Friday, September 30, 2016

Dearborn Historical Marker- Dearborn County American Revolution War Memorial

A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
Dearborn  Historical Marker- Dearborn County American Revolution War Memorial

Dearborn County American Revolution War Memorial  - 1775 - 1783
American Revolution War Memorial Marker
By Ginger Drenning, August 23, 2009
Inscription.
In Honor of the Soldiers of
the American Revolution
buried in Dearborn County
Their names are recorded in the County Auditor's Office Book 29 - Page 250.
Erected 1928 by Archibald Lochry Chapter Daughters of The American Revolution.
Marker series. This marker is included in the Daughters of the American Revolution marker series.
Location. 39° 5.456' N, 84° 50.993' W.
Marker is in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, in Dearborn County.
Marker is on West High Street west of Mary Street, on the right when traveling west.
Marker is at or near this postal address:
215 West High Street, Lawrenceburg IN 47025, United States of America.

From the Author of this Web Site
For information about Colonel Archibald Lochrey, see the historical marker


The Indiana Society Sons of the American Revolution Patriot Graves Registry is at this link. You may enter names, counties, etc and recieve a list of names.

Thursday, September 29, 2016

Dearborn County Historical Marker - Dearborn County

A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
Dearborn County Historical Marker - Dearborn County
Dearborn County

By Ginger Drenning, August 23, 2009
Inscription:
Formed by proclamation of Indiana Territorial Governor William Henry Harrison March 7, 1803. Named in honor of Major General Henry Dearborn, Secretary of War.
The third county to be formed, it was originally much larger. Its present boundaries were established January 7, 1845.
First courthouse built 1810, second built 1828, present limestone courthouse built 1870 - 1871.
Erected 1976 by Dearborn County Bicentennial Committee.
Location: 
39° 5.462' N, 84° 50.988' W.
Marker is in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, in Dearborn County.
Marker is on West High Street south of Mary Street, on the right when traveling south.
Llocated at the South East corner of the Dearborn County Courthouse Lawn in Lawrenceburg, Indiana.
Marker is at or near this postal address:
215 West High Street, Lawrenceburg IN 47025, United States of America.

Brief History
See Dearborn County post

Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Dearborn Historical Marker - Abraham Lincoln


A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
Dearborn  Historical Marker - Abraham Lincoln

Indiana (Dearborn County), Lawrenceburg — Abraham Lincoln
Inscription. Abraham Lincoln made a famous pre-inaugural speech from his train platform near here Feb. 12, 1861, placing emphasis on the people's part in justice and good government.

Erected 1966 by Dearborn County Sesquicentennial Committee.

Marker series. This marker is included in the Lincoln 1861 Inaugural Train Stops marker series.

Location. 39° 5.517' N, 84° 50.778' W.
Marker is in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, in Dearborn County.
Marker can be reached from South Walnut Street south of New Street.
Marker is at the Ohio River at the South end of Walnut Street.
Marker is in this post office area: Lawrenceburg IN 47025, United States of America.

Abraham would live in Spencer County in Indiana until March, 1830 when the Lincoln family moved to  Decatur, Illinois. During their stay in Indiana, Abe's mother, Nancy Hanks Lincoln would die of "milk sickness," and his sister Sarah would die during childbirth. Lincoln obtained his law degree in Illinois and began his political career there, culminating with his successful run for President in 1860. Lincoln began his Whistle stop tour on Monday, February 11, 1861 at Springfield, Illinois.
His stops in Indiana included:
State Line City, Indiana

Lafayette, Indiana
Thorntown, Indiana
Lebanon, Indiana
Zionsville, Indiana
Indianapolis, Indiana
Shelbyville, Indiana
Greensburg, Indiana
Morris, Indiana
Lawrenceburg, Indiana

For more information about Lincoln's Whistle Stop Tour, contact:
Lincoln's Whistle Stop Tour in Indiana

Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Dearborn Historical Marker East Fork Stone Chapel


Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South East Edition
East Fork Stone Chapel
By Tom Bosse, July 18, 2015
Inscription.
Erected 1821 by early settlers as a Methodist Church on land donated by John Ewbank. Services were held continuously for more than 125 years. Maintained by endowment fund.
 Erected 1966 by Dearborn County Sesquicentennial Committee.

Location. 
39° 11.327' N, 84° 54.244' W.
Marker is in Guilford, Indiana, in Dearborn County.
Marker is on Indiana Route 1 0.1 miles south of E. Fork Road, on the left when traveling north.
Marker is in this post office area: Guilford IN 47022, United States of America.

Brief History
Parishioners used rock from nearby Tanner's Creek to construct this church in 1821. Members held services in the church for 125 years, until the 1940's. John Ewbank lived in the area and used the cemetery as a family plot. The Ewbank family donated the cemetery and the land for the church, thus visitors will find graves older than 1821. The marker is visible from Indiana State Road 1. To access the church go to East Fork Road and turn left, if coming from Lawrenceburg. The cemetery and graveyard are on the west side of the road. East Fork Road loops back to State Road 1, so turning around are not necessary.

Dearborn  Historical Marker East Fork Stone Chapel

Monday, September 26, 2016

Dearborn Historical Marker St. John The Baptist Church

A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
Dearborn  Historical Marker St. John The Baptist Church

Inscription:
Second Oldest Roman Catholic Church in Indiana. Established 1824. Original log meeting house replaced by frame church in 1842. First brick edifice erected 1847. Present church dedicated October 19, 1879.

Erected 1976 by Dearborn County Bicentennial Committee.

Location. 39° 14.67' N, 84° 56.88' W.
Marker is in Dover, Indiana, in Dearborn County.
Marker is on Indiana Route 1 just south of Sawmill Road, on the left when traveling north.
Marker is in this post office area: Guilford IN 47022, United States of America.

Brief History
Established by Irish Catholics, the congregation formed in 1820 at Dover, and then known as McKenzie's Crossroads, the church was built in 1824. It is the second oldest Catholic parish in Indiana, St. Francis Xavier Cathedral and Library in Vincennes being the oldest. many locals still refer to Dover as "Tipperary." The parishioners built a log church in 1824, which they replaced with a wood frame church in 1842. Missionary priests from Cincinnati, Bardstown in Kentucky and Vincennes visited the flock to tend their needs. The parish officially formed in 1840, when permanent church records began.

