Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Dearborn Historical Marker East Fork Stone Chapel


Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South East Edition
East Fork Stone Chapel
By Tom Bosse, July 18, 2015
Inscription.
Erected 1821 by early settlers as a Methodist Church on land donated by John Ewbank. Services were held continuously for more than 125 years. Maintained by endowment fund.
 Erected 1966 by Dearborn County Sesquicentennial Committee.

Location. 
39° 11.327' N, 84° 54.244' W.
Marker is in Guilford, Indiana, in Dearborn County.
Marker is on Indiana Route 1 0.1 miles south of E. Fork Road, on the left when traveling north.
Marker is in this post office area: Guilford IN 47022, United States of America.

Brief History
Parishioners used rock from nearby Tanner's Creek to construct this church in 1821. Members held services in the church for 125 years, until the 1940's. John Ewbank lived in the area and used the cemetery as a family plot. The Ewbank family donated the cemetery and the land for the church, thus visitors will find graves older than 1821. The marker is visible from Indiana State Road 1. To access the church go to East Fork Road and turn left, if coming from Lawrenceburg. The cemetery and graveyard are on the west side of the road. East Fork Road loops back to State Road 1, so turning around are not necessary.

Dearborn  Historical Marker East Fork Stone Chapel

Monday, September 26, 2016

Dearborn Historical Marker St. John The Baptist Church

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South East Edition
Dearborn  Historical Marker St. John The Baptist Church

Inscription:
Second Oldest Roman Catholic Church in Indiana. Established 1824. Original log meeting house replaced by frame church in 1842. First brick edifice erected 1847. Present church dedicated October 19, 1879.

Erected 1976 by Dearborn County Bicentennial Committee.

Location. 39° 14.67' N, 84° 56.88' W.
Marker is in Dover, Indiana, in Dearborn County.
Marker is on Indiana Route 1 just south of Sawmill Road, on the left when traveling north.
Marker is in this post office area: Guilford IN 47022, United States of America.

Brief History
Established by Irish Catholics, the congregation formed in 1820 at Dover, and then known as McKenzie's Crossroads, the church was built in 1824. It is the second oldest Catholic parish in Indiana, St. Francis Xavier Cathedral and Library in Vincennes being the oldest. many locals still refer to Dover as "Tipperary." The parishioners built a log church in 1824, which they replaced with a wood frame church in 1842. Missionary priests from Cincinnati, Bardstown in Kentucky and Vincennes visited the flock to tend their needs. The parish officially formed in 1840, when permanent church records began.

Friday, September 23, 2016

General John Morgan - Dearborn County Historical Marker

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South East Edition
General John Morgan - Dearborn County Historical Marker

Indiana (Dearborn County), Dover — General John Morgan
Inscription:
Marched east along this road on Monday, July 13, 1863 in his raid across Southern Indiana.
By Tom Bosse, July 18, 2015
1. General John Morgan Marker
Erected 1927 by Dearborn County Historical Society.
 Location. 39° 14.464' N, 84° 56.846' W.
Marker is in Dover, Indiana, in Dearborn County.
Marker is at the intersection of Indiana Route 1 and North Dearborn Road, on the right when traveling north on State Route 1.
Marker is in this post office area: Guilford IN 47022, United States of America.

Brief History:

