Saturday, December 31, 2016

Hoosier Dusty Files - December 31, 1821 - Brookville Road Authorized

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

December 31, 1821 - Brookville Road Authorized
The Indiana Historical Bureau has installed a historical marker in Marion County that addresses the Brookville Road.
Brookville Road
Location:
10622 Brookville Road, Indianapolis. (Marion County, Indiana)
Installed by:
Installed: 2004 Indiana Historical Bureau, Environmental Law & Policy Center of the Midwest, and Southeast Civic Association
Marker ID #:
ID# : 49.2004.1
Marker Text:
Side one:
On December 31, 1821, a 78-mile state road was authorized from the Ohio border to Indianapolis through Brookville, to be built with required citizen labor. Commissioners filed a survey report June 24, 1822 for the Brookville State Road. On January 24, 1828, a turnpike company was authorized to build an improved road by bidding out sections.
Side two:
Brookville Road was the principal route for goods and people from here to Cincinnati. Road travel was difficult in the 1800s, taking days to reach destinations. Taverns provided shelter and food for travelers. Along the road in Warren Township, Marion County, taverns were kept by David Woods in the 1820s and Nathan Harlan in the 1830s - 1840s.
Brief History By the Author
The road, authorized by the State Legislature on December 31, 1821, construction of the road commenced in 1828. Most of the road still exists as US 52. This road has been straightened and widened over the years, however orphan sections still survive.
Brookville
Surveyor Thomas Manwarring plated Brookville on August 8, 1808. Two men, Amos Butler and Jesse Brooks Thomas, owned the land the town occupied.
Amos Butler
Amos was the first person to register a deed for land in this beautiful spot between the East and West forks of the Whitewater River. He recorded his deed in 1804 and became the first documented settler of the town. Butler provided the greater part of the funds for the town.
Jesse Brooks Thomas
Thomas was the other landowner in town and named the town Brooks, his mother's maiden name. The name in the beginning was Brooksville, but over time, the name was shortened to Brookville.
Brookville
The town became the county seat of Franklin County in 1811. Growth was slow until the government opened the United States Land Office in the town in 1825. The town went into a slump when the office moved to Indianapolis in 1835. The Whitewater Canal opened in 1839, provided a temporary boost to the town, and attracted many new businesses.  Because of its location between the two branches of the Whitewater River, the town was subject to frequent floods. The construction of the Brookville Dam and Reservoir has alleviated this problem, as well as providing an economic boost to the town from the recreational opportunities provided by the reservoir.
For more information on Brookville and Franklin County dining, lodging, canoeing and shopping, visit:
P.O. Box 97
Brookville, IN 47012
Email: Info@Franklincountyin.Com
Excerpted from the author’s book:

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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© Paul Wonning

Friday, December 30, 2016

America's Dusty Files - December 30, 1731 - First Music Concert in Boston

A Year of Colonial American Frontier History
A Year of Colonial American Frontier History
December 30, 1731 - First Music Concert in Boston
Peter Pelham's parlor in his Boston home served at the scene of the first music concert in Boston and possibly the British North American colonies.
Peter Pelham (December 9, 1721 – April 28, 1805)
A native of London, England, Peter immigrated to Boston with his father, Peter, in 1726. His father apprenticed Peter to famous composer Charles Theodore Pachelbel. The two were the first professional musicians in the British colonies. The first concert would have taken place when Peter was ten.
Pachelbel migrated to Charlestown in 1736 and Pelham followed him there. Pelham returned to Boston around 1744 to become the organist at Trinity Church. The life of a professional musician during this time was not sufficient to provide a living. During his lifetime, Peter also was an engraver, artist, music teacher, jail keeper and owned a music store. He moved to Williamsburg, Virginia around 1770. He composed several pieces, of which none survive.

Indiana's history begins many decades before December 11, 1816 when Indiana became a state. The first foundations of Indiana's were laid with the voyages of Christopher Columbus and the settlement that came later. The American History A Day at A Time - 2015 series is in an easy to read "This Day in History," format and includes articles by the author from that series. The reader may read the articles as they appear, or purchase the book:
A Year of Colonial American Frontier History

Facebook
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© Paul Wonning 2016

Hoosier Dusty Files - December 30, 1861 - 40th Indiana Infantry Mustered

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

December 30, 1861 - 40th Indiana Infantry Mustered
The 40th Indiana Regiment organized at Lafayette, Indiana and mustered on December 30, 1861. The regiment departed Indiana immediately, moving to Bardstown, Kentucky. From there it moved to Nashville, Tennessee and thence into Alabama After duty in Indiana, the regiment returned to Tennessee.  When When Confederate General Braxton Bragg invaded Kentucky, the 40th went in pursuit. Returning to Tennesee, the 40th saw action at the Battle of Stones River in December 1862. It next saw major action at Chattanooga during the battles of Chicamaugua, Missionary Ridge and Lookout Mountain. Their enlistment expiring in December, the regiment reenlisted in January and returned to Indiana for a brief furlough. The regiment reassembled and moved to Cleveland, Tennessee in time to move against Atlanta during General Tecumseh Sherman's mart to the sea. The regiment saw action in all of the battles and skirmishes of that campaign. After Atlanta's capture, the Regiment returned to Tennesee to engage Confederate forces during the Battle of Nashville in December, 1864. The 40th took part in the Union Army's pursuit of Confederate General John Bell Hood's army as it retreated through Alabama. The regiment returned to Tennesee, then departed for New Orleans, crossing the Mississippi River to Texas. The regiment took quarters at Port Lavaca, Texas. The 40th mustered out on December 25, 1865, four years after it mustered in. Losses included 312 dead, 131 desertions and 29 missing in action.
Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
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© Paul Wonning

Thursday, December 29, 2016

Cataract Falls State Recreation

Cataract Falls State Recreation
Cataract Falls
Upper Cataract Falls 

A Visit to McCormick’s State Park
A Visit to McCormick’s State Park
A visit to Cataract Falls will reveal two waterfalls a half mile apart. The Falls are, by volumn, the largest waterfalls in Indiana. The Upper Falls is at the Cataract Falls State Recreation Area. This Falls drops about thirty feet. Visitors will find an observation deck to observe them located adjacent to a picnic area. a walk across Cataract Falls Covered Bridge, just above the Falls, affords a magnificient veiw if the Mill Creek Gorge below the Falls. The Lower Falls is accessed by hiking, or driving, the half mile distance to a parking area. Here, visitors are treated to the fifteen foot Lower Falls. A picnic area is located here, also. Mill Creek empties into Cagle Mill Lake, visible to the northwest of the Lower Falls from the parking area. Two pre-glacial period rock ridges located beneath an ancient lake create the geological conditions that allowed Cataract Falls to form.
Lower Cataract Falls
Lower Cataract Falls