Friday, September 23, 2016

General John Morgan - Dearborn County Historical Marker

A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
General John Morgan - Dearborn County Historical Marker

Indiana (Dearborn County), Dover — General John Morgan
Inscription:
Marched east along this road on Monday, July 13, 1863 in his raid across Southern Indiana.
By Tom Bosse, July 18, 2015
1. General John Morgan Marker
Erected 1927 by Dearborn County Historical Society.
 Location. 39° 14.464' N, 84° 56.846' W.
Marker is in Dover, Indiana, in Dearborn County.
Marker is at the intersection of Indiana Route 1 and North Dearborn Road, on the right when traveling north on State Route 1.
Marker is in this post office area: Guilford IN 47022, United States of America.

Brief History:

Morgan’s Raid (July 8-13, 1863)
Brigadier General John Hunt Morgan, in an effort to draw Union troops away from their campaign in Tennessee, crossed the Ohio River with over 2000 trained and seasoned Confederate troops. Fresh off two raids in Kentucky that rattled Union commanders in the area, he defied orders from his superior General Braxton Bragg, by crossing the Ohio River into Indiana on July 8 and 9, 1863.
John Hunt Morgan (June 1, 1825 – September 4, 1864)
The eldest son of ten children born to Calvin and Henrietta (Hunt) Morgan, John's father migrated to Lexington, Kentucky after the failure of his pharmacy. He attended Transylvania College but the university tossed him out in 1844 for dueling. He enlisted in the Army in 1846 to serve in the Mexican-American War. He had an avid interest in the military and raised a unit in 1852, which the state legislature disbanded. When tensions began rising during the years before the Civil War, he raised another unit in 1857, which he trained well. When war broke out, he did not immediately favor secession. But when the southern states began seceding, he and his men joined the cause. Using his corps of "Lexington Riflemen" as a nucleus, he soon raised a unit, the 2nd Kentucky Cavalry Regiment. This unit fought at the Battle of Shiloh. On July 4, 1862, Morgan launched the first of his Kentucky raids. This successful action resulted in the capture of over a thousand Federal troops and the requisitioning of tons of Union supplies and hundreds of horses. A second series of raids against Union Major General William S. Rosecrans supply lines disrupted the Union troops and created havoc in the Union command in Kentucky. The success of these raids encouraged his foray into Indiana.
The Crossing
Morgan launched his raid from Burkesville, Kentucky, which is near the Tennessee/Kentucky state line. The beginning of this raid coincided with General Lee's Battle of Gettysburg far to the northeast. From Burkesville, the troops rode north to Brandenburg, Kentucky. He had already scouted the Ohio to find suitable places to cross and had settled on this site. His soldiers commandeered two riverboats on July 7 and by the next day; they moved north towards Corydon and the only Civil War battle to occur on Indiana soil.
Visitors can visit the battlefield here:
Battle of Corydon Memorial Park
100 Old Hwy 135 SW
Corydon, IN 47112

After Corydon
Morgan did not rest after his victory at Corydon. He continued east, crossing Harrison, Washington, Scott, Jennings, Jefferson, Ripley and Dearborn counties. Corydon’s townspeople cared for Morgan’s wounded soldiers from the battle, using the old Presbyterian Church as a hospital.
The Indiana portion of the raid has been mapped into an Auto Tour. The John Hunt Morgan Heritage Trail traces the route of Morgan’s Raiders through Indiana as it fled through the countryside into Ohio.
Find out more Morgan's Raiders in Indiana here.

This article excerpted from the author's book;
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South Central Edition


For more on Morgan in Dearborn County, see
Morgan's Raid in Dearborn County

This Day in Indiana History - September 23, 1902 - President Theodore Roosevelt Undergoes Surgery In Indianapolis After Giving Speech

A Day in Indiana History - September
A Day in Indiana History - September
September 23, 1902 - President Theodore Roosevelt Undergoes Surgery In Indianapolis After Giving Speech
President Theodore Roosevelt had begun an eighteen-day speaking tour of Midwestern cities to help elect Republican candidates to Congress during the 1902 off-year elections. A street car accident in Pittsfield, Massachusetts had given him a severe leg injury. By the time the President reached Indianapolis, doctors decided he needed surgery after he gave his scheduled speech.
The Accident
The day of September 3 had dawned bright and beautiful. Roosevelt decided that he wanted to take a carriage ride through the streets to enjoy the city and the day. City officials had ordered the streetcar lines to halt operations as a safety measure. Roosevelt boarded the carriage in company with Massachusetts governor Winthrop M. Crane, his secretary and a Secret Service agent driver. As the carriage rolled peacefully alongside the trolley line that ran down the middle of the street, a streetcar came careening down the street as a high speed. The trolley smacked into the carriage, killing the FBI agent driver, William Craig. Craig was the first Secret Service agent killed in the line of duty. The accident injured Roosevelt's leg and bloodied his face.
Continuing the Tour
The stoic Roosevelt continued the tour, traveling to New York by train, and then to Cincinnati, Ohio. Upon his arrival at Cincinnati, Roosevelt was having trouble standing. At his next stop, in Detroit, he left suddenly left a press conference to go to his hotel room to go to bed. He continued the tour, giving speeches to enthusiastic crowds in Logansport, Indiana and then in Noblesville. By the time he got to Noblesville, it was apparent that he was seriously ill. Noblesville officials notified Indianapolis authorities that Roosevelt needed medical attention, so when he arrived in Indianapolis there were four surgeons waiting to meet him at the train. He managed a brief speech at the Columbia Club on Monument Circle before authorities rushed him to St. Vincent Hospital for surgery.
The Surgery
The abscessed wound had swollen to a lump the size of a man's hand. Roosevelt refused anesthetic for the painful surgery and endured the pain while surgeons scraped and poked the wound until it drained. The doctor had to penetrate the injury three times before he had successfully emptied the pus from the wound. During the procedure, Roosevelt had only asked for a glass of water.
Canceling the Tour
The surgery was a success; however, the doctors advised that he rest for two weeks to recover. Roosevelt canceled the remainder of the tour and returned to Washington DC to recuperate.

Thursday, September 22, 2016

Dillsboro Historical Marker

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South East Edition
Dillsboro Historical Marker

Inscription.
The town was laid out by Mathias Whetstone in 1830, and named for General James Dill, soldier in the War of 1812, first county recorder, a member of the Indiana 1816 Constitutional Convention, military associate and friend of Generals William Henry Harrison, Arthur St. Clair and Captain Samuel C. Vance.

Erected 1976 by Dearborn County Bicentennial Committee.

Location. 39° 1.162' N, 85° 3.662' W.
Marker is in Dillsboro, Indiana, in Dearborn County.
Marker is at the intersection of Front Street and Bank Street, on the left when traveling north on Front Street.
Located at the Town Office and Fire Station.
Marker is in this post office area: Dillsboro IN 47018, United States of America.

