Monday, April 24, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - April 24, 1844 - St Mary's College and Academy - Cornerstone First Building Laid

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

April 24, 1844 - St Mary's College and Academy - Cornerstone First Building Laid
The Bishop of Vincennes had sent priests and brothers of the Congregation of Holy Cross to northern Indiana in the early 1840's to found a university. The Congregation responded by founding the University of Notre Dame in 1842. The next year Notre Dame Founder Father Edward Sorin sent a request to Father Basil Anthony Moreau for sisters to come to northern Indiana to found a boarding school. In answer to the call, four Holy Cross sisters voyaged for forty days across the ocean from Le Mans, France. The sisters arrived in late May 1843. They established their school on April 24, 1844 in Bertrand, Michigan, just across the Indiana State Line. At this school, they taught orphan girls and ministered to the sick and poor. Mother Angela Gillespie, head of the school called Saint Mary's Academy, moved the school to its present site near Notre Dame in South Bend, Indiana in 1855.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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© Paul Wonning

Saturday, April 22, 2017

Short Indiana Road Trips - Volume 2

Short Indiana Road Trips - Volume 2
Short Indiana Road Trips - Volume 2

Like Short Indiana Road Trips - Volume 1, Short Indiana Road Trips - Volume 2 serves as a guidebook for several short, one day road trips that Hoosiers can enjoy. The author has included fifteen destinations complete with contact information, photos and information about what the traveler might encounter.

These fabulous spots in Indiana will make an enjoyable destination for familes to learn and enjoy.


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© Paul R. Wonning 2017

Friday, April 21, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - April 21, 1884 - Hammond Indiana Incorporated

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

April 21, 1884 - Hammond Indiana Incorporated
County - Lake
Township - North
Settled - 1847
Incorporated - April 21, 1884
Named for - George H. Hammond
Area - 24.89 sq mi
Elevation - 577–610 ft
Population (2010) - 80,830
Located between the Grand Calumet River and Lake Michigan, Hammond, Indiana also borders the Little Calumet River and Lake George. I-90 bisects the city, which also has US 20, US 12, US 212 and US 41 pass through the city. Numerous rail lines criss-cross the city, connecting it with other cities in Indiana, Ohio and nearby Chicago. They also connect with the ports along Lake Michigan, offering access to the Atlantic Ocean via the St. Lawrence Seaway.
Hammond History
German farmers began settling the area in 1847 to take advantage of the rich black topsoil that ranges from a few inches to several feet thick. The original soil also consisted of a layer of fine sand that has been mostly removed for construction and industrial purposes. The proximity of a vast supply of fresh water from Lake Michigan encouraged the development of industry in the area. In the 1870, George H. Hammond established a meat packing plant in the area. Hammond pioneered using refrigerated train cars to transport the meat his slaughterhouse produced all over the country. The plant grew, by the 1880's it slaughtered over 100,000 cattle a year.
Incorporation
As the settlement grew, largely because of Hammond's meat packing operation, the population became large enough to become incorporated. It did so on April 21, 1884, taking the name Hammond, to honor the area's largest employer.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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© Paul Wonning

Thursday, April 20, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - April 20, 1839 - Wabash and Erie Canal Opened to Logansport