Mill Creek
Mill Creek begins just east of Danville, Indiana, south of the Ernie Pyle Highway and a short distance west of County Road 450 W. As it flows generally southwest, it touches the eastern boundary of Amo before joining the East Branch of Mill Creek just north of Stilesville. The East Fork of Mill Creek's source is a little south of West Lincoln Street in Danville. The East Fork flows through largely rural countryside until its junction with Mill Creek. Mill Creek skirts Stilesville, then flows generally south, crossing Interstate 70 just west of Exit 51. From that point it flows generally southwest, crossing Indiana State Road 42. After crossing US Route 231 just south of North Cataract Road, Mill Creek enters Cataract Falls State Recreation Area. It empties into Cagle Mill Lake. Mill Creek reappears as it empties from the spillway, flowing a short distance to its junction with the Eel River.
Cataract Falls State Recreation
Cataract Falls State Recreation Area has covered picnic pavilions at the upper and lower falls, along with outhouse facilities. There is one nature trail, about one half mile long, that travels between the two falls. There are trails others have made on either side of Mill Creek. Use state road 225/250W to access the East side of the falls and Mill Creek. At the lower falls, you could hike down Mill Creek toward Cagle Mill Lake
Cataract Falls Covered Bridge
Cataract Falls Covered Bridge
Cataract Falls Covered Bridge

Constructed in 1876, by Smith Bridge Co. of Toledo, Ohio, Cataract Falls Covered Bridge conveyed travelers across Mill Creek until 1988. The 140 long bridge spans Mill Creek just above Cataract Falls. Replaced by a concrete bridge, the Smith type #4 through truss bridge is now open to foot traffic. The Indiana Department of Natural Resources began restoring the bridge, completing restoration in 2006 for $410,257. The National Register of Historic Places listed the bridge on April 27, 2005. The bridge is located in Cataract Falls State Recreation Area.
Mill Creek Gorge
Mill Creek Gorge

Cagle Mill Lake
Constructed in 1952, the 1400 acre lake serves as a flood control resevoir that protects Mill Creek and the Eel River from severe flooding. This was the first flood control lake built in Indiana. Cagle Mill Lake has picnic areas, a modern aquatic center, a volleyball court and a playground. Other activities include boating, fishing, hiking and pontoon boat rental.
Cataract Falls State Recreation Area
Below the bridge Cataract Falls begins its half mile, eighty-six foot descent to Cagle's Mill Lake. Cataract Falls is the largest waterfall in Indiana. There are two sets of falls, Upper Cataract and Lower Cataract. Both drop about twenty feet with a long system of rapids between them. Cataract Falls State Recreation Area has covered picnic pavilions at the upper and lower falls, along with outhouse facilities. There is one nature trail, about one half mile long, that travels between the two falls. There are trails others have made on either side of Mill Creek. Use state road 225/250W to access the East side of the falls and Mill Creek. At the lower falls, you could hike down Mill Creek toward Cagle Mill Lake
For more information, contact:
Cataract Falls State Recreation Area
N Cataract Rd, Indiana 47460
Phone:(866) 622-6746
http://cataractfalls.com

America's Dusty Files - December 29, 1753 - Washington Crosses Frozen Allegheny River on Raft

A Year of Colonial American Frontier History
A Year of Colonial American Frontier History
December 29, 1753 - Washington Crosses Frozen Allegheny River on Raft
George Washington’s most famous river crossing was during the Revolutionary War as he crossed the Delaware River as he maneuvered his troops in the hours before his victory at Trenton, New Jersey. His first river crossing in a hastily built raft took place almost twenty-three years before while on his first important diplomatic mission to the French prior to the French and Indian War.
Bitter Cold Weather
George Washington's party of seven had completed their journey to Fort Le Boeuf on the banks of Le Boeuf Creek in northwestern Pennsylvania. By December 13, the French commander had given a letter to Washington in reply to the Virginia governor's request that French forces leave the Ohio River Valley. He had denied the request. Washington was anxious to get the negative news back to the governor and had departed immediately. The weather turned cold, snowy and windy. Heavy snow and bitter cold impeded their progress. The horses, tired and overburdened with supplies, made slow progress in the snow. His exhausted men, frostbitten and weary, could scarcely walk. On December 25, Washington decided to go ahead with his bad news, leaving five men of the expedition to return with the horses and supplies as the weather allowed. He chose his guide, Christopher Gist, as his companion for the journey. The two traveled by night to avoid detection by the natives. They were detected once and a native fired on them, narrowly missing Washington.
Icy Crossing
The men arrived at the Allegheny River near the site of present day Pittsburg on December 28 after a forty-mile walk in the snow and cold. Washington could only have felt dismay when he saw the river. He had expected that the cold weather would have frozen it, allowing him and Gist to cross over the ice. However, it was not frozen. The swollen current carried huge chunks of ice with it as it swept by the nearly frozen men. Determined to cross, the men spent December 29 building a raft. The only tool the men had was a hatchet. With this, they cut logs and vines, fashioning their raft. By night, they had finished. In the darkness, they pushed the raft into the frigid water and started across the treacherous waters. By the time they reached midstream, the raft became jammed in ice flows. Washington wrote later in his journal:
"Before we were half way over, we were jammed in the ice in such a manner that we expected every minute to perish. I put out my setting pole to stop the raft, and the rapidity of the stream jerked me out into 10 feet of water, but I saved myself by catching hold of one of the raft logs. With all our efforts, we could not get to either shore, but I was obliged, as we were near an island, to quit our raft and make it."
The two men spent a wet, cold night on that island. By morning the river had frozen. Gist and Washington walked across the frozen surface.
Washington Crossing Bridge
The island Washington and Gist spent the night on has long since disappeared. It lay between current 38th and 40th Streets in Philadelphia. The Washington Crossing Bridge on 40th Street, built in 1924, is named in honor of the men's feat.