Brief History
Early settlers to southeast Indiana settled along the Laughery Creek valley. Sometime in 1816, a group of settlers from Springfield, Ohio filtered into the area that became Dillsboro. Mathias Whetstone laid out Dillsboro on March 16, 1830. The plat included sixteen lots.  William Williamson donated land for a log church, which became the Hopewell Presbyterian Church sometime around 1826. The cemetery remains, however the congregation moved to Dillsboro later on.
Mathias Whetstone (July 7, 1821 - ?)
The son of John and Susan (Ramer) Whetstone, Mathias was native to Cincinnati, Ohio. He married Nancy Parker on October 4, 1844. The author could find little additional information about Mr. Whetstone.

This Day in Indiana - September 22, 1853 - First Boat to Travel Entire Length of Wabash-Erie Canal Reaches Evansville

A Day in Indiana History - September
A Day in Indiana History - September
September 22, 1853 - First Boat to Travel Entire Length of Wabash-Erie Canal Reaches Evansville
The  first ship to travel the entire length of the Wabash and Erie Canal, the Pennsylvania, arrived in Evansville on September 22, 1853. The longest canal in the United States and the second largest in the world now connected the Great Lakes with the Ohio River.
The Wabash and Erie
In the dawning years of the Nineteenth Century, the quest for fast, cheap transportation of freight over long distances seemed in reach with the construction and economic success of the Erie Canal. The Erie Canal connected New York City with the Great Lakes. It spurred New York's growth as a major commercial center. It also provided encouragement more canal construction across the United States. Landlocked states like Indiana seized on canals as the answer to open markets in inland cities that lacked navigable rivers. The Wabash and Erie was the first of these projects tackled by Indiana.
The Proposed Canal
The proposed canal was a grand project. It would span 468 miles across Indiana and Ohio, connecting it the Erie Canal via the Great Lakes with Evansville on the Ohio River. The Wabash and Erie actually consisted of four main canals, the Miami and Erie Canal, the Wabash and Erie Canal, the Cross Cut Canal and the Central Canal.
Miami and Erie Canal
The 274-mile Miami and Erie Canal connected Toledo, Ohio on Lake Erie with Cincinnati, Ohio on the Ohio River. Workers commenced construction in 1825 and finished in 1845. When complete, the canal had nineteen aqueducts, three guard locks, 103 canal locks and multiple feeder canals. The canal was profitable, but not as profitable as the state of Ohio hoped. Competition from railroads ended canal commercial operations by 1913.
Wabash and Erie
This canal began at Junction, Ohio and to Terre Haute. Junction received its name because the Wabash and Erie joined the Miami and Erie Canal in the town. The town flourished during the 1840's through the 1850's until the railroads began displacing the canals.
Cross Cut Canal
The Cross Cut Canal continued the Wabash and Erie route from Terre Haute to Worthington, Indiana.
Central Canal
The Central Canal completed the link from Worthington to Evansville. This was the last link completed in 1853.
Construction Begins
Because many credit George Washington with the suggestion that a canal be built through the region, the builders chose the 100th anniversary of his birth as the date to begin construction of the huge enterprise. Thus, on February 22, 1832 construction crews broke ground for the Wabash and Erie Canal.
Excerpted from the author’s book:
A Day in Indiana History – March

Wednesday, September 21, 2016

Aurora - Dearborn County Historical Marker


By Ginger Drenning, August 23, 2009

Aurora Historical Marker

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South East Edition
Inscription.
Aurora was laid out by Jesse L. Holman, trustee for the “Aurora Association for Internal Improvements” in 1819. Judge Holman was an early statesman, preacher, educator, and Federal Justice.
His son, U.S. Congressman William S. Holman served this district many years and was called “the Watchdog of the Treasury”.
 Erected 1976 by Dearborn County Bicentennial Committee.
 Location. 39° 3.144' N, 84° 53.848' W. Marker is in Aurora, Indiana, in Dearborn County. Marker is on Route 56 south of 5th Street, on the right when traveling north.
South Edge of Aurora - in public parking area along the Ohio River at river's edge.
Marker is in this post office area: Aurora IN 47001, United States of America

Brief History

Jesse Lynch Holman (October 24, 1784 – March 18, 1842)
The son of Henry Holeman and Jane Gordon, Jessy was a native of the frontier near Danville, Kentucky. After reading law, the Kentucky bar admitted him in 1805. Holman practiced law first at Carrollton, Kentucky. After moving to New Castle and Frankfort, he moved to a site near current Aurora, Indiana in 1811. He built a two story log home overlooking the Ohio River he called Veraestau.
Politics and Law
Indiana Territorial Governor William Henry Harrison appointed Holman as prosecuting attorney for Dearborn County and  judge of the second judicial circuit in 1814. He also served as a member of the Territorial legislative assembly. After statehood, he served on the circuit court and on the Indiana Supreme court until 1830.
Return to Private Life
He went back to Verastau in 1831 to reopen his law office. Holman became an ordained Baptist minister in 1834, after an unsuccessful bid for the United States Senate. His later efforts led to the founding of  Indiana University, Franklin College, and the Indiana Historical Society. He also wrote a novel, The Prisoners of the Niagara. This was published in 1810. He founded the Indiana Bible Society on June 4, 1831.
Federal Judge
Holman's last public post was as appointee to the U.S. District Court for the District of Indiana by President Andrew Jackson in 1835. He held this post until his death in 1842.
Veraestau
Holman added a brick addition to the structure. The cabin burned down in 1837. Holman's son bought the property, salvaged the brick addition and added a one story Greek Revival structure. After later additions, the Holman family owned the home for 125 years. The Holmans sold the home to Cornelius O’Brien, a Lawrenceburg businessman. His daughter, Mary O'Brien Gibson, deeded Verestau to the Indiana Landmarks. The home has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places and serves as the regional Southeast Field Office  for Indiana Landmarks. The home is available for rent for weddings and events.
 Veraestau Historic Site
 4696 Veraestau Lane
 Aurora, IN 47001-9406
 812-926-0983
veraestau@indianalandmarks.org

This article excerpted from the author's book:
A Day in Indiana History - June

This Day in Indiana History - September 21, 1975 – Fairmont Historical Museum Dedicated - Grant County