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

April 20, 1839 - Wabash and Erie Canal Opened to Logansport
By autumn, 1838 workers had dug the channel for the Wabash and Erie Canal through to Logansport, Indiana. However, the official opening was not until the following spring on April 20, 1839.
Logansport
The 1818 Treaty with the Pottawatomie, signed by the Pottawatomie Tribe and Commissioners of the United States Governor Jonathon Jennings, Lewis Cass, and Benjamin Parke opened up the area that became Logansport. After the treaty signing, settlers began moving into the area. By 1828, the population was sufficient to form a county, which became called Cass County after Lewis Cass. The fertile land at the union of the Eel and Wabash Rivers was an ideal spot to begin a settlement. According to local lore, the new town received its name because of a shooting contest between Hugh McKeen, an early settler, and Colonel John B. Duret. The winner would get to choose the name of the new town. Duret won the contest and chose the name, Logan’s Port, naming if for an Amerindian scout for William Henry Harrison during the War of 1812 named Captain Logan.
Captain Logan (c. 1774 - November 25 1812)
Captain Logan (James Renick-Logan) served as a valuable scout for William Henry Harrison in the War of 1812. There are two versions about the origins of Captain Logan’s ancestry, one that he was half-Shawnee/half European and the other that he was full-blooded Shawnee. Harrison admired Captain Logan, and the scout gained fame in Indiana due to his exploits in the service of Harrison. Thus, when Logansport incorporated in 1838, it chose the name Logan’s Port, naming it for the new port the Wabash and Erie Canal provided and Captain Logan. The name became shortened to Logansport.
Transportation Hub
Logansport's location along the Wabash and Erie Canal provided a means for its early growth. The Michigan Road, which traveled from the Ohio River through Indianapolis to Michigan, also went through the town. Later, railroads provided a dependable means of transportation after the demise of the canal.
Historic Attractions in Logansport
Cass County Historical Museum
1004 East Market
Logansport, IN
574-753-3866
Dentzel Carousel
1208 Riverside
Logansport, IN
574-753-8725
For information on the lodging, dining, shopping and other attractions of Logansport, contact:

Cass County Visitor's Bureau
PO Box 281
311 S 5th St
Logansport IN
574.753.4856
info@visit-casscounty.com

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
@indianatreker
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© Paul Wonning

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - April 19, 1816 - President James Madison Signs Enabling Act - Allows Indiana Territory to Form Constitution

indiana
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

April 19, 1816 - President James Madison Signs Enabling Act - Allows Indiana Territory to Form Constitution
On December 11, 1815, the Indiana Territorial Assembly sent a petition to Congress, requesting it be granted statehood. The Territorial representative in Congress presented the petition to select committees in the House and the Senate. Both committees returned a favorable verdict, and the Enabling Act went on for a floor vote. The United States House of Representatives voted in favor of admitting Indiana as a state on March 30, 1816. by a 108 - 3. The Senate passed the Act on April 13, 1816. President James Madison signed the bill on April 19, 1816. The Indiana Territorial Assembly was now free to write a constitution. The Act specified that the Convention should meet on June 10, 1816 to draft the Constitution that would lead to Statehood.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
@indianatreker
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© Paul Wonning

Tuesday, April 18, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - April 18, 1945 - Ernie Pyle Killed - Hoosier War Correspondent

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

April 18, 1945 - Ernie Pyle Killed - Hoosier War Correspondent
Ernie Pyle (August 3, 1900 – April 18, 1945)
The son of William Clyde Pyle and Maria Taylor, Ernie was a native of Dana, Indiana. He attended local schools at Dana, and then enlisted in the United States Navy Reserve during World War I. He served three months active duty before the war ended. After completing his reserve duties, he attended Indiana University, editing the Indiana Daily Student Newspaper. He also toured Asia with members of his fraternity. He left Indiana University before graduating to take a job with a newspaper in LaPorte, Indiana. After a few months in La Porte, he went to Washington, DC to report for The Washington Daily News. During this time, he met Geraldine "Jerry" Siebolds, whom he married in 1925.
From Editor to Columnist
Pyle worked several stints as editor for the Washington Daily News. In between editing jobs, he quit to travel across the United States with his wife. He came down with a severe case of the flu in 1932 and went to live in California for several months to recover. Upon his return, he took over as columnist for syndicated columnist Heywood Broun, who was on vacation. Pyle's eleven columns about his life in California were a hit with his colleagues and the public. The Scripps-Howard newspaper chain hired him to write a daily column in 1935. His writing encompassed ordinary people that he encountered in his travels across America.
War Correspondent
He continued this column until 1942. War had broken out and Pyle became a war correspondent. He continued his trait of writing about common people by eschewing covering generals. Instead, he wrote about the GI's that fought the war in the trenches and on the line. His everyman reporting won him a Pulitzer Prize in 1944. His columns were popular among the public and the soldiers he wrote about and his fame rose to a national level.
Death Under Fire
Pyle hit the beach with the Army's 305th Infantry Regiment of the 77th "Liberty Patch" Division on the small island of Iejima. During the landing, he had a premonition about his death. The troops secured their positions, and Pyle walked to have a chat with a regimental commanding officer. Too late, they found that they had not secured the position completely. A Japanese machine gun fired a burst of bullets. Pyle and the officer dove for cover. After a pause, the two men rose up to reconnoiter their position. A bullet from another machine gun burst caught Pyle above the temple, killing him instantly. He is interred at the National Memorial Cemetery of the Pacific in Honolulu. The 77th Army Reserve Command issued a Purple Heart to Pyle, a rare occurrence for a civilian.
The Ernie Pyle Development Fund Inc. maintains a museum to Pyle in his home town of Dana, Indiana. Those interested in further information or visiting the museum may contact:
The Friends of Ernie Pyle
P.O. Box 345
Dana, IN  47847
765-665-3633

