Friday, April 28, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - April 28, 1941 - James Whitcomb Riley Begins Regular Passenger Service

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

April 28, 1941 - James Whitcomb Riley Begins Regular Passenger Service
The New York Central railroad rolled their new passenger train, called the James Whitcomb Riley, on April 28, 1941. The train offered deluxe, daytime service between Cincinnati, Ohio and Chicago, Illinois via Indianapolis, Indiana. The train joined the other luxurious trains that New York Central called the Great Steel Fleet. In a short period of time it became one of the New York Central's top passenger trains. They named the train after famous Hoosier poet and writer, James Whitcomb Riley.
James Whitcomb Riley (October 7, 1849 – July 22, 1916)
A native of Greenfield, Indiana, James Whitcomb Riley wrote several books and published many poems. His poems were popular with children, earning him the sobriquet "Children's Poet," as well as the "Hoosier Poet," because of the Hoosier dialect he adopted for his poetry and performances. Riley died of a stroke in 1916. At his wake in the Indiana Capitol Building 35,000 people filed past his casket.
The James Whitcomb Riley
The train debuted sporting a sleek design that featured a shrouded steam locomotive. The elegant gray and red train departed Cincinnati, Ohio at 8:15 AM as Train #3 and arrived in Indianapolis, Indiana at 9:00 AM. After a ten minute layover, the train departed Union Station and completed the 302 mile trip by 12:45 PM. Designated Train #4 the James Whitcomb Riley departed Chicago for the return trip at 4:40 PM, arriving in Indianapolis at 8:10 PM. After a ten-minute layover, the train departed, arriving in Cincinnati at 11:10 PM. In 1948, the s New York Central upgraded the locomotives and the service. Amenities of the train included a tavern-lounge, grill-diner, and tavern-observation complementing lightweight coaches. The train maintained its name and luxurious amenities until the mid to late 1960's. During that time rail, authorities lengthened the timetable to accommodate more stops along the route. The name was finally discontinued 0n October 30, 1977, replaced by the Cardinal.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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© Paul Wonning

Thursday, April 27, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - April 27, 1876 - Martin County Court House Burns

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

April 27, 1876 - Martin County Court House Burns
Martin County early in its history developed a reputation for changing its county seat frequently. The residents of the county petitioned the Indiana General Assembly eight times for a change in county seats. Finally, on July 4, 1871, the ninth county seat in Martin County opened for business in West Shoals. The Court House burned on April 27, 1876, creating a need for a new one. Since then the town of Shoals has encompassed the town of West Shoals, so the courthouse moved to a new town without having to be relocated. The old court house served as the county seat of government until 2002, when a new one replaced it. The building currently houses the Martin County Historical Museum. For information, contact:
Martin County Historical Society
Capital Ave
P.O. Box 564
Shoals, Indiana 47581
812-247-1133
historical@frontier.com

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
@indianatreker
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Twitter
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© Paul Wonning

Wednesday, April 26, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - April 26, 1884 - The Great Wallace Show Begins - Peru

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

April 26, 1884 - The Great Wallace Show Begins - Peru
Benjamin E. Wallace opened his Wallace and Co.'s Great World Menagerie, Grand International Mardi Gras, Highway Holiday Hidalgo and Alliance of Novelties in Peru, Indiana on April 26, 1884. The show began with great fanfare, featuring a parade of exotic animals, top-notch performers and brass band.
Benjamin E. Wallace (October 4, 1847 - April 7, 1921)
A native of Johnstown, Pennsylvania, Benjamin was the son of Ephraim and Rebecca Wallace. Wallace migrated to Peru, Indiana and established a livery business there. He became interested in the circus business so he and a business partner, James Anderson, began assembling a collection of circus equipment. The largest complement of equipment came from a circus called the W. C. Coup Circus. This circus had become financially unstable and went bankrupt. Wallace traveled to Detroit and purchased much of the equipment, which included rail cars full of tents, poles, costuming and other equipment. From other circuses, he obtained many of the animals he would need for the act. He set up headquarters outside of Peru and billed his first show for April 26, 1884 in Peru.
Fire Strikes
On January 25, 1884, a fire from an overheated stove swept through the circus. The fire killed many of the animals. Monkeys, tigers, deer and other animals perished in the fire. Wallace persisted with the opening of the show. Until the damaged living quarters for the animals could be repaired, he kept many of the surviving animals in an abandoned chair factory on Second Street in Peru.
Opening Night
The Wallace and Co.'s Great World Menagerie, Grand International Mardi Gras, Highway Holiday Hidalgo and Alliance of Novelties in Peru opened on schedule, accompanied by the Peru brass band and over 5,000 spectators. Spectators packed the two performances, with many turned away. The show was a success. The season open, the circus went on tour, visiting many small towns in southern Indiana and Ohio. The tour also included towns in Kentucky and Virginia. Since there was no entertainment of any sort in most of these towns, people packed the shows. Wallace did not disappoint them as his retinue included some of the best performers and animals that were well trained and treated. The next year he shortened the name to The Great Wallace Show. He had winter quarters for the circus in Peru.
Hagenbeck-Wallace Circus
The circus continued for many years with increasing success. In 1907, Wallace purchased the Carl Hagenbeck Circus. He combined the two acts into the Hagenbeck-Wallace Circus, which continued operations until the Flood of 1913 damaged the circus and killed many of the animals. He sold the circus to a corporation that continued the circus as the American Circus Corporation before operations finally ceased in 1938.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
@indianatreker
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© Paul Wonning