A Day in Indiana History - September
A Day in Indiana History - September
September 21, 1975 – Fairmont Historical Museum Dedicated - Grant County
Located in the Fairmont's historic Patterson House, the Fairmount Historical Museum contains extensive exhibits of famous sons James Dean and Jim Davis as well as historical memoribilia from Fairmont High School and Fairmont Academy. Former students of these schools provided the inspiration for the museum.
Fairmont Academy
The Society of Friends, or Quakers, opened Fairmont Academy in 1885. The school operated until 1923, when it closed.
Fairmont High School
Commissioned on April 25, 1898, the school graduated its first class in 1900. The quality of education provided by Fairmont Academy and Fairmont High School produced graduates that included  three college preseidents, authors, scientists, artists, actors and inventors. The Who's Who of America's lists of famous people that are alumni of Fairfield schools is fourteen times higher than the national average. The school closed in 1969.
Jim Davis (July 28, 1945 - )
The son of James William "Jim" Davis and Anna Catherine "Betty" Carter Davis, Jim is a native of Fairmont, Indiana. His boyhood spent on a small Indiana farm with numerous farm cats as companions served as the inspiration for the popular comic strip, Garfield. On June 19, 1978, Garfield debuted in forty-one United State newspapers. The comic strip's creator, Jim Davis, had created what would become one of the world's most widely syndicated cartoon strips.
James Dean (February 8, 1931 – September 30, 1955)
The son of Winton Dean and Mildred Marie Wilson, James was native to Marion, Indiana. His father, a dental technician, moved the family to Santa Monica, California. James lived in Santa Monica until after his mother's death in 1938, when James was seven. His father, unable to care for him, sent him to live with his sister Ortense and her husband, Marcus Winslow in Fairmont, Indiana. While in Fairmont, Dean studied drama and public speaking as well as playing basketball and baseball. After graduation, he returned to California where he developed an acting career. His starring roles in three movies, Rebel Without a Cause, East of Eden and Giant transformed him into a cultural icon. He would die in a tragic automobile accident on September 30, 1955.
Patterson House
Listed in National Register of Historic Places in 1979, the house served as the home of three prominent Fairmont residents, Nixon Winslow, Levi Scott, and Joseph Patterson. Located at 203 E. Washington Street, the  Fairmount Historical Museum purchased the home in 1977.
The Fairmount Historical Museum
Residents took inspiration for the museum from former students of Fairmont High School and Academy who wanted to visit their old school. The unused building still contained many photos, trophies and other memoribilia from the school. Fairmont residents decided to preserve this treasured material, and created the Fairmount Historical Museum in 1975. The museum occupied the Patterson House on September 5, 1983. In addition to a large collection of local memoribila, the museum also contains items related to famous sons James Dean and Jim Davis. The museum hosts a huge, three-day event call the "Museum Days" Festival. This event features a car show with approximatily 2000 cars, a James Dean Look-A-Like contest, showings of his movies and numerous other events. Fairmount Historical Museum
P.O. Box 92
203 East Washington Street
Fairmount, IN 46928
(765) 948-4555

Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Dover, Indiana

A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
Dover, Indiana
Elevation 938 ft
ZIP code 47022
First settlled in 1815, Dover is located at the intersection of Indiana State Road 1 and North Dearborn Road. Confederate General General John T. Morgan and his troops passed through Dover on July 13, 1863 as he passed through southern Indiana on his way to Ohio. Dover is also home to the second oldest Roman Catholic church in Indiana, St. John The Baptist Church. Dearborn County has placed two historical markers in Dover that tell the story of Morgan and the Church. 

This Day in Indiana History - September 20, 1856 - LaGrange County Rangers Organized


A Day in Indiana History - September
A Day in Indiana History - September
September 20, 1856 - LaGrange County Rangers Organized
The newly formed counties of northern Indiana became a hotbed for criminals. The lack of law enforcement encouraged the formation of criminal gangs that engaged in various illegal activities. Stealing horses, counterfeiting, gambling, robbery, arson and murder were common crimes. The Indiana General Assembly passed an act in 1852 that allowed local citizens to form companies to find arrest and deal with these criminals. This began the so-called Regulator movement in northern Indiana that saw the formation of several of these groups. The first to form was the LaGrange County Rangers, for the “detection and apprehension of horse thieves and other nefarious operators.” Other groups soon followed with names like the Noble County Invincibles, Angola Regulators, Jackson Prairie Horsethief Detecting Society and Self Protectors of Springfield.  Thirty-six companies would form in northern Indiana. The law required each of these companies to form a constitution and bylaws. They also elected officers. The act authorized these companies to detect and arrest criminals. It did not allow them to try them or pass sentence on them.

Monday, September 19, 2016

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums

South East Edition 
West Harrison, Indiana
Area -  Total 0.23 sq mi
Elevation - 518 ft
Population (2010) - 289
ZIP code - 47060
Area code - 812

Laid out in mid to late December 1813, West Harrison is the sister city to Harrison, Ohio, located across the Indiana/Ohio State line. It is about eighteen miles from Lawrenceburg, Indiana, via I-274 and I-74. Early settlers in the area found numerous Indian mounds scattered across the landscape. Most of the early building lots had the remains of these mounds.
West Harrison, Indiana sits on the banks of the Whitewater River on the Indiana/Ohio State Line just west of Harrison, Ohio. State Street, which runs on a north south axis, is the state line and the official boundary between the two towns.
The Indiana and Ohio Railroad runs through West Harrison as it connects Cincinnati, Ohio with Brookville, Indiana.
West Harrison has access to Interstate 74 and US 52 via State Street/Old Highway 52, which joins the Interstate, and the US Highway.

Town of West Harrison 
Town Hall
100 Railroad Ave.
West Harrison, Indiana
(812) 637-5261

This Day in Indiana History - September 19, 1892 - New State Fairgrounds Opens on 38th Street



A Day in Indiana History - September
A Day in Indiana History - September
September 19, 1892 - New State Fairgrounds Opens on 38th Street
The Indiana State Fair, begun in 1852, opened in its third location on September 19, 1892 in the rural area on 38th Street on the north side of Indianapolis. Previous locations at Military Park and Camp Morton had become too small.
Indiana State Fair
The Indiana General Assembly authorized the Indiana State Board of Agriculture on February 14, 1851; with the intention of encourage agricultural growth in the state. The Board organized a State Fair to promote farmers and their products. The first State Fair in Indiana, and the sixth in the United States, took place on October 20 - 22, 1852 at Military Park. 30,000 people attended that first fair. Visitors had 1,365 exhibits featuring a variety of farm products and equipment.
Military Park
Founded in 1820 to train troops that would fight in the Black Hawk War, the fourteen-acre park was initially named "Military Ground." During the Civil War, the park became Camp Sullivan and found use as a training ground for Union Soldiers. The grounds were converted into a park again after the war and today are part of White River State Park. The Congressional Medal of Honor Memorial is on the south edge of the park, along the Canal. The Shelter house in the park hosts several concerts and other events throughout the year.
 Camp Morton
 By 1860, the fair had outgrown Military Park. A thirty-eight acre site bounded by Central Avenue and Nineteenth, Twenty-second, and Talbott Streets became the site of the Indiana State Fair in 1860. The outbreak of the Civil War halted the State Fair in 1861, when the Fairgrounds became the site of Camp Morton. Used to train Union troops at first, the state converted it into a prisoner of war camp in 1863, a role it served until 1865.
Traveling Show
From 1865 until 1892, the Fair took place in several locations in the state, as well as at Camp Morton in Indianapolis. The cities that hosted the fair during those years included New Albany, Fort Wayne, Terra Haute and Madison. Since a central location would allow more Hoosiers to visit the fair, the State Board of Agriculture purchased the Jay G. Voss farm on 38th Street on the north side of Indianapolis. The fairground featured seventy-two buildings, a 6,000-seat grandstand, and a one-mile racetrack. The Indiana State Fair has taken place at these fairgrounds annually since moving into this location. The fairground serves as the site for many other events throughout the year.
Indiana State Fairgrounds & Event Center
1202 E. 38Th St.
Indianapolis, In 46205
Phone | 317-927-7500