Ernie Pyle World War II Museum
120 W Briarwood Ave Dana,
IN 47847

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
@indianatreker
@MossyFeetBooks
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© Paul Wonning

Monday, April 17, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - Joseph Albert Wright - Indiana Governor Born

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

April 17 - 1810 - Joseph Albert Wright - Indiana Governor Born
Joseph Albert Wright (April 17, 1810 - May 11, 1867)
Governor Term - December 5, 1849-January 12, 1857
The son of bricklayer John and his wife Rachel Seaman Wright, Joseph was a native of Washington, Pennsylvania. The family moved to Bloomington Indiana in 1820. His father was one of the workers employed to build the new Indiana State Seminary that later became Indiana University. His father died in 1824. Joseph worked at various jobs, including stints of his father's craft of bricklaying to pay for his schooling and to help the family's finances. He attended Indiana State Seminary, mainly because he could live at home, cutting the expenses of a college education. He earned money by selling fruits, nuts and other things he gathered from the forest surrounding Bloomington to his wealthier classmates.
Law, Then Politics
After graduating from the Seminary in 1829, he studied law with Judge Craven Hester, gaining admittance to the bar in 1829. He opened a law practice in Rockville, Indiana. He married Louisa Cook. Together they had one child. Sickness from malaria prevented her from having more children, so the couple adopted other children. He served two terms in the Indiana House of Representatives, prosecuting attorney, and then the Indiana Senate in 1839.
United States Congress
He served one term in the Indiana Senate, and then reopened his law office. He ran for Congress in 1843, winning a narrow election. His bid for re-election in 1845 went down to narrow defeat, as did another bid in 1847.
Governor
Wright was a Democrat, but opposed slavery. The Democratic Party chose him as its standard-bearer in the 1849 governor's race. His anti-slavery stance helped him gain election as Governor of Indiana in 1849. During his term, he ushered in Indiana's new Constitution and championed agriculture in the state. He signed legislation creating the State Board of Agriculture and supported the first Indiana State Fair in 1851. The new constitution took effect in 1851. Under the old constitution, a governor could only serve one term. The new constitution forbid serving consecutive terms. Wright decided to run again, a move opposed by his political foes as unconstitutional. However, it was decided that since his first term was under the old Constitution and his second term would be under the new one, he was eligible to serve. He went on to win a "second" term in 1852.
Senator
Wright and Senator Jesse D. Bright had been political foes during their political lives. Both Democrats, Wright opposed slavery, while Bright supported it. After Wright completed his second term, he deferred a chance to run for United States Senator in 1857against Bright under a promise that Bright would help Wright secure a cabinet post with new President James Buchanan. Instead, Bright recommended that Buchanan appoint him as envoy to Prussia. During Wright's tenure in Prussia, Bright had Wright removed from the Democratic Party. When the Civil War broke out in 1861, Wright returned to Indiana. Bright had written a letter to Confederate President Jefferson Davis promising support. The letter was intercepted and the United States Senate expelled Bright from the chamber. Indiana Governor Oliver Morton appointed Wright to fill Bright's term. Morton proceeded to confiscate Bright's property in Jeffersonville, Indiana for use as a military hospital. Bright, impoverished, moved to Kentucky where he served in various political posts until his death in 1875. President Lincoln named Wright again as ambassador of Prussia in 1863. He died in that post in 1867. His body is interred in New York City.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
@indianatreker
@MossyFeetBooks
Twitter
@MossyFeetBooks
© Paul Wonning