Friday, March 24, 2017

Canals and Rivers Auto Trail

Driving the Canals and Rivers Auto Trail
Driving the Canals and Rivers Auto Trail

Take a wonderful road trip through southeastern Indiana by driving the Canals and Rivers Auto Trail. This delightful auto trail tours through the heart of Franklin and Dearborn Counties. Explore the historic sites of Metamora, Brookville, Lawrenceburg and Aurora, Indiana. Visit the Whitewater Canal State Historic site, then drive along the Whitewater and Ohio Rivers. Tour historic Hillforest Mansion in Aurora, and then return to Metamora through the scenic southeastern Indiana countryside.

Available On:
Kindle

Amazon Softbound

Smashwords

Smashwords - 20% Free Sample

Barnes & Noble

Barnes & Noble - Softbound

Kobo

Google Play

Apple
.
Create Space - Softcover Book

Paul Wonning's Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Smashwords Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Apple

Paul Wonning's Books on Kobo
Paul Wonning's Books on Barnes and Noble

© Paul R. Wonning 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 24, 1913 - Great Flood of 1913 - Record Flooding Across Indiana

March 24, 1913 - Great Flood of 1913 - Record Flooding Across Indiana
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

The morning of March 24 began with tornados and heavy winds that reached over fifty miles per hour. The winds ripped roofs off buildings and downed trees. By evening torrential rains developed that would total over eight inches in some areas. Ground still stiff with winter's frost sloughed off the rain, casting it into the rivers. The Wabash, White and Ohio Rivers spilled over their banks. By evening on the twenty-fourth, the waters reached near the top of the levees.
Fort Wayne Hardest Hit
The floodwaters breached the levees at Fort Wayne by March 25. The rains continued to fall and the floodwaters continued to rise. The floodwaters forced the mayor to shut down the water system, eliminating the people's source of drinking water. They would have to boil floodwaters to have water to drink. No drinking water was actually the least of their problems. The floodwaters flooded homes and businesses. The flood forced the electric utilities to shut down and destroyed large sections of railroad track. Damage to rail lines and roads left many communities with no access to the outside world for weeks. By March 26, the storms had stopped and the waters began receding. Seven people died in the floods and 15,000 were homeless. Businesses and homeowners suffered property damage of almost five million dollars.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
@indianatreker
@MossyFeetBooks
Twitter
@MossyFeetBooks
© Paul Wonning

Thursday, March 23, 2017

Parke County Covered Bridge Auto Trails

Parke County Covered Bridge Auto Trails
Parke County Covered Bridge Auto Trails

Explore the covered bridges and peaceful rural countryside of beautiful Parke County, Indiana. This wonderful region has over thirty historic covered bridges preserved for visitors to see. Parke County Covered Bridge Auto Trails includes the history of not only the bridges, but many of the men that built them as well. Anyone that anticipates visiting this beautiful area will want to read Parke County Covered Bridge Auto Trails and take it with them as they enjoy the wonderful Parke County, Indiana countryside.

Available On:
Kindle
Amazon Softbound
Smashwords
Smashwords - 20% Free Sample
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble - Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Apple
Create Space - Softcover Book
Paul Wonning's Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Smashwords Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Apple
Paul Wonning's Books on Kobo
Paul Wonning's Books on Barnes and Noble

© Paul R. Wonning 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 23, 1823 - Schyler Colfax Born