Indiana's history begins many decades before December 11, 1816 when Indiana became a state. The first foundations of Indiana's were laid with the voyages of Christopher Columbus and the settlement that came later. The American History A Day at A Time - 2015 series is in an easy to read "This Day in History," format and includes articles by the author from that series. The reader may read the articles as they appear, or purchase the book:
A Year of Colonial American Frontier History

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© Paul Wonning 2016

Hoosier Dusty Files - December 29, 1885 - Indiana Academy of Science Organized

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

December 29, 1885 - Indiana Academy of Science Organized
Archeologist and zoologist Amos W. Butler's efforts to form an organization to share scientific information and serve as a communications network with other state scientists began in 1884. His work culminated with the formation of the Indiana Academy of Science in 1885.
Amos W. Butler (March 11, 1810 - 1937)
The son of William Wallace Butler and Hannah (Wright) Butler, Amos was native to Brookville, Indiana in Franklin County. Butler attended local schools in Brookville and then attended Brookville College. After a year or so at Brookville College, Butler attended Hanover College and spent a year in Mexico in the official capacity of a member of the United States legation there. He actually spent a great deal of time doing scientific fieldwork, mostly zoology and archeology. Butler spent several years in the insurance industry before completing his college education. After completing his education, he commenced his lifelong work in archeology and zoology. He would found the Brookville Society of Natural History in 1881 and gave lectures at many universities around the state, including Indiana University, Purdue and others. He also became active in the prison reform and mental hygiene fields. He belonged to an impressive list of scientific and scholastic organizations. The Amos Butler Audubon Society in Indianapolis derives its name from him. He became frustrated by the lack of shared scientific knowledge.
Indiana Academy of Science
After communication with various scientists around Indiana, Butler used his Brookville Society of Natural History to mold a new organization, the Indiana Academy of Science. The town hall at Brookville served as the site where much of the initial organizational work occurred. The prospective members of this new society met on December 29, 1885 in the Marion County Courthouse, Indianapolis. The approximately forty attendees composed the new society's constitution and by-laws. The society would incorporate on December 21, 1887. The Society has contributed greatly to health care, disease control, food law development as well as many other accomplishments for Indiana citizens.
For more information about the Society, contact:
Indiana Academy of Science
650 W. Washington
Indianapolis, IN 46204
(317) 974-0827

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
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© Paul Wonning

Wednesday, December 28, 2016

America's Dusty Files - December 28, 1630 - Massachusetts Bay Colony Chooses New Site for Capital

A Year of Colonial American Frontier History
A Year of Colonial American Frontier History
December 28, 1630 - Massachusetts Bay Colony Chooses New Site for Capital
During the early colonial era, the Puritans of Massachusetts Bay Colony worried about attack by the native tribes. But they worried about attack by the pirates, French and Spanish even more. These fears resulted in a search for a new capital city to replace Boston, which they feared was too vulnerable to attack by sea.
Search for a New Capital
On September 30, 1630, John Winthrop and several other men rowed up the Charles River in search of a new site. Thus began their quest for, in the words of John Winthrop, "a fit place for a fortified town." Their requirements were few, but crucial. The site had to be accessible by sea, yet easily defensible from marauding ships. There had to be an adequate water supply. The found a likely site on the first high near the river's channel. After disembarking, legend states that the men crested a rounded hill where Winthrop speared the ground with his cane, saying. "This is the place." The site was ideal. It was inland. The river was navigable by oceangoing ships at high tide. The narrow river channel would make it difficult for war ships to attack without exposing themselves to the colony's cannon. In addition, the hill was perfect for the construction of a palisade.
Meetings and a Decision
The group returned to Boston to discuss their choice. Then they made a return trip. Finally, by December 28, 1630 they signed an agreement to build their new capital at the new site, which they would call simply, Newe Towne.
First Planned Town in the English Colonies
The men laid out the new town with care. First, they constructed a palisade, and then laid out three streets parallel to the river and four perpendicular to it. The grid would contain 64 house lots, a meetinghouse, a school, and a market square. There would be common land to the north to graze cattle and a future planned college. By spring, 1631 they began constructing the first houses. The planners used some of the first building codes to govern home construction in the new town. They wanted a compact, neat town and forbade owners from building homes too close to their garden plots. They required all roofs to be of slate or tile to protect against fire. There would be no new homes outside the palisade until all the building lots were taken.
New University and a Name Change
The General Court appropriated funds for a college in New Towne in 1636, which at the beginning was referred to as "New College." In honor of Cambridge University in England, the residents changed the name of the town to Cambridge in 1638. That same year John Harvard died of tuberculosis and bequeathed his 400-volume library and 779 pounds sterling to the new college. Thus, the College Board named the college "Harvard."

Indiana's history begins many decades before December 11, 1816 when Indiana became a state. The first foundations of Indiana's were laid with the voyages of Christopher Columbus and the settlement that came later. The American History A Day at A Time - 2015 series is in an easy to read "This Day in History," format and includes articles by the author from that series. The reader may read the articles as they appear, or purchase the book:
A Year of Colonial American Frontier History

Facebook
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© Paul Wonning 2016

Hoosier Dusty Files - December 28, 1804 - John Johnson Appointed Chief Justice of First Territorial Supreme Court

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

December 28, 1804 - John Johnson Appointed Chief Justice of First Territorial Supreme Court
John Johnson (? - September 17, 1817)
Historians know little of Johnson's early life. A native of Pennsylvania, Kentucky or Virginia, he moved to Vincennes in the Indiana Territory in 1804 and started a law practice. He helped the Indiana Territory achieve "second grade" status, which meant the territory was entitled to non-voting congressional representation in the United States House of Representatives. He gained election to the Territorial assembly and, together with a man named John Rice Jones, helped codify the laws of the territory. The Territorial Assembly adopted this code with some revisions and it became the foundation of Territorial law until Statehood was achieved in 1816. When Jonathan Jennings became president of the Constitutional Convention in Corydon in 1816, he appointed Johnson the task of drafting the judicial section. Jennings appointed Johnson as Chief Justice of the Indiana Supreme Court, his term beginning December 28, 1816. The other Justices were James Scott and Jesse Holman. The court went into session in May. Johnson died during the court's first recess, before any major decisions were made.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
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© Paul Wonning