Morgan’s Raid (July 8-13, 1863)
Brigadier General John Hunt Morgan, in an effort to draw Union troops away from their campaign in Tennessee, crossed the Ohio River with over 2000 trained and seasoned Confederate troops. Fresh off two raids in Kentucky that rattled Union commanders in the area, he defied orders from his superior General Braxton Bragg, by crossing the Ohio River into Indiana on July 8 and 9, 1863.
John Hunt Morgan (June 1, 1825 – September 4, 1864)
The eldest son of ten children born to Calvin and Henrietta (Hunt) Morgan, John's father migrated to Lexington, Kentucky after the failure of his pharmacy. He attended Transylvania College but the university tossed him out in 1844 for dueling. He enlisted in the Army in 1846 to serve in the Mexican-American War. He had an avid interest in the military and raised a unit in 1852, which the state legislature disbanded. When tensions began rising during the years before the Civil War, he raised another unit in 1857, which he trained well. When war broke out, he did not immediately favor secession. But when the southern states began seceding, he and his men joined the cause. Using his corps of "Lexington Riflemen" as a nucleus, he soon raised a unit, the 2nd Kentucky Cavalry Regiment. This unit fought at the Battle of Shiloh. On July 4, 1862, Morgan launched the first of his Kentucky raids. This successful action resulted in the capture of over a thousand Federal troops and the requisitioning of tons of Union supplies and hundreds of horses. A second series of raids against Union Major General William S. Rosecrans supply lines disrupted the Union troops and created havoc in the Union command in Kentucky. The success of these raids encouraged his foray into Indiana.
The Crossing
Morgan launched his raid from Burkesville, Kentucky, which is near the Tennessee/Kentucky state line. The beginning of this raid coincided with General Lee's Battle of Gettysburg far to the northeast. From Burkesville, the troops rode north to Brandenburg, Kentucky. He had already scouted the Ohio to find suitable places to cross and had settled on this site. His soldiers commandeered two riverboats on July 7 and by the next day; they moved north towards Corydon and the only Civil War battle to occur on Indiana soil.
Visitors can visit the battlefield here:
Battle of Corydon Memorial Park
100 Old Hwy 135 SW
Corydon, IN 47112

After Corydon
Morgan did not rest after his victory at Corydon. He continued east, crossing Harrison, Washington, Scott, Jennings, Jefferson, Ripley and Dearborn counties. Corydon’s townspeople cared for Morgan’s wounded soldiers from the battle, using the old Presbyterian Church as a hospital.
The Indiana portion of the raid has been mapped into an Auto Tour. The John Hunt Morgan Heritage Trail traces the route of Morgan’s Raiders through Indiana as it fled through the countryside into Ohio.
Find out more Morgan's Raiders in Indiana here.

This article excerpted from the author's book;
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South Central Edition


For more on Morgan in Dearborn County, see
Morgan's Raid in Dearborn County

This Day in Indiana History - September 23, 1902 - President Theodore Roosevelt Undergoes Surgery In Indianapolis After Giving Speech

A Day in Indiana History - September
A Day in Indiana History - September
September 23, 1902 - President Theodore Roosevelt Undergoes Surgery In Indianapolis After Giving Speech
President Theodore Roosevelt had begun an eighteen-day speaking tour of Midwestern cities to help elect Republican candidates to Congress during the 1902 off-year elections. A street car accident in Pittsfield, Massachusetts had given him a severe leg injury. By the time the President reached Indianapolis, doctors decided he needed surgery after he gave his scheduled speech.
The Accident
The day of September 3 had dawned bright and beautiful. Roosevelt decided that he wanted to take a carriage ride through the streets to enjoy the city and the day. City officials had ordered the streetcar lines to halt operations as a safety measure. Roosevelt boarded the carriage in company with Massachusetts governor Winthrop M. Crane, his secretary and a Secret Service agent driver. As the carriage rolled peacefully alongside the trolley line that ran down the middle of the street, a streetcar came careening down the street as a high speed. The trolley smacked into the carriage, killing the FBI agent driver, William Craig. Craig was the first Secret Service agent killed in the line of duty. The accident injured Roosevelt's leg and bloodied his face.
Continuing the Tour
The stoic Roosevelt continued the tour, traveling to New York by train, and then to Cincinnati, Ohio. Upon his arrival at Cincinnati, Roosevelt was having trouble standing. At his next stop, in Detroit, he left suddenly left a press conference to go to his hotel room to go to bed. He continued the tour, giving speeches to enthusiastic crowds in Logansport, Indiana and then in Noblesville. By the time he got to Noblesville, it was apparent that he was seriously ill. Noblesville officials notified Indianapolis authorities that Roosevelt needed medical attention, so when he arrived in Indianapolis there were four surgeons waiting to meet him at the train. He managed a brief speech at the Columbia Club on Monument Circle before authorities rushed him to St. Vincent Hospital for surgery.
The Surgery
The abscessed wound had swollen to a lump the size of a man's hand. Roosevelt refused anesthetic for the painful surgery and endured the pain while surgeons scraped and poked the wound until it drained. The doctor had to penetrate the injury three times before he had successfully emptied the pus from the wound. During the procedure, Roosevelt had only asked for a glass of water.
Canceling the Tour
The surgery was a success; however, the doctors advised that he rest for two weeks to recover. Roosevelt canceled the remainder of the tour and returned to Washington DC to recuperate.