Friday, September 16, 2016

This Day in Indiana History - September 16, 1822 - William Conner purchased 80 acres in Marion County

A Day in Indiana History - September
A Day in Indiana History - September
September 16, 1822 - William Conner purchased 80 acres in Marion County
William Conner purchased an eighty-acre tract of land, adding to his already considerable land holdings. This tract he used to establish a trading post for local Amerindians and the French fur traders that still passed through the area. This tract is the probable location for “Trader’s Point."
William Conner (December 10, 1777 – August 28, 1855)
The son of Richard and Margaret Boyer Conner, William was a native of Lichtenau, Ohio. The British moved the family to Fort Detroit for protection during the Revolutionary War. He and his brother James moved into the central Indiana area in 1800. While small, he and his brother had lived in close association with the native tribes, so they were familiar with their customs. During this early period, William served in the Indiana militia, and acted as interpreter to the Amerindians for Governor William Henry Harrison. He also had six children with a Delaware woman named Mekingis, who was the daughter of a native chief, William Anderson. When the Delaware left Indiana for an area west of the Mississippi River in 1820, Mekingis took her six children along. There is disagreement among historians whether she and William were legally married. After his family departed, he married Elizabeth Chapman. The two had ten children together. Conner had built a trading post just south of present day Noblesville and built several trading routes from central Indiana to the Ohio River. The council that chose the site for Indianapolis met at his trading post, as did the Hamilton County commissioners during their first meetings.
A portion of this article excerpted from the author's book:
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - Central Edition

Thursday, September 15, 2016

Saint Leon, Indiana

A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
Saint Leon, Indiana
County - Dearborn
Area - Total 6.99 sq mi
Population (2010) - 678
Area code - 812
Located at the intersection of Indiana State Roads 46 and 1, St. Leon also has access to Interstate 74 at Exit 164. Local lore suggests that the town derives its name from St. Leon Bembo. The town's Pole Raising event has become famous state wide as the only remaining pole raising ceremony in Indiana.
St. Leon Bembo (Birth Date Unknown - c. 1188)
Leon Bembo was a Catholic Saint born in Venice, Italy. He served as a diplomat to one of the Doge's of Venice. The Doge was the title of an elected leader who served for life. St. Leon was injured in religious riots, after which he retired to a monastery.
Pole Raising
St. Leon is the only town in Indiana that still holds a "Pole Raising," ceremony. The Pole Raising is a quadrennial event that takes place during Presidential election years. Drawn from the traditional "Liberty Pole," of the years predating the American Revolution, the Pole Raising became popular in the Presidential election of Democrat Andrew Jackson and National Republican (Whig) John Q. Adams.  The Democrats used a hickory pole, in honor of their candidate's nickname, Old Hickory. The Democrats first used the donkey as a symbol during this election. The symbol originated when the opposition Whigs labeled Jackson a jackass. The Democrats adopted the symbol unofficially during that election. It became the official symbol in 1870. The Whigs adopted a yellow poplar (Liriodendron tulipfera) as their pole and the log cabin as their symbol. The Pole Raising became a popular quadrennial event during the remainder of the Nineteenth and early Twentieth Centuries. Parades, barbeques and other political speeches accompanied the pole-raising event. The St. Leon Pole Raising uses a former Democratic emblem with Indiana roots, the Rooster.
Liberty Pole
Typically, a Liberty Pole was a tall wooden pole with a Phrygian Cap on top. A Phrygian Cap was a cap worn by freed slaves in Rome. The symbol arose in 44 BC after the assassination of Emperor Julius Caesar. A Liberty Pole marked a meeting place of the Sons of Liberty and was a symbol of their protests. British troops frequently cut these poles down, which was a highly provocative act.
St. Leon Pole Raising
Since this is a Democratic Party event, a traditional hickory pole is used. During the morning of the event residents trek into the woods, choose a hickory tree, and cut it down using the traditional crosscut saw. They fasten a flag with the Rooster emblem to the pole, as well as an American Flag. They suspend the pole between two wagons, after carrying it back into town, and parade it through the streets. After the parade, workers raise the pole using traditional rope methods to a chorus of cheers. The pole remains in place until Election Day. For more information on the St. Leon Pole Raising, contact:
St. Leon Pole Raising

The Democratic Rooster
The Indiana Whig's derisive chant to their opponent, Joseph Chapman during the 1840 elections turned into an emblem for the Indiana Democratic Party and later the National Party.
Joseph Chapman
A native of Ohio, Chapman migrated to Indiana to Rush County. In 1829 he moved to Hancock County where built the first tavern in the new town of Greenfield in 1834. He married twice, the first time to Jane Curry, with whom he had six children. Mrs. Curry passed away and he married Matilda Agnes. That union produced five children. He entered politics as a Jacksonian Democrat and won the 1832 election as town clerk. In 1837, he gained election to the Indiana House of Representatives. He won reelection four times. His 1840 election produced the Democratic Party emblem.
“Crow, Chapman, Crow!”
Birth of the Symbol
Chapman gained renown for his boasting style of speech. The term for boasting at the time was to accuse someone of "crowing," in reference to the raucous bird. When Chapman would speak, the Whigs took up the derisive chant, “Crow, Chapman, Crow.” The Democrats picked up on this and turned it around, using the crow as the emblem for his campaign. Chapman won that election, prompting the Indiana Democrats to adopt the symbol. The National Democrats soon adopted it. Though the jackass, first used on Democrats during Andrew Jackson's campaign in 1828, became the unofficial emblem in 1870, the rooster still saw use after that. As late as 1944, Franklin Roosevelt still used it. Many Democrats still use the emblem in some areas of the United States.
Excerpted from the author's book:
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - East Central Edition

Dearborn County has erected an historical marker honoring the event.
Text:
On this site, since 1892, during each Presidential election campaign, a tall hickory pole bearing an American Flag and Democrat "Rooster," is raised by manpower alone. Once widespread custom dating from 1828 campaign of Andrew "Old Hickory," Jackson.