Tuesday, December 27, 2016

America's Dusty Files - December 27, 1657 - Signing of the Flushing Remonstrance

A Year of Colonial American Frontier History
A Year of Colonial American Frontier History
December 27, 1657 - Signing of the Flushing Remonstrance
A bold petition by thirty men addressed to Dutch Director-General of New Amsterdam Peter Stuyvesant pleaded for religious tolerance from the autocratic leader. The Flushing Remonstrance was an early document that touted the idea of religious freedom, a novel idea in the colonies at the time. The men issued the remonstrance specifically in response to Stuyvesant's ban on Quakers, but it mentions other religions as well.
Stuyvesant's Ban on Quakers
The Quakers had garnered a reputation for social non-conformity. They interrupted the religious services of other faiths, proteolysed aggressively and espoused radical ideas. They found themselves unwelcome and persecuted in England and banned in Boston. Many colonies, hearing of their reputation, banned them before any even arrived. In 1657, a Quaker missionary named Robert Hodgson arrived in New Amsterdam and began preaching in public. However, New Amsterdam had a reputation as a religiously tolerant place. However, Hodgson pushed Stuyvesant too far, and the Director-General had him arrested. After Hodgson's arrest, Stuyvesant wrote a decree that fined anyone that sheltered a Quaker and encouraged the populace to report any Quaker activities in the colony.
Flushing
English settlers, using a charter issued by Dutch Governor Willem Kieft, occupied the area known originally as Vlissengen. Pronounced as "Vlishing," the name has been anglicized in modern times to "Flushing." The town's charter allowed some degree of religious tolerance, but the only religion that could meet publicly was the Dutch Reformed Church. All others had to meet in private homes. The charted also required that all representatives in the town be members of the Dutch Reformed Church. Stuyvesant was a strict Dutch Reformer. He had worked in the past to prevent Lutherans from constructing a church and tried to prevent the entry of Jews into the colony. The decree met with differing opinions in the English areas of New Amsterdam. England at the time was embroiled in religious controversy and this ferment had reached the New World. Some colonists opposed Stuyvesant's decree while others supported it. During 1657, the policy caused some arrests not only of Quakers but of Baptists, also. A growing disquiet engulfed the community.
The Flushing Remonstrance
Thirty English residents of Flushing gathered to sign the document that historians now call the Flushing Remonstrance. None of the signers were Quakers, but most sympathized with them. The petition pleaded for religious toleration. The closing lines of the document are:
"The law of love, peace and liberty in the states extending to Jews, Turks and Egyptians, as they are considered sonnes of Adam, which is the glory of the outward state of Holland, soe love, peace and liberty, extending to all in Christ Jesus, condemns hatred, war and bondage. And because our Saviour sayeth it is impossible but that offences will come, but woe unto him by whom they cometh, our desire is not to offend one of his little ones, in whatsoever form, name or title hee appears in, whether Presbyterian, Independent, Baptist or Quaker, but shall be glad to see anything of God in any of them, desiring to doe unto all men as we desire all men should doe unto us, which is the true law both of Church and State; for our Saviour sayeth this is the law and the prophets.
Therefore if any of these said persons come in love unto us, we cannot in conscience lay violent hands upon them, but give them free egresse and regresse unto our Town, and houses, as God shall persuade our consciences, for we are bounde by the law of God and man to doe good unto all men and evil to noe man. And this is according to the patent and charter of our Towne, given unto us in the name of the States General, which we are not willing to infringe, and violate, but shall houlde to our patent and shall remaine, your humble subjects, the inhabitants of Vlishing."
Stuyvesant's Response
Stuyvesant's response was harsh. He immediately closed the governing council of Vlishing down. He chose replacements for the men that had made up the council. These men he arrested and fined. All the signers ultimately recanted. The Director-General doubled down on his stance by levying a tax on the inhabitants whose revenue went to finance the salary of a Reformed minister. He also required that all the town's magistrates speak Dutch.
Precursor to the First Amendment?
Many consider the Flushing Remonstrance a Precursor to the First Amendment. Others disagree, stating that it had no impact on Stuyvesant's religious policies and it appears in no other sources the Framers used. So, while the controversy endures, the fact that the document was a remarkable call for religious toleration for its time endures also.

Indiana's history begins many decades before December 11, 1816 when Indiana became a state. The first foundations of Indiana's were laid with the voyages of Christopher Columbus and the settlement that came later. The American History A Day at A Time - 2015 series is in an easy to read "This Day in History," format and includes articles by the author from that series. The reader may read the articles as they appear, or purchase the book:
A Year of Colonial American Frontier History

Facebook
@indianatreker
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© Paul Wonning 2016