Thursday, September 22, 2016

Dillsboro Historical Marker

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South East Edition
Dillsboro Historical Marker

Inscription.
The town was laid out by Mathias Whetstone in 1830, and named for General James Dill, soldier in the War of 1812, first county recorder, a member of the Indiana 1816 Constitutional Convention, military associate and friend of Generals William Henry Harrison, Arthur St. Clair and Captain Samuel C. Vance.

Erected 1976 by Dearborn County Bicentennial Committee.

Location. 39° 1.162' N, 85° 3.662' W.
Marker is in Dillsboro, Indiana, in Dearborn County.
Marker is at the intersection of Front Street and Bank Street, on the left when traveling north on Front Street.
Located at the Town Office and Fire Station.
Marker is in this post office area: Dillsboro IN 47018, United States of America.

Brief History
Early settlers to southeast Indiana settled along the Laughery Creek valley. Sometime in 1816, a group of settlers from Springfield, Ohio filtered into the area that became Dillsboro. Mathias Whetstone laid out Dillsboro on March 16, 1830. The plat included sixteen lots.  William Williamson donated land for a log church, which became the Hopewell Presbyterian Church sometime around 1826. The cemetery remains, however the congregation moved to Dillsboro later on.
Mathias Whetstone (July 7, 1821 - ?)
The son of John and Susan (Ramer) Whetstone, Mathias was native to Cincinnati, Ohio. He married Nancy Parker on October 4, 1844. The author could find little additional information about Mr. Whetstone.

This Day in Indiana - September 22, 1853 - First Boat to Travel Entire Length of Wabash-Erie Canal Reaches Evansville

A Day in Indiana History - September
A Day in Indiana History - September
September 22, 1853 - First Boat to Travel Entire Length of Wabash-Erie Canal Reaches Evansville
The  first ship to travel the entire length of the Wabash and Erie Canal, the Pennsylvania, arrived in Evansville on September 22, 1853. The longest canal in the United States and the second largest in the world now connected the Great Lakes with the Ohio River.
The Wabash and Erie
In the dawning years of the Nineteenth Century, the quest for fast, cheap transportation of freight over long distances seemed in reach with the construction and economic success of the Erie Canal. The Erie Canal connected New York City with the Great Lakes. It spurred New York's growth as a major commercial center. It also provided encouragement more canal construction across the United States. Landlocked states like Indiana seized on canals as the answer to open markets in inland cities that lacked navigable rivers. The Wabash and Erie was the first of these projects tackled by Indiana.
The Proposed Canal
The proposed canal was a grand project. It would span 468 miles across Indiana and Ohio, connecting it the Erie Canal via the Great Lakes with Evansville on the Ohio River. The Wabash and Erie actually consisted of four main canals, the Miami and Erie Canal, the Wabash and Erie Canal, the Cross Cut Canal and the Central Canal.
Miami and Erie Canal
The 274-mile Miami and Erie Canal connected Toledo, Ohio on Lake Erie with Cincinnati, Ohio on the Ohio River. Workers commenced construction in 1825 and finished in 1845. When complete, the canal had nineteen aqueducts, three guard locks, 103 canal locks and multiple feeder canals. The canal was profitable, but not as profitable as the state of Ohio hoped. Competition from railroads ended canal commercial operations by 1913.
Wabash and Erie
This canal began at Junction, Ohio and to Terre Haute. Junction received its name because the Wabash and Erie joined the Miami and Erie Canal in the town. The town flourished during the 1840's through the 1850's until the railroads began displacing the canals.
Cross Cut Canal
The Cross Cut Canal continued the Wabash and Erie route from Terre Haute to Worthington, Indiana.
Central Canal
The Central Canal completed the link from Worthington to Evansville. This was the last link completed in 1853.
Construction Begins
Because many credit George Washington with the suggestion that a canal be built through the region, the builders chose the 100th anniversary of his birth as the date to begin construction of the huge enterprise. Thus, on February 22, 1832 construction crews broke ground for the Wabash and Erie Canal.
Excerpted from the author’s book:
A Day in Indiana History – March