Saint Leon
7282 Church Lane
West Harrison, IN 47060
(812) 576-5368


Day in Indiana History - September 15, 1849 - Charter Granted to Madison's Fair Play Fire Company Number One

A Day in Indiana History - September
A Day in Indiana History - September
September 15, 1849 - Charter Granted to Madison's Fair Play Fire Company Number One
Platted in 1809, Madison had no fire company until 1821, when local citizens formed the United Volunteer Fire Company. City officials decided to create a paid fire company in 1826. this company lasted less than a year and the project abandonded. Many of the former members of the original United Volunteer Fire Company joined together and organized the Fair Play Fire Company No. 1, charter granted on September 15, 1849.
Still in Existence
The Fair Play Fire Company Number One still exists in a station made from converted street car barn. The Ones, as locals call them, occupied that site in 1888. They added a fifty-five foot bell tower topped by a weather vane they called  “Little Jimmy.”  A storm in 1997 damaged this vane, and it has been replaced by a new hand made copper vane. The Fair Play Fire Company Number One is the oldest active fire company in Indiana.

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

Day In Indiana History - September 14, 1822 - Gray Squirrel Migrations Destroy Crops

A Day in Indiana History - September
A Day in Indiana History - September
September 14, 1822 - Gray Squirrel Migrations Destroy Crops
Squirrel migrations in the early times of settlement in North America were common occurrences. During these mass movements, thousands of squirrels moved en masse through the forests in late summer and autumn. In Indiana, there were two recorded migration, 1822 and 1845. The 1822 migration, which began on September 14, was the most devastating.
Vast Forests
The eastern region of the United States at the time of settlement was one almost continuous forest. Biologists feel that migrations in pre-colonial times were common; however, the Amerindians have made little or no mention of them. Squirrels could, in theory, migrate from the eastern seaboard to the Mississippi River and never leave the leave the leaf canopy.
Squirrel Migrations and Corn
Most scientists believe that the squirrels migrated when their massive numbers created pressure on food supplies. At these times, the squirrels would migrate in huge numbers from one area to another. When European colonization began, these migrations would cause serious problems. One of the most important crops the colonists grew was corn, a crop obtained from their Amerindian neighbors early in the colonization period. Squirrels love corn and one squirrel can eat a lot of corn. Thousands of squirrels descending on a cornfield can result in a total loss of the crop in a short period.
Squirrel Migration of 1822
The squirrels began swarming across the forests and cornfields of southern and central Indiana on September 14, 1822, according to accounts. The squirrel migration, which locals soon called the Great Squirrel Invasion, moved across cornfields. As the thousands of rodents traveled, they ate. The hungry animals destroyed many fields. Some farmers patrolled their fields with rifles, killing them in great numbers. Some reported that these squirrels, normally a tasty treat, were worthless as food.
Modern Migrations
In modern times, squirrel migrations have become rare. There have been none reported in Indiana since 1845, with the last known migration near Lake Michigan in 1985. The squirrel populations today are much lower than in the Nineteenth Century, probably resulting in a more stabeler population and food supply.

Tuesday, September 13, 2016

Moores Hill, Indiana

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums

South East Edition 
Moores Hill, Indiana
County - Dearborn
Township - Sparta
Area Total - 0.5 sq mi
Elevation 991 ft
Population (2000)
Total 635
ZIP code 47032
Area code(s) 812

Alan Moore, owner of Moore's Mill, and Andrew Stevens platted the small town of Moore's Hill in 1839. It consisted of the gristmill and nine lots. Moore's Hill College opened its doors as a denominational college in 1907. In 1908, Carnegie Hall was constructed by the university to serve as an academic building. It later served as an elementary and high school. It is now utilized as a museum. The college survived until 1917 when it relocated to Evansville and became Evansville University.

Moore's Hill lies near Indiana State Road 350, which connects Aurora, Indiana to Osgood Indiana and the CSX Rail Line that links Aurora Indiana to St. Louis Missouri.

Salatin’s Orchard

Monday, September 12, 2016

Greendale, Indiana

A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
Greendale, Indiana
County - Dearborn
Area Total - 6.1 sq mi
Elevation - 528 ft
Population (2000) - Total 4,296
ZIP code - 47025
Area code(s) - 812

History
Revolutionary war veteran Captain John Crandall settled on the ridge above the Ohio River, and then called Pleasant Ridge, shortly after the 1795 Treaty of Greenville between General Anthony Wayne and the various Amerindian tribes of current Indiana and Ohio. George Rabb, another early settler, also established himself on the Ridge. Stephen Ludlow platted Greendale, Indiana in 1852 on a high ridge that overlooks the Ohio River Valley. It is adjacent to Lawrenceburg, Indiana that it also overlooks. Greendale has four public parks. Dearborn Trail begins at the intersection of East William and High Street in Greendale.
Transportation
State Road 1 creases the north edge of the town as it wends its way to State Road 46 and Interstate 74. Indiana State Road 1 begins at an intersection with US Route 50 on the south edge of town.
For dining, lodging and shopping opportunities in Greendale, contact:

City of Greendale
500 Ridge Avenue
Greendale, IN 47025
812-537-9219
info@cityofgreendale.net

Attractions
Danny Miller Park
Greendale Park - Public Pool
Lorey Park
Schnebelt Park
Greendale Cinema
Dearborn Trails – Aurora – Lawrenceburg – Greendale Indiana

© Indiana Places 2016

This Day in Indiana History - September 12, 1904 - Union Traction Terminal Opens

A Day in Indiana History - September
A Day in Indiana History - September
September 12, 1904 - Union Traction Terminal Opens
Indianapolis Traction Terminal evolved into what many believed was the largest interurban station in the world when the Union Traction Terminal station opened on September 12, 1904.
The Interurban rail lines of the late Nineteenth and early Twentieth Centuries provided the first mass transit system connecting the rural areas with the cities. In the era before the automobile and paved highways, the interurban lines provided fast, cheap transportation across not just Indiana, but the nation as well. The interurban railways rose in the late 1880's and reached their prominence by 1925. The rise of the automobile and paved highways started their demise.
Interurban
An interurban was a rail line that used electricity for power and operated between cities. The 1905 Census definition was "a street railway having more than half its trackage outside municipal limits." this definition separated an interurban from suburban railroads. Indiana State Senator Charles L. Henry coined the term interurban at the World's Fair in Chicago in 1893 while watching a demonstration railway.
Indianapolis Traction Terminal
The train shed at the terminal was 133 feet by 185 feet long and had nine tracks. A nine-story office building towered over the terminal. The lines using the terminal radiated out from Louisville, Kentucky, Fort Wayne, Indiana, and Dayton, Ohio. At its height in the early Twentiteth Century many experts felt that over 500 cars a day used the station. The rise fo the automobile caused the decline of the interurban trains.
A portion of this article excerpted from the author's book:
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition

Sunday, September 11, 2016

Short Indiana Road Trips - Volume 1

Short Indiana Road Trips - Volume 1
Short Indiana Road Trips - Volume 1

Short Indiana Road Trips - Volume 1 is a guidebook that includes short, one day road trips that Hoosiers can enjoy in Indiana. This small atlas of tourism destinations provides information on thirteen travel destinations in the Hoosier state.