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 23, 1823 - Schyler Colfax Born
Nicknamed "Smiler" because of his perennial good nature, Colfax served in the United States House of Representatives as Speaker. He became the first Speaker to gain election to the Vice Presidency of the United States. Political scandal almost cost him the Vice-Presidency and did end his political career before he reached the apex of politics, the Presidency.
Born in New York
Bank Teller Schyler Colfax, Sr. and Hannah Stryker conceived their child Schyler in New York City. Schyler Sr. died of tuberculosis five months before Schyler Jr. was born. By age ten the boy worked as a retail clerk to help with the family finances while attending school. His mother married George W. Matthews. Matthews moved his new family to Indiana, settling in New Carlisle. Schyler worked in his stepfathers store as a boy, reading newspapers on a barrel during slow times. He continued his education by borrowing books from whoever would loan them to him.
Start in Politics
In 1841, his family moved to South Bend and his father gained election as county auditor. Schyler gained his first political experience when his stepfather hired him as his deputy. When he was sixteen, Schyler wrote a letter to Horace Greeley and offered to write political articles for the New-York Tribune. Greeley accepted the offer and Schyler began both his newspaper career and his life-long friendship with Greeley. He moved into politics in 1848 by serving as the Whig delegate to the Indiana convention. He then gained election to the convention that wrote the new Indiana Constitution of 1851. The Whigs chose him to run for Congress in 1851, an election that he narrowly lost. The Whig party disintegrated during this time and for a few years, the political scene was a disorganized mess. Schyler ran for Congress again in 1854 on the Indiana People's Party's slate. He won but when he arrived in Congress, there was much confusion as to who belonged to what party. Eventually the Republican Party emerged, forming an anti-slavery coalition of Whigs, Democrats and Know-Nothings. Schyler joined this new Republican Party.
Speaker of the House
Schyler served in the House in various capacities until 1862, when he became Speaker. This post he served well in during the tumultuous years of the Civil War and the following Reconstruction period. His political stature grew and in 1868, the Republican delegates chose him to run with Ulysses S. Grant as Vice President. The ticket won that election, but this would prove to be the apex of a career that Colfax had hoped would lead to the Presidency.
The Credit Mobilier Scandal
The Credit Mobilier Company underwrote the costs associated with building the Union Pacific Railroad. Dependent upon federal subsidies, the company distributed stock to influential Congressmen. Colfax proved to be one of those Congressmen. The scandal broke while Colfax served as Vice President. The resulting scandal almost resulted in his impeachment. At the end of his term, he retired back to Indiana to become a successful lecturer.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
@indianatreker
@MossyFeetBooks
Twitter
@MossyFeetBooks
© Paul Wonning

Wednesday, March 22, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 22, 1800 - First Mail Route Between Vincennes and Jeffersonville

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 22, 1800 - First Mail Route Between Vincennes and Jeffersonville
Buffalo Trace
Natural salt licks in what is now northern Kentucky in current Bone Lick State Park drew buffalo from the regions now known as the states of Indiana and Illinois. These buffalo migrated by the thousands over hundreds of years over the same route, forming a wide pathway that the early colonists called the Buffalo Trace.
Salt Licks
Salt licks are places on the earth's surface where naturally occurring salts and mineral become exposed. Animals need these salts and come to them to lick the deposits. There are many mineral licks located across the Midwest, but the best ones were in Kentucky at Big Bone Lick State Park.
Big Bone Lick State Park
Located in northern Kentucky, Big Bone Lick State Park is a natural destination for those seeking to understand the bison that migrated across Indiana and Illinois to lick the mineral deposits exposed in the swampy ground at the park. The licks have existed for millennia, attracting the giant mammoths and other mammals that inhabited North America during the Ice Age. As these animals became extinct, the smaller animals came. Bison, deer and other animals went there in large numbers to lick the minerals from the ground. For more information, contact:
Big Bone Lick State Historic Site
3380 Beaver Road
Union, KY 41091
(859) 384-3522
The Buffalo Trace
The Buffalo Trace began in the prairies of Illinois as the herds of buffalo headed east toward the licks. It crossed the Wabash River near the site of Vincennes, Indiana, providing the French with an ideal spot to establish the trading post that became the city. It crossed southern Indiana, nearing the Ohio River at its shallowest point, the Falls of the Ohio. After crossing the river, the bison traveled across northern Kentucky until they reached the area of the licks. In places, the Trace was up to twenty feet wide. Amerindians used the trace to both hunt the bison and travel cross-country. Since it connected the Ohio, Wabash and Mississippi Rivers the trace provided a highway for the white settlers that wished to go west. Today portions of U. S. 150 follow the Trace, which is now part of the National Scenic Byways Program.
The Postal Route
United States Postmaster General Joseph Habersham established a postal route over the Trace on March 22, 1800. Mail carriers would carry mail over the route every four weeks in the beginning. This was the first Western mail route in the fledgling nation. Two men carried the mail on foot over the 130 mile route.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
@indianatreker
@MossyFeetBooks
Twitter
@MossyFeetBooks
© Paul Wonning

