today.
For more information on Metone and the Egg Festival, contact:
Metone Chamber of Commerce
105 East Main St.
Mentone, IN 46539
(574) 353-7417
valleyrs11@frontier.com

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
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© Paul Wonning

Friday, March 10, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 10, 1853 - Medical College Opened in Madison, Indiana

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 10, 1853 - Medical College Opened in Madison, Indiana
Dr. Charles Schussler opened Madison Medical Institute on March 10, 1853. Due to a severe cholera epidemic that raged in southern Indiana, the school closed after three months.
Charles Schussler (December 28, 1807 – September 20, 1874)
A native of Stuttgart, Germany Dr. Schussler attended Universities at Tubingen and Vienna. He moved to New York in 1828 and opened a drug store in New York. From New York, he emigrated to Texas, then to New Orleans. Finally, he moved to Madison and opened a medical practice. He lived at 514 Jefferson Street, where he lived until his death in 1874.
At the beginning of the Civil War, Dr. Schussler enlisted in the army as a Surgeon on September 20, 1861. He mustered out of the army on September 22, 1864 at Chattanooga, Tennessee. His wife, Magdalena Schussler passed away in 1874.  The couple had five children. Their graves are at Springdale Cemetery in Madison. Their home was the site of Schussler Bed And Breakfast until it closed.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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Thursday, March 9, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - Indiana Farmers' Institute Act Passed

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 9, 1889 - Indiana Farmers' Institute Act Passed
The passage of the Indiana Farmers' Institute Act provided legal recognition for the many agricultural educational programs that Purdue University had run across the state during previous years. It also provided the framework for later laws that established the Purdue Extension Service, the 4-H program and many other agricultural programs Purdue has established over the ensuing years.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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© Paul Wonning

Wednesday, March 8, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 08, 1915 - Indiana Historical Commission Created

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 08, 1915 - Indiana Historical Commission Created
Indiana became a state on December 11, 1816. On December 11, 1916, the state would celebrate its centennial. In preparation of the milestone, the Indiana State Legislature established the Indiana Historical Commission to plan festivities for the event.
Indiana Historical Commission
During the first one hundred years of its history, the state of Indiana had weathered many storms. It created a new state capital from scratch with the establishment of Indianapolis in 1821. The state survived the financial crises precipitated by the Mammoth Internal Improvement Act of 1836. Indiana weathered the storm created by the rigors of raising troops and the internal strife from the Civil War. It built two state capitols. It endured Black Day of the Indiana General Assembly and managed control the ravages of John Dillenger. It built canals, railroads, highways and colleges. In a short one hundred years, the state of Indiana had thrived after weathering many storms. When the State's centennial celebration approached, the state's leaders decided it was time to party. So they established the Indiana Historical Commission to plan the many events related to the historic event.
The Centennial Celebration
The lasting effects of the Centennial Celebration include the beginnings of the Indiana State Park system, improved highways and the building of many permanent memorials throughout the state. Hundreds of events took place all over the state culminating with the weeklong Pageant of Indiana in Indianapolis.
Indiana Historical Bureau
In 1925, the Assembly created the Indiana Historical Bureau from the Commission. The Bureau is charged with listing of historical markers, plaques, and public memorials.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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© Paul Wonning

Tuesday, March 7, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 7, 1823 - First Issue Western Censor and Emigrants Guide

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 7, 1823 - First Issue Western Censor and Emigrants Guide
The first lots in Indianapolis went on sale in October 1821. Before the state capital took up residence in the growing city, the second newspaper in Indianapolis began publication on March 7, 1823.
Western Censor and Emigrants Guide
The Western Censor and Emigrants Guide's publishers were Douglas Maguire and Harvey Gregg.  The weekly newspaper was decidedly political; the Whig party was the political party of choice. The newspaper opposed Democratic Presidential candidate Andrew Jackson. Gregg sold his interest in the newspaper in on October 29, 1924 to John Douglass. The newspaper continued publication under the name Western Censor and Emigrants Guide when the publishers changed the name to Indiana Journal on January 11, 1825.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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© Paul Wonning