State parks, local parks, museums and wildlife refuges all make interesting places to explore. This guide will help you find good day trip destinations for you to visit and enjoy. Short Indiana Road Trips - Volume 1 includes basic information fort these destinations and provides contact information for interested visitors to find out more. State parks, local parks, museums and wildlife refuges all make interesting places to explore. This guide will help you find good day trip destinations for you to visit and enjoy. Short Indiana Road Trips - Volume 1 includes basic information fort these destinations and provides contact information for interested visitors to find out more.

Available On:
Kindle
Kindle Softbound
Smashwords
Smashwords - 20% Free Sample
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble - Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Apple
Create Space - Softcover Book
Paul Wonning's Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Smashwords Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Apple
Paul Wonning's Books on Kobo
Paul Wonning's Books on Barnes and Noble

© Mossy Feet Books 2016

This Day in Indiana History - September 11, 1847 - Theodore Clement Steele Born

A Day in Indiana History - September
A Day in Indiana History - September
September 11, 1847 - Theodore Clement Steele Born
Theodore Clement Steele (September 11, 1847 – July 24, 1926)
Theodore Clement Steele, or T. C. Steele, was an Indiana artist through and through. He was the eldest child of saddle maker Samuel Hamilton and his wife Harriett Newell Evans Steele. The family resided in Gosport, Indiana until moving to Waveland in 1852. His art training began there, in Waveland Collegiate Institute. Following that the studied art at Asbury College in Wabash, Indiana, then at Chicago and Cincinnati. He returned to central Indiana to paint commission portraits.
Marriage, Family and Study in Germany
After marrying Mary Elizabeth Lakin, he moved to Battle Creek, Michigan. The family lived there until the birth of their second child, Daisy. He moved his family back to Indianapolis. In Indiana, he supported his family through commission portraits and commercial artwork. His friend, Herman Lieber, helped him go to Germany to study art and arranged finances for the family. Upon his return, Steele's skill and reputation grew. He painted mostly scenes from Indiana with the Muscatatuck River and other rural scenes his favorite. His frequent out of state expeditions provided him with more work for his palette and brush.
Reputation Grows
His art began to find an audience out of state. During the 1890's his career took off as he published The Steele Portfolio. His work began to appear in major studios and art shows in Chicago, St. Louis and Indianapolis. It was during the Chicago show that he became instrumental in forming the Hoosier Group of Indiana painters.
House of the Singing Winds
In 1899 Elizabeth died. In August 1907, Steele married Selma Neubacher. His search for landscape painting led him to Metamora, Indiana and the wild Whitewater River. After stays in Brookville, Vernon and Indianapolis, Steele found a secluded property in Brown County. They purchased the property and built the house they called House of the Singing Winds in 1907. Steele's paintings had been exhibited in international galleries and his fame was at its height. He built a studio and they planted gardens around the home. His presence near Nashville, Indiana attracted many other artists to the area. Thus began the Brown County Art Colony.
In 1916, Steele received an honorary doctorate from Indiana University. In 1922, he became the University’s first artist in residence.
After suffering a heart attack in 1925, he recovered and continued working. On July 24, 1926, he sickened and died at the House of the Singing Winds.
The House of the Singing Winds is now an extension of the Indiana State Museum and a State Historic Site.  It is open to the public six days a week. The home contains an extensive collection of his work. The gardens are open to the public and accessible by five hiking trails. His art studio is also open to the public.
Other Attractions
In addition to the House of the Singing Winds, the gardens and the art gallery visitors can enjoy the Dewar Log Cabin. Selma purchased this cabin from its site five miles away and reconstructed it on the property. She filled it with natural history displays. Visitors can also hike in the ninety-two acre Selma Steele Nature Preserve. Abundant wildlife, wild flowers and beautiful terrain provide a relaxing experience.
Special Events, Displays, Art Sales
The Friends of T.C. Steele State Historic Site provide guided tours of the home and grounds. They also conduct numerous special events, art shows, live plays and other events throughout the year. For more information, call the provided phone number or visit the website.
To get to T. C. Steele State Historic Site from Nashville travel on Indiana State Road 46 about seven miles west to T. C. Steele Road and turn left. Follow the signs.
TC Steele State Historic Site
4220 T.C. Steele Road
Nashville, IN 47448
Phone: 812.988.2785
This article excerpted from the author’s book:
A Visit to Brown County State Park

Friday, September 9, 2016

A Day in Indiana History - September

A Day in Indiana History - September
A Day in Indiana History - September
A Day in Indiana History - September

Learn about Indiana history a day at a time. Ideal for history lovers, Day in Indiana History – September teaches the historical facts about Indiana in an easy to understand format. Indiana’s bicentennial approaches us during the year 2016. This event presents an ideal time to teach the history of the state of Indiana. Formed from the vast Northwest Territory in 1803, the Indiana Territory eventually became five states. Indiana was the first of these states, achieving statehood on December 16, 1816. Explore Indiana’s rich history from its early days of French settlement.

This volume includes the following articles:

September 04, 1838 - Potawatamie Trail of Death Begins

September 09, 1890 - Harland Sanders Born Near Henryville, Indiana

September 11, 1847 - Theodore Clement Steele Born

September 13, 1803 - Jeffersonville Post Office Established

September 26, 1774 - Johnny Appleseed Born

The Indiana Bicentennial History Series will present the history of Indiana in a series of short articles that describe important facts and events in the history of the State of Indiana on a day-to-day format. The series presents those that wish to home school students about the history of the State of Indiana an ideal history book to do just that.

