Tuesday, May 24, 2016

Indiana Photo of the Day - Bridgeton Grist Mill

Indiana Photo of the Day - Bridgeton Grist Mill
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - West Central Edition
Bridgeton Grist Mill
Perched on the banks of Raccoon Creek, Bridgeton Grist Mill is the oldest continually operating gristmill in Indiana. The mill has been open at some point in every year for over 180 years. It is not the oldest gristmill in Indiana, but no other mill has been in continuous operation for that long. The mill began as a log sawmill that eventually included a gristmill as well. That mill burned down in 1869. The mill reopened in a new building, after conversions to a roller mill in the 1880's and to an electric mill in 1951. In 1969 new owners converted it back to a gristmill with the installation of 200-year-old, forty-eight inch French Buhr Stones. This family owned mill is continually being updated and improved. The picturesque mill stands beside the pretty Bridgton Covered Bridge which spans Raccoon Creek over the dam that provides the gristmills power.
The Bridgton Covered Bridge Festival occurs annually in mid-October and runs for ten days. There are other festivals throughout the summer.


For more information, contact:
Bridgeton Grist Mill
8104 Bridgeton Rd
Bridgeton, IN 47836
(812) 877-9550
bridgetonmill@gmail.com

Monday, May 23, 2016

Indiana Photo of the Day - Indiana World War Memorial

Indiana World War Memorial
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - Central Edition
Markers & Museums
Central Edition

Indiana World War Memorial
The 210 foot tall, 30,000 square foot memorial and museum dominates downtown Indianapolis. The American Legion maintains its national headquarters on the plaza.  The Indiana war Memorial Museum is also located here.  You may walk the impressive grounds viewing the many memorials to our State for heroes.  Then you may enter the Museum that honors Indiana's involvement in our rations wars.  This impressive Museum has exhibits depicting Indiana's role in our nation's wars from the Revolutionary war to the current conflicts.  There are literally hundreds of artifacts, weapons, documents, battle flags, and other paraphernalia in the museum.
Indiana World War Memorial
431 N. Meridian St.
Indianapolis, IN 46204
317-232-7615

Friday, May 20, 2016

Indiana Photo of the Day - Summit Lake State Park

This 2,680 Indiana State Park includes 800-acre Summit Lake. Visitors can enjoy hiking, swimming, camping, wildlife viewing and boating.
  Amenities
Picnic areas w/shelters
Interpretive Naturalist Services (Seasonal)
Three Boat Launch Ramps
Boat Motor / Idle speed only
Cross County Skiing / No Ski Rental
Fishing / Ice Fishing
Hiking Trails
Rental-Canoe, Paddleboat, Rowboat
Swimming / Beach
1. Prairie Trail-Moderate (2 Miles)
2. Campground-Moderate (1.25 Miles)
3. Beach Trail- Accessible (.9 Mile)
4. Self-Guided Nature Trail-Moderate (.75 Mile)
Summit Lake
5993 N. Messick Road
New Castle, IN 47362
(765) 766-5873

Thursday, May 19, 2016

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - Central Edition




Take a fun road trip through the rich history of Indiana using Exploring Indiana’s Historic Sites, Markers & Museums Central Edition as your guidebook. Celebrate the Indiana Bi-Centennial by traveling the roads and towns in Central Indiana. Visit the places and learn the stories of Indiana’s rich history.

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Create Space - Softcover Book

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Visitors to central Indiana will find dozens of amazing historic sites to see. Indianapolis forms the focal point with many fabulous museums like the Indiana State Museum, the Medal of Honor Memorial and the Children’s Museum. Other sites in the area include Conner Prairie in Fishers, the Museum of Miniature Houses in Carmel and take a train ride at the Indiana Transportation Museum in Noblesville. Visitors can learn the historic stories of these sites and many more using the Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums – Central Edition as a guide.

Celebrate the Indiana Bi-Centennial in style as you wander through history using the Indiana’s Historic Sites, Markers & Museum series. This guide is part of the Indiana Bicentennial History Road Trip Guide Series. The nine books in this series will list every Historic Marker, Indiana Historic Site and most of the museums found in Indiana. Each Indiana History Guide Book will include contact web sites for the towns and cities of Indiana to help you plan your lodging, dining and shopping needs as you tour Indiana learning stories about the wonderful history of Indiana.