Hoosier Dusty Files - December 27, 1813 - General Orders Issued Indiana Militia

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

December 27, 1813 - General Orders Issued Indiana Militia
Acting Indiana Territory Governor John Gibson had grown concerned about activity by the Amerindian tribes in the Territory during 1813. In response, he urged the Indiana Territorial Assembly to pass an act in early December, 1813 to increase the militia. On December 27, 1813, new Indiana Territory Governor Thomas Posey issued general orders to the newly formed militia companies. General Washington Johnston would lead the new regiments.
John Gibson (May 23, 1740 – April 10, 1822)
Native to Lancaster, Pennsylvania John was the son of George and Elizabeth de Vinez Gibson. Historians know little of his childhood, only that he served in several political positions and worked as a merchant. He served in the Forbes Expedition that occupied Fort Duquesne in 1758 when the French abandoned it. He served admirably during the Revolutionary War, rising from regiment commander to the commander of Fort Pitt, the former Fort Duquesne that he had occupied during the French and Indian War. While at Fort Pitt, he lent aid to George Rogers Clark's thrust into the Wabash River area in what would become Indiana. After the war, he retired to private life until President Thomas Jefferson appointed him Secretary of the Indiana Territory. Gibson moved to Vincennes in July 1800 to act as acting governor until Governor William Henry Harrison arrived in January 1801. During this first tenure, Gibson organized the first census of the territory. This yearlong process revealed a population of around 5000 people in 1802. When Harrison arrived, Gibson occupied several territorial offices. His knowledge of several native languages made him an invaluable asset to Harrison during the many treaties concluded with the natives during that period. When Harrison departed on military campaigns during the War of 1812, Gibson again served as acting governor. His last official act was overseeing the move of the Territorial Capital from Vincennes to Corydon. Upon completion of his term, Gibson, at seventy-two years old, retired to Braddock's Field near Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, where he died.
Thomas Posey
William Henry Harrison resigned as governor of the Indiana Territory on December 28, 1812 to pursue a military career against the Amerindian tribes in the Northwest Territory. President James Madison appointed Thomas Posey governor on March 3, 1813, disappointing many members of the Indiana Territorial assembly who wanted the new governor to be a northerner that opposed slavery. Posey would not arrive in Vincennes until December 1813.
Native Unrest
The Battle of Tippecanoe in November 1811 had not ended the native threat. Tecumseh still lived and many of the tribes in the Indiana Territory still opposed American settlements in the area. The Pigeon Roost Massacre had occurred in 1812. During 1813, the natives did not attack any of the forts maintained in the Territory. Incidents did occur, however. Warriors would gather quietly near a fort and wait. When a man came out to tend his fields or perform some other duty, they would attack him, killing him most of the time. Incidents occurred near Vallonia, in Franklin County and near Vincennes. Several men died during these various attacks. A Colonel Russel had led an expedition of several hundred men out of Fort Vallonia, near Brownstown, Indiana, to attack villages on the Mississinewa River. He found only empty villages. Tecumseh had died during the Battle of the Thames on October 6, 1813. After his death, native activity slowed, but did not cease. Eastern areas near the Ohio border were fairly safe, but areas to the west, mainly near the Wabash, were not. The Assembly hoped that the increased militia presence would further secure the Territory. The main problem being that so many men were already serving in various militia and ranger units, most of the male population was already engaged.
General Washington Johnston (November 10th, 1776 - October 26, 1833)
Native to Culpepper, Virginia, Johnson migrated to Vincennes, probably along the Vincennes Trace from Louisville, in 1793. His parents named him for General Washington. Historians know little of his early years in Virginia. Johnson's lengthy career in Indiana included a number of firsts, the first postmaster of Vincennes in 1800, the first lawyer in Vincennes and organizer of the Knox County Bar Association. Voters elected him to the first Territorial Assembly in 1810 and as a member of Vincennes University board of trustees. He was one of the commissioners that formed Dubois County in 1818. Johnson had served as a private in Harrison's army that won the Battle of Tippecanoe. Johnson had served as an aide to Gibson, who recommended Johnson be promoted to major. He would command the new militia as adjutant general, issuing the first general orders on December 27, 1813.
The New Militia Units
The orders organized the new force into twelve regiments, six brigades, and three divisions. A treaty signed by the various tribes on July 22, 1814 at Greenville, Ohio reduced the native threat and the militia disbanded.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
@indianatreker
@MossyFeetBooks
Twitter
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© Paul Wonning

Monday, December 26, 2016

America's Dusty Files - December 26, 1492 First Spanish Settlement In New World Founded By Columbus

A Year of Colonial American Frontier History
A Year of Colonial American Frontier History
December 26, 1492 First Spanish Settlement In New World Founded By Columbus
The Santa Maria's grounding had presented Columbus with both a problem and an opportunity. In the absence of the Pinta, the extra crewmen would not fit on the Nina. On Christmas Day, Columbus made the decision to found a settlement on Hispaniola with the crewmen from the Santa Maria. By the next day, the crewmen began breaking up the ship to use the lumber to build the small settlement. Columbus and his crew would remain on Hispaniola, building the stockade using logs from the forest and lumber from the ship. He would leave thirty-nine men behind.

Indiana's history begins many decades before December 11, 1816 when Indiana became a state. The first foundations of Indiana's were laid with the voyages of Christopher Columbus and the settlement that came later. The American History A Day at A Time - 2015 series is in an easy to read "This Day in History," format and includes articles by the author from that series. The reader may read the articles as they appear, or purchase the book:
A Year of Colonial American Frontier History

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© Paul Wonning 2016

Hoosier Dusty Files - December 26, 1929 - Fulton Glass Company Organized - Hartford City

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

December 26, 1929 - Fulton Glass Company Organized - Hartford City
The gas boom that began with the discovery of natural gas in central Indiana fueled the economy with new job creation. Glass factories require massive amounts of energy. When the gas boom began in the late Eighteenth Century, manufacturers began moving into the state. Hartford City, Indiana became a major beneficiary of this movement. Seventeen glass factories operated in or around Hartford city. The population had stood at 2,287 in 1890. It more than doubled to 5,912 by 1900. Hartford City began to think of itself as the "Glass Capital of the world. By the early Twentieth Century, the pockets of gas began to run out and by 1909, the gas boom was over. Many of the glass plants of Hartford City began to close. Many of the plants remained open and several more did open. The manager of the Johnson Glass Company, George T. Fulton, founded the Fulton Glass Company on December 26, 1929. The company would operate until fire destroyed the factory in 1966. A sister facility in Vincennes would operate until 1986; however the corporate headquarters remained in Hartford City.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
@indianatreker
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Twitter
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© Paul Wonning

Sunday, December 25, 2016

America's Dusty Files - December 25, 1492 - The Santa Maria Runs Aground

A Year of Colonial American Frontier History
A Year of Colonial American Frontier History
December 25, 1492 - The Santa Maria Runs Aground
Sometime during the early morning hours of December 25, the Santa Maria ran aground off the coast of Hispaniola.
Grounding of the Santa Maria
Columbus and his crew had spent a great deal of time exploring the island of Hispaniola. They had found some gold and made contact with the local Taino tribes that inhabited the island. As they lay off the shore of the island during the night of December 25, the Santa Maria ran aground on some off shore sand bars.
Rescue and Decisions
Columbus and the crew of the Nina managed to rescue the crew of the Santa Maria without losing a person. The ship, however, was firmly grounded and he could not save it. The extra men from the ship would not fit on the Nina. Since Martín Alonso Pinzón had absconded with the Pinta, Columbus had a decision to make. He decided to found a colony on Hispaniola and leave some of his crew to inhabit it. He consulted with the Taino cacique (chieftain) Guacanagari, who allowed Columbus to build a stockade.