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Aurora - Dearborn County Historical Marker


By Ginger Drenning, August 23, 2009

Aurora Historical Marker

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South East Edition
Inscription.
Aurora was laid out by Jesse L. Holman, trustee for the “Aurora Association for Internal Improvements” in 1819. Judge Holman was an early statesman, preacher, educator, and Federal Justice.
His son, U.S. Congressman William S. Holman served this district many years and was called “the Watchdog of the Treasury”.
 Erected 1976 by Dearborn County Bicentennial Committee.
 Location. 39° 3.144' N, 84° 53.848' W. Marker is in Aurora, Indiana, in Dearborn County. Marker is on Route 56 south of 5th Street, on the right when traveling north.
South Edge of Aurora - in public parking area along the Ohio River at river's edge.
Marker is in this post office area: Aurora IN 47001, United States of America

Brief History

Jesse Lynch Holman (October 24, 1784 – March 18, 1842)
The son of Henry Holeman and Jane Gordon, Jessy was a native of the frontier near Danville, Kentucky. After reading law, the Kentucky bar admitted him in 1805. Holman practiced law first at Carrollton, Kentucky. After moving to New Castle and Frankfort, he moved to a site near current Aurora, Indiana in 1811. He built a two story log home overlooking the Ohio River he called Veraestau.
Politics and Law
Indiana Territorial Governor William Henry Harrison appointed Holman as prosecuting attorney for Dearborn County and  judge of the second judicial circuit in 1814. He also served as a member of the Territorial legislative assembly. After statehood, he served on the circuit court and on the Indiana Supreme court until 1830.
Return to Private Life
He went back to Verastau in 1831 to reopen his law office. Holman became an ordained Baptist minister in 1834, after an unsuccessful bid for the United States Senate. His later efforts led to the founding of  Indiana University, Franklin College, and the Indiana Historical Society. He also wrote a novel, The Prisoners of the Niagara. This was published in 1810. He founded the Indiana Bible Society on June 4, 1831.
Federal Judge
Holman's last public post was as appointee to the U.S. District Court for the District of Indiana by President Andrew Jackson in 1835. He held this post until his death in 1842.
Veraestau
Holman added a brick addition to the structure. The cabin burned down in 1837. Holman's son bought the property, salvaged the brick addition and added a one story Greek Revival structure. After later additions, the Holman family owned the home for 125 years. The Holmans sold the home to Cornelius O’Brien, a Lawrenceburg businessman. His daughter, Mary O'Brien Gibson, deeded Verestau to the Indiana Landmarks. The home has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places and serves as the regional Southeast Field Office  for Indiana Landmarks. The home is available for rent for weddings and events.
 Veraestau Historic Site
 4696 Veraestau Lane
 Aurora, IN 47001-9406
 812-926-0983
veraestau@indianalandmarks.org

This article excerpted from the author's book:
A Day in Indiana History - June