Tuesday, April 25, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - April 25, 1898 - Governor James A. Mount Calls for Volunteers - Spanish American War

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

April 25, 1898 - Governor James A. Mount Calls for Volunteers - Spanish American War
When war broke out between the United States and Spain in 1898, President William McKinley issued a call for volunteers on April 22, 1898 to fight the war. Indiana Governor James A. Mount received the notification on April 25 the War Department wanted Indiana to supply four regiments of infantry and two batteries of light artillery.
Spanish American War
The Cuban War of Independence had begun in 1895 as the Cubans rebelled against Spanish repression. The Americans saw their conflict a century earlier mirrored in the Cuban revolt against Spain. American sentiment thus ran towards the Cuban revolutionaries. McKinley sought a peaceful resolution of the conflict and, by negotiation, managed to get a Cuban government installed. The island still teemed with unrest and riots erupted in Havana. McKinley sent the USS Maine into the harbor to protect United States interests. On February 15, 1898, a massive explosion rocked the harbor. Moments later the Maine sank, because of the explosion. When an investigation, concluded March 28, revealed that an external explosion had caused the ship's powder magazine, suspicion settled on the Spanish. Major newspapers began publicizing the incident and the United States soon developed war fever. Spain declared war on the United States on April 23. Congress declared war on Spain on April 25.
Indiana Responds
Governor Mount assured the President that Indiana's quota of troops would be filled within 24 hours. Mount issued a call to the state for volunteers to assemble at the Indiana State Fairgrounds, which had served as a recruiting and training camp during the Civil War. Indiana mustered Volunteer regiments 157 through 160. This number system continued the regimental numbers began during the Civil War. The state also organized the 27th and 28th Light Batteries. Enthusiasm in the state was so high that it was the first state to fulfill its quota of troops. On May 25, McKinley issued a call for more troops. The Indiana General Assembly had reorganized the Indiana National Guard in 1895, so the Guard was trained and ready to go. Indiana supplied over 7000 troops for the War; however, none went to battle. The war only lasted four months, Spain surrendering before the bulk of United States troops could be deployed. Seventy-three soldiers died of disease during the short war.
Hostilities between the two nations stopped on August 12, 1898 when Spain and the United States signed a Protocol of Peace. The peace treaty, ratified February 6, 1899 gave the United States the territories of Guam, Philippines, Puerto Rico and Guantánamo Bay on Cuba, which became a protectorate of the United States.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
@indianatreker
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© Paul Wonning

Monday, April 24, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - April 24, 1844 - St Mary's College and Academy - Cornerstone First Building Laid

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

April 24, 1844 - St Mary's College and Academy - Cornerstone First Building Laid
The Bishop of Vincennes had sent priests and brothers of the Congregation of Holy Cross to northern Indiana in the early 1840's to found a university. The Congregation responded by founding the University of Notre Dame in 1842. The next year Notre Dame Founder Father Edward Sorin sent a request to Father Basil Anthony Moreau for sisters to come to northern Indiana to found a boarding school. In answer to the call, four Holy Cross sisters voyaged for forty days across the ocean from Le Mans, France. The sisters arrived in late May 1843. They established their school on April 24, 1844 in Bertrand, Michigan, just across the Indiana State Line. At this school, they taught orphan girls and ministered to the sick and poor. Mother Angela Gillespie, head of the school called Saint Mary's Academy, moved the school to its present site near Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana in 1855.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
@indianatreker
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© Paul Wonning

Saturday, April 22, 2017

Short Indiana Road Trips - Volume 2

Short Indiana Road Trips - Volume 2
Short Indiana Road Trips - Volume 2

Like Short Indiana Road Trips - Volume 1, Short Indiana Road Trips - Volume 2 serves as a guidebook for several short, one day road trips that Hoosiers can enjoy. The author has included fifteen destinations complete with contact information, photos and information about what the traveler might encounter.

These fabulous spots in Indiana will make an enjoyable destination for familes to learn and enjoy.


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© Paul R. Wonning 2017

Friday, April 21, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - April 21, 1884 - Hammond Indiana Incorporated

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

April 21, 1884 - Hammond Indiana Incorporated
County - Lake
Township - North
Settled - 1847
Incorporated - April 21, 1884
Named for - George H. Hammond
Area - 24.89 sq mi
Elevation - 577–610 ft
Population (2010) - 80,830
Located between the Grand Calumet River and Lake Michigan, Hammond, Indiana also borders the Little Calumet River and Lake George. I-90 bisects the city, which also has US 20, US 12, US 212 and US 41 pass through the city. Numerous rail lines criss-cross the city, connecting it with other cities in Indiana, Ohio and nearby Chicago. They also connect with the ports along Lake Michigan, offering access to the Atlantic Ocean via the St. Lawrence Seaway.
Hammond History
German farmers began settling the area in 1847 to take advantage of the rich black topsoil that ranges from a few inches to several feet thick. The original soil also consisted of a layer of fine sand that has been mostly removed for construction and industrial purposes. The proximity of a vast supply of fresh water from Lake Michigan encouraged the development of industry in the area. In the 1870, George H. Hammond established a meat packing plant in the area. Hammond pioneered using refrigerated train cars to transport the meat his slaughterhouse produced all over the country. The plant grew, by the 1880's it slaughtered over 100,000 cattle a year.
Incorporation
As the settlement grew, largely because of Hammond's meat packing operation, the population became large enough to become incorporated. It did so on April 21, 1884, taking the name Hammond, to honor the area's largest employer.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
@indianatreker
@MossyFeetBooks
Twitter
@MossyFeetBooks
© Paul Wonning