Indiana's history begins many decades before December 11, 1816 when Indiana became a state. The first foundations of Indiana's were laid with the voyages of Christopher Columbus and the settlement that came later. The American History A Day at A Time - 2015 series is in an easy to read "This Day in History," format and includes articles by the author from that series. The reader may read the articles as they appear, or purchase the book:
A Year of Colonial American Frontier History

Facebook
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© Paul Wonning 2016

Hoosier Dusty Files - December 25, 1799 - Christmas (Noel) Dagenet Born

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

December 25, 1799 - Christmas (Noel) Dagenet Born
Visitors to Lafayette, Indiana will find the following historical marker placed to honor Christmas Dagnet.
Title of Marker:
Christmas (Noel) Dagenet
Location:
West side of Lafayette Road/CR 600 W, 0.25 mile north of Armiesburg. (Parke County, Indiana)
Installed by:
Installed: 2004 Indiana Historical Bureau and The Dagenett Family
Marker ID #:
61.2004.1
Marker Text:
Side one:
Born December 25, 1799 near Terre Haute; baptised by Father Rivet, missionary at Vincennes. Son of French fur trader Ambrose Dagenet and Mechinquamesha, sister of Wea chief Jacco. Served Wea nation and U.S. government at Treaty of St. Mary's signed 1818. Married to Mary Ann Isaacs 1819 by Isaac McCoy at his Baptist Indian mission near here.
Side two:
Recommended by William Clark to work for U.S. government as Interpreter, receiving $400 per year, June 1824 through 1827. He selected land here to fulfill grant in Treaty of St. Mary's; land recorded 1824. Family moved west 1847. Dagenet employed in the last removal of Miamis from Indiana beginning 1846. He died before April 10 in 1848.
Brief History
The Indiana Historical Bureau has more extensive information about Christmas (Noel) Dagenet at this link:
A Summary
The IHB uses the spelling of Dagenet's name that appears on his will dated January 24 1848. ]; H. W. Beckwith, author of the History of Vigo and Parke Counties indicates he met with Dagenet's widow, Mary Ann Dagenet Baptiste at Paola, Kansas in 1878 for details regarding his life. This information does not always agree with primary source documents.
The son of French fur trader Ambrose Dagenet and his wife Jacco, the sister of the Wea Tribe's chief, Dagenet served as interpreter at the negotiations during the Treaty of Miami signed in 1818. He married Mary Ann Isaacs on February 16, 1819.  Isaac McCoy married the couple at his Baptist Mission near Armiesburg in Parke County.
William Clark, famous for the William and Clark Expedition that began near the Falls of the Ohio, recommended Dagenet to serve as an interpreter. He served as such from 1824 through 1827 for $400 per year.
He chose his land from the area that the Wea did not cede, as per the 1818 Treaty of Miami.
Treaty of St. Mary's
The lands acquired from the Miami tribe by the terms of the Treaty with the Miami, 1818 (Treaty of St. Mary's), are referred to as the "New Purchase." Jonathan Jennings, Lewis Cass, and Benjamin Parke acting as representatives of the United States signed a treaty with the Miami nation on October 6, 1818. As per terms of the treaty, the Miami has ceded a vast area in central Indiana to the United States. The treaty excepted except a seven-mile square reserve located at the mouth of Raccoon Creek. The United States agreed to pay the Miami tribe fifteen thousand dollars a year, erect a gristmill and one sawmill. They would also provide a blacksmith and pay one hundred sixty bushels of salt a year to the tribe. Dagenet moved with the last 350 members of the Mississinewa in 1846, as per the terms of the Indian Removal Act of 1830. They voyaged to Westport, in the Missouri Territory, by steamboat. Dagenet died sometime before April 1848.

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
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Twitter
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© Paul Wonning

Saturday, December 24, 2016

America's Dusty Files - December 24, 1745 - Benjamin Rush Born

A Year of Colonial American Frontier History
A Year of Colonial American Frontier History
December 24, 1745 - Benjamin Rush Born
During his lifetime, Benjamin Rush served as a leading doctor, politician, Signer of the Declaration of Independence and the surgeon-general of the middle department of the Continental Army during the American Revolution.
Birth and Early Education
Born near Philadelphia to John Harvey Rush and Susanna Hall Rush, Benjamin was the fourth of seven children born to the couple. After his father's death, his mother sent him and his brother Jacob to live with an aunt and uncle in 1753, who would see to the boy's education. He and his brother attended the Reverend Samuel Finley's school in Cecil County, Maryland. From there he attended College of New Jersey, receiving a Bachelor of Arts Degree in 1761. Upon graduation, Benjamin apprenticed to Philadelphia Dr. John Redman until 1766. Redman encouraged him to continue his studies in Scotland at the leading medical university at the time, the University of Edinburgh. He earned an M. D. Degree from the University in 1768.
Doctor, Professor and Patriot
He returned to Philadelphia and opened a medical practice. He also received an appointment as Professor of Chemistry at the College of Philadelphia. During this time, he wrote the first American textbook on chemistry as well as several medical books. The rising conflict between England and her colonies heightened during the 1760's and Rush became active in the Sons of Liberty. He advised Thomas Paine in his efforts to publish his influential booklet, Common Sense. The citizens of Philadelphia elected him a delegate to the Continental Congress that met in Philadelphia during the summer of 1776. He became one of the signers of that document.
War
During the early stages of the Revolutionary War, Rush served in the Continental Army, seeing action at Trenton and Princeton. He received appointment as surgeon-general of the middle department of the Continental Army during the American Revolution. During this time, he became involved in a dispute with General George Washington, after which he resigned and distanced himself from the war effort. He became a lecturer at the University of the State of Pennsylvania and part of Pennsylvania Hospital's staff. After the war, he helped found Philadelphia College of Physicians in 1787. Active as President Madison's United States Mint treasurer, he advised and trained Meriwether Lewis in frontier afflictions and cures as he prepared for the Corps of Discovery's explorations of the Louisiana Purchase. He gave Lewis fifty dozen of his Dr. Rush's Bilious Pills, a laxative to help them during their meat based diet during the expedition. The men of the expedition called them "thunderclappers." The high mercury content of the pills has helped historians track the expedition's route.
Death and Burial
On April 19, 1813 Rush died of typhus fever. He was interred at Christ Church in Philadelphia.