Monday, March 6, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 6, 1865 - Indiana Accepts Provisions of Morrill Land Grant Act

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 6, 1865 - Indiana Accepts Provisions of Morrill Land Grant Act
Championed by Vermont Representative Justin Smith Morrill, Congress passed the Morrill Land-Grant Colleges Act in 1862. President Abraham Lincoln signed the law on July 2, 1862. The law established land-grant colleges in the states that accepted the terms.
Justin Smith Morrill (April 14, 1810 – December 28, 1898)
A native of Strafford, Vermont, Morrill attended common school as a child. He worked as a merchant as a young man, first in Maine and then back in Stafford. He served in several local elective offices. He was successful in several business ventures and retired as a gentleman farmer in the late 1840's. He became involved in politics, gaining election to Congress as a Whig in 1854. He became one of the founders of the Republican Party and won reelection to Congress as a Republican five times. In 1867, he was elected to the Senate as a Republican.
Morrill Land-Grant Acts
Congress first passed the act in 1859, but President James Buchanan vetoed it. After the start of the Civil War, supporters revived the act and resubmitted it. Congress passed the act and President Abraham Lincoln signed it on July 2, 1862. The act encouraged land-grant colleges that would teach military tactics, engineering and agriculture.
Land-Grant Colleges
Under the provisions of the act, each qualifying state would receive 30,000 acres of Federal land for the establishment of a college. This land would be either in the state or on land contiguous to it. The states could use this land, or proceeds from its sale, to establish a college in the fields described above. Each state would receive grants equal in number to the total number of congressional members allotted to that state as per the Census of 1860. The act specifically forbade states in active rebellion from participating in the terms of the act. Congress did extend the provisions to the former Confederate states after the war concluded.
Indiana Accepts the Provisions of the Act
The Indiana General Assembly accepted the provisions of the act on March 6, 1865. The state designated Purdue University as a land-grant college in 1869.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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© Paul Wonning

Sunday, March 5, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 4, 1877 - Act Passed Authorizing Construction of Current Indiana Capitol

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 4, 1877 - Act Passed Authorizing Construction of Current Indiana Capitol
The current Indiana capitol building that graces downtown Indianapolis is the fifth capitol to house the legislature in the state. The act authorizing the construction of the building to replace the previous capitol passed the Indiana legislature on March 4, 1877.
The Fifth Capitol Building
The first capitol building, called the Red House, met in Vincennes from 1805 until 1813, when it moved to Corydon, Indiana to the new capitol there. The legislature used the Corydon building until it moved to Indianapolis in 1825. The Legislature used the Marion County Courthouse as the third capitol until workers completed construction of the fourth capitol building in 1835. The legislature met in this building until it became unsafe in 1877 and the legislature moved to a state office building constructed in 1865. The legislature met in this office building from 1877 until the workers completed the current capitol in 1888.
Unsafe
The capitol built in 1835 proved to be inadequate in both size and quality of construction. By the late 1860's the building's foundation began to fail. Many feared the building would collapse. A ceiling collapse in 1867 proved these fears credible. Legislators first debated the feasibility of saving the structure in 1873, but most felt this was not possible. By 1876, the legislature moved out of the deteriorating structure and into the state office buildings and the Marion County Courthouse. They had the building condemned and razed.
A New Capitol
The legislature passed legislation approving the construction of a new building. Workers would construct the new building on the site of the old one at a cost not to exceed two million dollars. Construction began in 1880.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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© Paul Wonning

Saturday, March 4, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 5, 1951 - Bill Authorizing the Indiana University School of Optometry Signed

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 5, 1951 - Bill Authorizing the Indiana University School of Optometry Signed
Until 1951, Indiana had no optometry school. That changed when Indiana Governor Henry F. Schricker signed a bill authorizing a school of Optometry for Indiana University on March 5, 1951.
Discussions and Denial
Optometrists began discussing the need for a school of optometry in the late 1930's. The Indiana State Board of Optometry joined the effort and by 1944, they met with Indiana University President Herman B Wells to discuss the concept. He requested that the Indiana State Board of Optometry organize a committee to explore a school at IU. Indiana State Board of Optometry President Edgar Cain garnered support from Indiana optometrists and petitioned the Indiana University Board of Trustees to approve a school. The Indiana University Medical School opposed the idea and the Trustees denied the request.
The Indiana General Assembly Steps In
The Indiana State Board of Optometry next approached the Indiana General Assembly. The Assembly approved the bill on March 1, 1951. By autumn 1951, the school began   two-year pre-optometry classes and three years of professional optometry courses. The first group of classes graduated in 1956.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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© Paul Wonning