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© Mossy Feet Books 2016



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Indiana Photo of the Day - Grandview, Indiana

Grandview Indiana - Sandy Creek Landing
Grandview Indiana - Sandy Creek Landing

Grandview
County - Spencer
Area - 0.96 sq mi
Elevation - 394 ft
Population (2010) - 749
ZIP code - 47615
Area code - 812
Platted in 1851, the town derived its name from its "Grand View" of the Ohio River. The creek that skirts the eastern boundary of the town, visible from a riverfront park in Indiana State Road 66, is called Sandy Creek. Visitors will find two historical markers in the park, Sandy Creek Landing and Thomas Lincoln.
Sandy Creek Landing
According to the Sandy Creek Marker, early settlers called the area near the creek Sandy Creek Landing. This area was across the Ohio River from Blackford Creek, Kentucky the site of Fort Blackford. Here an Amerindian trail known as Warrior Trail connected Hardinsburg Kentucky in the east to Owensboro, Kentucky on the Ohio River.  Fort Blackford was about halfway along this forty-five mile trail. Settlers would camp around Fort Blackford as they waited for William Henry Harrison to conclude the Treaty of Grouseland in 1805. When the treaty became official, settlers poured across into the newly opened lands. The land office to purchase lands was a three-day ride west to Vincennes. Most of the new settlers erected temporary cabins near here to settle in until they had their lands purchased. Then they would move on.
Thomas Lincoln Family
According to the second marker, Sandy Creek Landing is where the Thomas Lincoln family crossed the Ohio from Kentucky in 1816, the same year Indiana became a state.
The small park here, on the Ohio River Scenic Byway, truly affords a "Grand View" of the Ohio River, especially at sunset.

© Indiana Places 2016

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

Indiana Photo of the Day - Orangeville Rise of the Lost River

Orangeville Rise of the Lost River
Orangeville Rise of the Lost River
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums -
 South Central Edition
Orangeville Rise & Wesley Chapel Gulf of the Lost River
Rise of Lost River Orleans
Lost River
Length - About 87 Miles
The Lost River is a large sinking and subterranean stream, and an intricate cave system. There are two forks of the Lost River. The North Fork begins southwest of the intersection of North Smedley Road and West Ben Walton Road. The South Fork of the Lost River begins about 1.5 miles south just west of North Smedley Road in Washington County. The North and South Forks of the Lost River meet about three miles west of their sources. The junction is somewhat less than a mile east of Claysville, IN, just south of Lost River Road in Washington County. On its way west the Lost River crosses Washington, Orange and Martin Counties. For about 23 miles of this length, mostly in Orange County, the Lost River flows underground, hence its name.
You may tour the system on your own. There are two main features, the Orangeville Rise and the Wesley Chapel Gulf.
Orangeville Rise

Visitors will find both features southwest of Orleans. The Orangeville Rise is on County Road 500 N, on the south side of the town of Orangeville. Access the Wesley Chapel Gulf is from the intersection of County Road 500 W and 350 West. It is about .3 miles south of 500 W. Each site has a small parking lot. Hiking trails will allow you to inspect the sites. At the Orangeville Rise Indiana's second largest spring comes to the surface, forming streams that intersect with the Lost River.

© Indiana Places 2016

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Wesley Chapel Gulf of the Lost River

Wesley Chapel Gulf of the Lost River
Wesley Chapel Gulf of the Lost River

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
 Markers & Museums -
South Central Edition
Lost River
Length - About 87 Miles

The Lost River is a large sinking and subterranean stream, and an intricate cave system. There are two forks of the Lost River. The North Fork begins southwest of the intersection of North Smedley Road and West Ben Walton Road. The South Fork of the Lost River begins about 1.5 miles south just west of North Smedley Road in Washington County. The North and South Forks of the Lost River meet about three miles west of their sources. The juction is somewhat less than a mile east of Claysville, IN, just south of Lost River Road in Washington County. On its way west the Lost River crosses Washington, Orange and Martin Counties. For about 23 miles of this length, mostly in Orange County, the Lost River flows underground, hence its name. You may tour the system on your own. There are two main features, the Orangeville Rise and the Wesley Chapel Gulf
Wesley Chapel Gulf - Hoosier National Forest
South of Bloomington on SR 37 through Orleans for another two and a half miles to CR 500N; turn right on 500 and go to Wesley Chapel at the third crossroads. Turn left (south) here and go a quarter mile to where a road goes off to the east; park in the farm lane opposite the road. A trail leads to the Gulf.
Wesley Chapel Gulf
Wesley Chapel Gulf Area is a 187-acre tract of land located on the Hoosier National Forest in western Orange County, Indiana. The Gulf is approximately four and one-half miles southwest of Orleans and two miles east of Orangeville. It is named for the Wesley Chapel Church, located just to the north. The church was built in 1858, originally known as Bruner's Chapel, and has an associated cemetery.
National Natural Landmark
Wesley Chapel Gulf was designated as a National Natural Landmark in 1972 due to its impressive geologic features. The gulf provides a rare glimpse of the Lost River on its subterranean path. Several other karst features are represented in the immediate area of the Gulf including swallow holes, sinkholes, and caves. The Forest Service recognized the uniqueness of Wesley Chapel Gulf and acquired the property in 1996 through a land exchange with U.S. Gypsum Co. The best time to visit Wesley Chapel Gulf is in the fall after the foliage has died down, or during the winter months.
4245 North Fairfax Drive, Suite 100
Arlington, VA 22203-1606
Office Phone: +1 (703) 841-5300

© Indiana Places 2016