Indiana's history begins many decades before December 11, 1816 when Indiana became a state. The first foundations of Indiana's were laid with the voyages of Christopher Columbus and the settlement that came later. The American History A Day at A Time - 2015 series is in an easy to read "This Day in History," format and includes articles by the author from that series. The reader may read the articles as they appear, or purchase the book:
A Year of Colonial American Frontier History

Facebook
@indianatreker
@MossyFeetBooks Twitter
@MossyFeetBooks
© Paul Wonning 2016

Hoosier Dusty Files - December 24, 1824 - William Digby Purchased Land for Lafayette

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

December 24, 1824 - William Digby Purchased Land for Lafayette
Lafayette
County - Tippecanoe
Platted - 1825
Incorporated - 1853
Founded by - William Digby
Named for - General Lafayette
Area - 27.74 sq mi
Elevation - 692 ft
Population (2010) - 67,140
ZIP code - 47901, 47904, 47905, 47909
Area code - 765
Major Highways
Interstate I-65
US Route 52
US Route 31
Indiana State Road 25
Indiana State Road 26
Indiana State Road 38
Lafayette derives its name from the French Revolutionary War here, Marquis de Lafayette
Gilbert du Motier, Marquis de la Fayette (September 6, 1757 - May 20, 1834)
The son of Michel du Motier, Marquis de La Fayette and Marie Louise Jolie de La Rivière, Motier was a native of Le Puy-en-Velay, France. The Motier's possessed land, wealth and influence. Commissioned an officer in the French army at age thirteen, Motieer gained his father's title when his father died in 1757. His mother died in 1770, bequeathing him his wealth at age thirteen. La Fayette married the twelve-year-old Marie Adrienne Françoise in 1773 when La Fayette was fifteen. The couple traveled to Versailles to live. The couple would be devoted spouses until her death in 1807. While in Versailles, La Fayette learned of the American colonies struggle against the British and resolved to travel to the colonies. He arrived, at age nineteen, near Georgetown, South Carolina, on June 13, 1777. La Fayette would go on to become a hero of the American Revolution and a devoted friend of George Washington. Many places in the United States bear the name of the beloved La Fayette.
French occupation of the area began in 1717 when they constructed Fort Ouiatenon on the north side of the Wabash River about three miles south of present day Lafayette. The fort developed into a hub of fur traders, Amerindians and merchants. The fort was the first fortified settlement in Indiana. The Wea tribe had a village on the other side of the river. During the French and Indian War, British forces captured the fort in 1761 from the French and used it as a base of operations of Amerindian attacks against the Americans during the Revolutionary War. An American force captured it in 1778. President George Washington had the fort destroyed in 1791. A trader named William purchased the land for the town on December 24, 1824. He named the new town Lafayette after the famous French American Revolutionary War hero.
William Digby, Jr. (1802 - May 23, 1864)
The son of William Digby and  Catharine Bailey Digby, William was native to Kentucky. He spent some years in Ohio while still a young child, then agreed to become a “bound boy” for a man named John Sample at Winchester, Indiana. A “bound boy was essentially an indentured servant that agreed to work for another person for a specified length of time in exchange for food, clothing and shelter. Digby had little in the way of a formal education. When his term of service expired, Digby moved to Illinois to live the life of a river trader along the Wabash River. In this way, he learned the intracacities of the river. When he learned that the government would open land sales in the area he traveled to the land office in Crawfordsville, purchasing the land of December 24, 1824. Digby would later plat the nearby town of Americus when he learned that the Wabash and Erie Canal would terminate there. Instead, the canal extended into Lafayette, bypassing his settlement. Digby would spend his life working on the river, passing away in Lafayette. He is interred in Greenbush Cemetery.
It became the county seat for Tippecanoe County. The Wabash and Erie Canal connected the town to the Great Lakes from the 1840's until operations ceased in 1874. The development of the railroad made canals obsolete. By the 1850's railroads reached Lafayette. Purdue University was established on May 6, 1869. The Purdue Agricultural Works Building was abandoned by the University and purchased by the Lafayette Car Works for its new factory in 1880.
Portions of these articles excerpted from the author's books:
A Day in Indiana History - January
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - East Central Edition
Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
@indianatreker
@MossyFeetBooks
Twitter
@MossyFeetBooks
© Paul Wonning

Friday, December 23, 2016

America's Dusty Files - December 23, 1750 - Ben Franklin Attempts to Electrocute a Turkey

A Year of Colonial American Frontier History
A Year of Colonial American Frontier History
December 23, 1750 - Ben Franklin Attempts to Electrocute a Turkey
Ben Franklin spent many hours studying the force known as electricity, an energy source scientists knew little about in the Eighteenth Century. His December 23, 1750 attempt to electrocute a turkey left the turkey safe and sound. Franklin, however, was quite shocked by the experience.
Retirement, Science and Philanthropy
By 1750, Franklin had retired from the printing business and spent his time doing various scientific, educational and philanthropic activities. The greater part of his time, he spent studying the force that Archibald Spencer had introduced him to seven years before. Franklin had acquired an assortment of Leyden jars, glass rods, silken threads and other equipment he used to study this mysterious force. His efforts had led to a device he called an electrical jack, a rotisserie device he used to turn chickens and turkeys over a fire. He had gathered an assortment of friends to watch as he used electricity to kill the bird, then roast it over a fire he had kindled using a bottle he had electrified. He would roast the turkey over the fire using the electrical jack he had invented. Sometime before December, he had already successfully electrocuted some turkeys and chickens, so he knew the process worked, killing the birds quickly and, he felt, made the meat more tender by the process.
The Turkey Escapes
Franklin had readied his equipment, storing static electricity in over forty Leyden jars. The crowd had gathered to watch and eat turkey. As Franklin prepared to shock the bird, somehow he touched the electrical leads himself. The watching crowd heard a loud "crack" as an orange cloud of fire engulfed Franklin. The shock left Franklin dazed and sore. He later wrote his brother John, relating the experience, “I have lately made an experiment in electricity that I desire never to repeat. Two nights ago, being about to kill a turkey by the shock from two large glass jars…I inadvertently took the whole through my own arms and body…Do not make [this] more public, for I am ashamed to have been guilty of so notorious a blunder."
Relenting
He relented, wishing to charge other scientists studying this force to take care during their experiments. He wrote about the experience in his book, “Experiments and Observations on Electricity.” This book had helped lead him to winning the coveted Godfrey Copley Medal in 1753.