Friday, March 3, 2017

March 3, 1813 - Thomas Posey Becomes Second Governor of Indiana Territory

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 3, 1813 - Thomas Posey Becomes Second Governor of Indiana Territory
William Henry Harrison resigned as governor of the Indiana Territory on December 28, 1812 to pursue a military career against the Amerindian tribes in the Northwest Territory. President James Madison appointed Thomas Posey governor on March 3, 1813, disappointing many members of the Indiana Territorial assembly who wanted the new governor to be a northerner that opposed slavery.
Thomas Posey (July 9, 1750 – March 19, 1818)
The details of Thomas Posey's parentage are uncertain. Historians know that he was native to a farm on the banks of the Potomac River near Mount Vernon. Rumors persist that he was the illegitimate son of George Washington, however no one has ever been able to either prove or disprove it. We know little of his early childhood except that George Washington Thomas enjoyed George Washington’s patronage as a child.
Education and Early Adulthood
His education was that of a typical pioneer child. His formal education, as such, was limited. At nineteen, he enlisted in the Virginia militia where he fought against the native tribes. When the Revolutionary War broke out, Posey enlisted in the Continental Army. His service included Valley Forge, the Battle of Monmouth, and siege of Yorktown.
After the War
Posey returned to Virginia after resigning from the army. He ran unsuccessfully for the House of Representatives in 1797 and reentered the Army as a Brigadier general. Disturbed by suspected malfeasance by General James Wilkinson, Posey resigned in 1794. As a reward for his military service, the United States Government awarded him 7000 acres of land. He chose land near Henderson, Kentucky and promptly gained election to the Kentucky State Senate in 1804. He ran for governor of Kentucky in 1808, but withdrew to support another candidate. He rejoined the army and successfully organized a 100,000-militia force gathered in preparation for a possible war with the French and British. He resigned his commission once again to move to Louisiana. The Louisiana governor appointed him to the United States Senate, where he served until 1813. During his term, he assisted the Acting Secretary of War.
New Governor of Indiana Territory
During the interim between Harrison's resignation and Posey taking the helm, the Territorial Assembly approved the move from Vincennes to Corydon. Posey's health was deteriorating during these years and he disliked the small town that now served as Indiana's capital. He spent most of his term living in Jeffersonville, near the Louisville doctors. The Legislature disapproved of his pro-slavery stance and considered him aristocratic. His opposition to statehood for the Indiana Territory in 1816 did not help him among those that favored it. The achievement of Statehood status for Indiana came with his opposition and most do not consider him instrumental to it in any way. His biggest achievement was the reorganization of the Territory's courts.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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© Paul Wonning