Available On:
Kindle
Kindle Softbound
Smashwords
Smashwords - 20% Free Sample
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble - Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Apple
Create Space - Softcover Book
Paul Wonning's Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Smashwords Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Apple
Paul Wonning's Books on Kobo
Paul Wonning's Books on Barnes and Noble

© Mossy Feet Books 2016

Indiana Historical Marker - Harland Sanders Born Near Henryville, Indiana

A Day in Indiana History - September
A Day in Indiana History - September
Title of Marker: 
Birthplace and Childhood Home of Col. Harland Sanders
Location:
South side of SR 160 & exit 16 of northbound I-65, Henryville. (Clark County, Indiana) State Road 160 intersects US 31 in downtown Henryville.
Installed by: 
Erected 1987 by these Local Franchisees: Mr. & Mrs. Robert Bagshaw Mr. & Mrs. William Bridges Mr. & Mrs. William Bright Mr. & Mrs. Roy Burchel Mr. & Mrs. Lee Cummings Mr. & Mrs. Ralph Fordyce Mr. & Mrs. Henry Gilley Mr. & Mrs. Robert Heil Mr. & Mrs. Everitt Houchen Pauline Houchen & Joe Ann Mr. & Mrs. Charles Howser Mr. & Mrs. William Mullins Mr. & Mrs. Marvin Payne Mr. & Mrs. Raymond Popp Mr. & Mrs. Henry Rothbaur Mr. & Mrs. Bud Stotts Mr. & Mrs. Hershel Wells Mr. & Mrs. T. J. White.
Marker ID #:
10.1987.1
Marker Text: 
Founder of Kentucky Fried Chicken

Brief History
Colonel Harland David Sanders (September 9, 1890 – December 16, 1980)
Harland Sanders' life exemplifies the "rags to riches" story that is so much of the American experience. Colonel Sanders rose above poverty, failure and economic depression to eventually find success and launch the modern fast food franchise model. His resume included stints as a life insurance salesman, steam engine stoker, railway worker, secretary and entrepreneur. His fiery temper got him involved in brawls and made him the bane of early franchise holders that did not adhere to his strict standards.
Early Provider
His mother, Margaret Ann Dunlevy Sanders, gave birth to him in their four-room home near Henryville, Indiana. He was the eldest of four children borne by her and her husband, Wilbur David Sanders. Wilbur died suddenly from a fever when Harland was five. His mother found work in a cannery and was absent for long periods, leaving Harland to care for the younger children. During these years, Harland learned how to cook using food the children foraged while their mother was away. At age ten, two local farmers hired the boy as a farmhand. His mother eventually remarried and the family moved to Greenwood, Indiana.
Seventh Grade Dropout
In the seventh grade, Harland dropped out of school and moved to live with a farmer to do farm work. For a time he lived with an uncle in New Albany, working as a streetcar conductor. He falsified his age and joined the military in 1906. After serving as a teamster in Cuba, he received an honorary discharge and went to Alabama to serve stints as a blacksmith's helper and ash pan cleaner at a railroad. He eventually rose to become a fireman, stoking the steam engines with coal.
Lawyer, Ferry Boat Operator and Manufacturer
From Alabama Harland went to Tennessee. He worked days as a fireman and studied law at night at the La Salle Extension University. A fight with a co-worker cost him his job, so he moved on to Arkansas, married by now with two daughters. A son had died of tonsillitis. In Little Rock Arkansas, he became a lawyer until a courtroom brawl with his client ended his law career. He ended up again in Indiana, this time operating a ferry company that he established. The ferry operated between Jeffersonville and Louisville and did well. During this time, he also worked as a secretary for the Columbus, Indiana Chamber of Commerce. He resigned from that job, sold the ferry company and used the funds to found a company that made acetylene lamps. This company failed.
The Beginnings of Kentucky Fried Chicken
Sanders ended up in North Corbin, Kentucky operating a service station that he rented free in exchange for a percentage of the sales. To make extra money, he started selling fried chicken, country ham and country fried steak dinners. His chicken was a hit. His restaurant became so popular that Kentucky governor Ruby Laffoon commissioned him a Kentucky Colonel in 1935. During this time he was involved in a shoot-out in which his biggest competitor, Matt Stewart. Sanders, a Shell Oil official with Sanders, and Stewart got into an altercation over Stewart repainting some of Sander's signs. he was directing people to his station and away from Sanders. During the altercation, Stewart pulled a gun and shot the Shell Oil man, killing him. His murder conviction eliminated him as a competitor.
Perfection of the Recipe
By 1940, Sanders perfected his fried chicken recipe. He had opened a new 140-seat restaurant in Asheville, North Carolina. When the war started, the government started rationing gas for the war effort. All tourism stopped, forcing Sanders to close the restaurant.
Beginning of the Franchise Operation
In 1952, Sanders began selling franchises for his recipe. He would go to restaurants around the country and cook for the owner and employees. He often slept in his car while on these trips. If they liked the chicken, he would offer to sell them his franchise. He would claim a royalty of four cents per chicken. He sold his first franchise in 1952 to a restaurant owner in Salt Lake City, Utah. His fledgling company grew and by 1964, he sold the company to the Kentucky Fried Chicken Corporation. He received two million dollars for his company. At the time of the sale, the chain had over 600 franchises in the United States and overseas. The company went public with stock sales in 1966. Heublein Inc. acquired the company in 1971 for 250 million dollars. There were over 3500 franchises worldwide at that time.
Last Years in Louisville
Harland moved to Louisville, where he died of leukemia in 1980. His body laid in state at the state capitol in Frankfort. His grave lies in Cave Hill Cemetery in Louisville. At his death, there were an estimated 6000 Kentucky Fried Chicken franchises around the world. He did not do too badly for a poor farm boy from Henryville, Indiana.
This article excerpted from the author’s book:
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition



Thursday, September 8, 2016

This Day in Indiana History - September 08, 1823 - First Poorhouse in Knox County

A Day in Indiana History - September
A Day in Indiana History - September
September 08, 1823 - First Poorhouse in Knox County
Before welfare, unemployment insurance and food stamps, the county poor house existed to care for the mentally and physically disabled, the poor, unwed mothers and other unfortunates that could not take care of themselves. Every county had one in an era when care for the impoverished was a local affair. Most counties built large, stately brick structures to serve as the local poorhouse, poor farm or county infirmary, as the various local terms applied to them. The first of these in Indiana opened in Knox County in 1823.
Knox County Poorhouse

The General Assembly appointed David McClure, Thomas Emison, Samuel Chambers, Thomas Jordan, William Gamble, Abraham Kuykendall, James Watson and Henry Ruble to find suitable grounds and purchase them in 1820. This task was accomplished and the Knox County poor farm opened on September 8, 1823. In 1831, the Indiana legislature would approve poor houses in all counties. Since the poor farm was considered a sign of civilization, the counties were proud of their poor farms, built impressive structures to house the orphans, indigent, and disabled people in their care.