Indiana's history begins many decades before December 11, 1816 when Indiana became a state. The first foundations of Indiana's were laid with the voyages of Christopher Columbus and the settlement that came later. The American History A Day at A Time - 2015 series is in an easy to read "This Day in History," format and includes articles by the author from that series. The reader may read the articles as they appear, or purchase the book:
A Year of Colonial American Frontier History

Facebook
@indianatreker
@MossyFeetBooks Twitter
@MossyFeetBooks
© Paul Wonning 2016

Hoosier Dusty Files - December 23, 1837 - Company Orgaized to Mine Coal – Cannalton, Perry County Cannelton

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016

December 23, 1837 - Company Orgaized to Mine Coal – Cannalton, Perry County
Cannelton
Cannelton began as a company town for workers employed by the American Cannel Coal Company in 1837. The founders of the company built cabins that housed almost a dozen families. The American Cannel Coal Company handled real estate transactions, quarried stone and mined coal. Half of the town burned in 1839 and in 1841, the stockholders of the mine left. A new group of men bought the mine, including the only one that lived in Cannelton, Francis Yates Carlile. Carlile surveyed the town in 1841 and conducted a poll among the residents for a new name. The residents chose the name Cannelton, a name that reflected the type of coal found in the area.  Most of the residents used this name, anyway, so Cannleton it became in 1844.
Boating enthusiasts can access the Cannelton Locks and Dam "lake" in the town. The 114-mile "lake" within the channel of the Ohio River stretches all the way to Louisville. Visitors can also enjoy the Cannelton Heritage Festival in October each year.
Cannelton is located on Indiana State Road 66 about twenty-two miles east of its intersection with US 231.
To learn more about the shopping, dining and lodging options of Cannelton, visit:
Cannelton Foundation
PO BOX 124
Cannelton, Indiana 47520
Cannelton Locks & Dam
Attractions
Bob Cummings - Lincoln Trail Bridge
Completed on December 21, 1966, the Lincoln Trail Bridge uses Indiana State Road 237 to span the Ohio River at Cannelton. The bridge connects to US 60 on the Kentucky side.
Lafayette Spring
Perry County Olde Courthouse Museum
Air Crash Memorial Site

Indiana possesses a rich history that is fun to read and learn. This Hoosier Dusty Files is in an easy to read “this day in history format” and includes articles from the author's A Year in Indiana History series. Visitors may read the articles as they appear or purchase the book:
A Year of Indiana History - 2016
Facebook
@indianatreker
@MossyFeetBooks
Twitter
@MossyFeetBooks
© Paul Wonning

Thursday, December 22, 2016

Indy Canal Walk

Indy Canal Walk
Indy Canal Walk
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
Central Edition
Indy Canal Walk
The Indy Canal Walk begins near the Indiana State Museum and travels along the old Indianapolis Central Canal past three museums, White River State Park and past upscale apartment and condominium buildings that face the canal. Hikers and bikers can visit the Medal of Honor Memorial, ride a paddleboat or gondola or just enjoy the magnificent view of Downtown Indianapolis from the walkway. The loop, which travels along both sides of the canal, is about three miles long. Major attractions along the canal include:
Indiana State Museum
Eiteljorg Museum
Indiana History Center
White River State Park
Medal of Honor Memorial

The Central Canal
Authorized by the Mammoth Internal Improvements Act, the canal's purpose was to connect Indianapolis with the Wabash and Erie Canal, thus providing a water access point to the Ohio River at Evansville. Workers only completed about eight miles of the canal before financial difficulties forced construction to come to a halt.
Indiana State Museum
Indiana State Museum

Indiana State Museum
The Indiana State Museum complex includes 40,000 square feet and well over 450,000 artifacts. The Museum also houses the Indiana Store, the IMAX Theatre and numerous special exhibitions throughout the year.
Indiana State Museum and Historic Sites
650 W. Washington St.
Indianapolis, IN 46204
317-232.-1637


Eiteljorg Museum
Eiteljorg Museum

Eiteljorg Museum
This exciting museum displays the art, culture and history of the American west. The staff displays Western culture and that of the indigenous peoples in unique and fascinating ways. Many have ranked its collection of Native American art as among the world's best. The museum staff collects Native American art and cultural object as well as artifacts from the old west. It is located on the Central Canal in White River State Park, White River State Park, downtown Indianapolis.
Eiteljorg Museum of American Indians & Western Art
500 W Washington St
Indianapolis, IN 46204
317-636-9378

Eugene and Marilyn Glick Indiana History Center
Eugene and Marilyn Glick Indiana History Center


Eugene and Marilyn Glick Indiana History Center
The Indiana Historical Society maintains changing exhibits throughout the year. These temporary exhibitions reflect the rich culture of the Hoosier State by showing photos, music, and other materials of Indiana history. In addition to the current exhibits, you may visit the William Henry Smith Memorial Library, the Basile History Market Gift Shop, Eli Lily Hall and the Cole Porter room. No admission is charged to visit the Indiana History Center.
Eugene and Marilyn Glick Indiana History Center
450 W. Ohio St.
Indianapolis, IN 46202


White River State Park 
White River State Park is located in downtown Indianapolis, Indiana and is adjacent to the Indianapolis Zoo. It is the state's only urban State Park, and one of the very few in the United States. From one facility, you can visit the Zoo, Botanical Gardens and Conservatory, and baseball game. It is within walking distance of the Indiana State Museum and IMAX Theatre.
Indianapolis Zoo 
1200 W. Washington St.
Indianapolis, IN 46222
317-630-2001
info@indyzoo.com

The Central Canal
The Central Canal

Other Activities
During the summer months visitors to the canal may take a gondola ride, pilot a paddle boat, dine at one of the numerous or restaurants located on or near the canal. Located near the Indy Canal Walk, guest may also visit:
Medal of Honor Memorial
NCAA Museum
USS Indianapolis Memorial
For more information, contact:
Canal Walk
801 W. Washington St.
Indianapolis, IN 46204
317-233-2434