Thursday, March 2, 2017

March 2, 1827 - Congress Grants Land for Wabash and Erie Canal

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 2, 1827 - Congress Grants Land for Wabash and Erie Canal
In the dawning years of the Nineteenth Century, the quest for fast, cheap transportation of freight over long distances seemed in reach with the construction and economic success of the Erie Canal. The Erie Canal connected New York City with the Great Lakes. It spurred New York's growth as a major commercial center. It also provided encouragement more canal construction across the United States. Landlocked states like Indiana seized on canals as the answer to open markets in inland cities that lacked navigable rivers. The Wabash and Erie was the first of these projects tackled by Indiana.
The Proposed Canal
The proposed canal was a grand project. It would span 468 miles across Indiana and Ohio, connecting it the Erie Canal via the Great Lakes with Evansville on the Ohio River. The Wabash and Erie actually consisted of four main canals, the Miami and Erie Canal, the Wabash and Erie Canal, the Cross Cut Canal and the Central Canal.
Miami and Erie Canal
The 274-mile Miami and Erie Canal connected Toledo, Ohio on Lake Erie with Cincinnati, Ohio on the Ohio River. Workers commenced construction in 1825 and finished in 1845. When complete, the canal had 19 aqueducts, three guard locks, 103 canal locks and multiple feeder canals. The canal was profitable, but not as profitable as the state of Ohio hoped. Competition from railroads ended canal commercial operations by 1913.
Wabash and Erie
This canal began at Junction, Ohio and to Terre Haute. Junction received its name because the Wabash and Erie joined the Miami and Erie Canal in the town. The town flourished during the 1840's through the 1850's until the railroads began displacing the canals.
Cross Cut Canal
The Cross Cut Canal continued the Wabash and Erie route from Terre Haute to Worthington, Indiana.
Central Canal
The Central Canal completed the link from Worthington to Evansville. This was the last link completed in 1853.
Construction Begins
Because many credit George Washington with the suggestion that a canal be built through the region, the builders chose the 100th anniversary of his birth as the date to begin construction of the huge enterprise. Thus, on February 22, 1832 construction crews broke ground for the Wabash and Erie Canal.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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© Paul Wonning

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 1, 1784 - Virginia Cedes Claim to Virginia Territory to United States

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 1, 1784 - Virginia Cedes Claim to Virginia Territory to United States
After a legal tug of war and many compromises, Virginia ceded the lands that became the Northwest Territory to the United States. The struggle had imperiled the ratification of the Articles of Confederation and threatened to turn the newly independent colonies into a struggle for land and power. Because of the cession, Maryland became the thirteenth state to ratify the Confederation and set the stage for Congress to form the Northwest Territory and eventual admittance of Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin and Minnesota as states on equal footing with the original thirteen states.
Maryland Stalls Ratification
During the Revolutionary War, the Federal Government ran up debts of almost eight million dollars, a staggering sum for that day. The various States also had debts due to the war. Many of the States held claims to the lands west of the Appalachian Mountains. New York and Virginia had the largest claims. However, Massachusetts, Connecticut, North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia also had extensive holdings. These claims totaled more than 222 million acres, a huge expanse.
Maryland's chief complaint was that these states held a huge advantage over the landless states. This was because they could sell these lands to pay their debts. They felt that landless states like Maryland would have to levy heavy taxes to pay theirs off, stifling their growth.
Maryland feared that land rich states could operate with out any taxes, relying on the sale of these western lands for revenue. Maryland's residents would flee to the tax free states. The impasse lasted almost four years.
Royal Charters
Virginia's claims originated in the second Royal Charter, granted by King James I. In it, he granted Virginia the lands of Maine south to the current North Carolina/South Carolina border. The lands were to extend "from sea to sea, west and northwest." this grant extended all the way to the Pacific Ocean, a staggering expanse of land. Revisions to this grant occurred over the years, but by the time of the Revolution, they still included lands claimed by Pennsylvania, New York and other colonies. When Virginian George Rogers Clark conquered Vincennes, Kaskaskia, Cahokia and other western outposts, he strengthened Virginia's claims to these regions. The Treaty of Paris had cut off the boundaries of the new nation at the Mississippi River. This still left Virginia and the other states with a vast territory to squabble over.
The Compromise
Congress and the states worked tirelessly to resolve the problems. New York, in a show of good faith, abandoned its land claims on January 17, 1780. Virginia followed suit on January 2, 1781, but they laid down conditions under which they would make it official. They wanted the Continental Congress to reimburse Virginia for the cost of George Rogers Clark's expedition, affirm all boundaries, affirm Virginia land claims in the disputed territories and reject all private claims in the cession area. This satisfied Maryland, which ratified the Articles on January 30, 1781. Congress did not accept the conditions, because many of the states still maintained their claims west of the Mississippi River. It took more negotiations to work out the problems and once again, Virginia renewed its offer on October 20, 1783, accepting Congress' recommendations. Congress accepted Virginia's cession on March 1, 1784. They had set the stage for the formation of the Northwest Territory and westward expansion

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
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© Paul Wonning