Tuesday, March 21, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 21, 1854 - St. Meinrads Abbey Established

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 21, 1854 - St. Meinrads Abbey Established
Father Joseph Kundek invited monks from the Einsiedeln Abbey in Switzerland to come to Indiana to serve the needs of local Catholics. The monks responded to the call, establishing St. Meinrads as a school for Catholic children. It would also serve as a school to prepare men for the priesthood.
Father Joseph Kundek (January 21, 1809 - December 4, 1857)
A native of Ivanic, Croatia, Father Kundek attended Catholic school at the Gymnasium in Zagreb. Bishop Alagovic of Croatia admitted him to the diocesan school of theology. After his ordination in August 1833, Father Kundek decided to migrate to America to serve the needs of the growing German Catholic population in the Midwest. After studying German for a year in Vienna, Austria, he departed Europe on the ship Alliance on June 8, 1838. He arrived in Vincennes, Indiana on August 7, 1838. Since the Vincennes diocese ministered to only a few Germans, the bishop of Vincennes, Bishop Brute, sent him to Jasper, Indiana, a growing German town. Father Kundek established the Jasper mission on September 28, 1838. By the end of 1839, he established the town of Ferdinand and founded a church there. To minister the needs of the Catholics in southern Indiana his ministerial route covered 700 miles as he traveled between towns. Through letters to his European contacts, he encouraged Catholic to move into the area and by his efforts; thousands of German Catholics migrated into the Jasper area over his lifetime.
St. Meinrads
The monks named the Abbey after St. Meinrad, a Ninth Century monk that lived in Einsiedeln, Switzerland. Known as the "Martyr of Hospitality," he lived as a hermit and solicited gifts from wealthy patrons, which he passed on to the poor. Thieves killed him in 861 to get the gifts he kept at his shrine. The monks that established St. Meinrads began teaching school classes shortly after their arrival. By 1861 the expanded their offerings to include courses in theology and philosophy. Today is one of two arch abbeys in the United States and nine in the world.
To visit St. Meinrad, contact:
Saint Meinrad Archabbey
200 Hill Drive
St. Meinrad, Indiana 47577
812-357-6611
800-581-6905

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
@indianatreker
@MossyFeetBooks
Twitter
@MossyFeetBooks
© Paul Wonning

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Hoosier Dusty Files - March 15, 1957 - Indiana Adopts Peony as State Flower

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

March 15, 1957 - Indiana Adopts Peony as State Flower
The peony became the fourth state flower adopted by the Indiana legislature on March 15, 1957. It followed the carnation, the tulip tree, and the zinnia.
Carnation as State Flower
The Indiana legislature chose the Carnation as the Indiana State Flower on March 15, 1913. Since the carnation is not native to Indiana, many protested the decision. So, the legislature deposed the carnation ten years later.
The Tulip Tree as State Flower
In 1923 the Legislature adopted the blossom of the tulip tree (Liriodendron tulipifera), also called yellow, or tulip, poplar. The tulip tree is a beautiful flower, and a native tree. However, the blossoms are borne high in the tree canopy, making them hard to see. Thus, in 1931 the legislature made the tulip tree the state tree, instead, and crowned the zinnia as the third Indiana State Flower.
The Zinnia as Indiana State Flower
The zinnia reigned supreme in state gardens for twenty-four years. In 1957, the legislature once again took up the subject of the State Flower. Unverified rumors persist that commercial seed producer that grew zinnia seeds helped nudge the zinnia into the role.
The Peony as State Flower
On March 15, 1957, the legislature deposed the zinnia, crowning the peony, instead. Once again, rumors circulate about politics playing a role in the decision. The legislature reportedly had been considering the dogwood blossom, which is native to Indiana, as the state flower. However, a large commercial peony grower managed to substitute the peony, a native of Asia, instead. At any rate, the peony has reigned as the State Flower of Indiana ever since.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
@indianatreker
@MossyFeetBooks
Twitter
@MossyFeetBooks
© Paul Wonning