Friday, November 25, 2016

A Year of Indiana History – 2016

A Year of Indiana History - 2016
A Year of Indiana History - 2016


A Year of Indiana History – 2016 includes three hundred and sixty-five days of Indiana history. Hoosier history buffs will enjoy these Indiana history stories, some of which are little known, others important benchmarks in Indiana history. The book includes:

January 26, 1826 - "Boatload of Knowledge" Arrives in New Harmony

February 8, 1901 - Indiana University Plays Its First Basketball Game

March 20, 1954 - Milan Miracle - Wins State Basketball Championship

April 16, 1867 - Wilbur Wright Born – Millsville

May 18, 1834 - Stagecoach Schedule From Louisville to Vincennes

June 19, 1978- Garfield Debuted

July 24, 1861 - Formation of the Indiana Jackass Regiment

August 21, 1805 - Treaty of Grouseland Signed

September 14, 1822 - Gray Squirrel Migrations Destroy Crops

October 01, 1843 - Indiana School for the Deaf Opened

November 21, 1812 - Battle of Wild Cat Creek

December 11, 1816 - Indiana Becomes a State

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© Mossy Feet Books 2016

Tuesday, November 22, 2016

Interstate 265

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
 South East Edition

Interstate 265 
Interstate 265 Interstate 265 is a short loop bypass which skirts New Albany Indiana in Clark County. On its journey it crosses Floyd and Clark County.
Interstate 265 in Clark County
Length - About 8.4 miles.
Interstate 265 begins at an intersection with Interstate 64 at Mile Marker 121 in New Albany, Floyd County and enters Clark County about six miles from its inception. It runs east from the county line about 2.4 miles to an intersection with Interstate 65 in Clarksville and ends there. Indiana State Road 62 and 265 intersect it at this point. Temporary Indiana State Road 265, which Interstate 265 will replace when complete, runs to East 10th Street in Jeffersonville where Indiana State Road 62 diverges to the north.
Interstate 265 in Floyd County
Length - About 6 miles
Interstate 265 begins at an intersection with Interstate 64 at Mile Marker 121 in Floyd County. It intersects two state highways, Indiana State Road 111 at MM 3 and Indiana State Road 311 at MM 4. Interstate 265 crosses the county line into Clark County about 1.7 miles east of this point.

Saturday, November 19, 2016

Day in Indiana History – December


Learn about Indiana history a day at a time. Ideal for history lovers, Day in Indiana History – December teaches the historical facts about Indiana in an easy to understand format. This volume includes the following articles:

December 03, 1806 - Vincennes Library Company Established

December 11, 1816 - Indiana Becomes a State

December 15, 1863 - 22nd Indiana Light Battery Mustered

December 19, 1868 - First Bridge Across Wabash at Vincennes Opens

December 24, 1824 - William Digby Purchased Land for Lafayette

The Indiana Bicentennial History Series will present the history of Indiana in a series of short articles that describe important facts and events in the history of the State of Indiana on a day-to-day format. The series presents those that wish to home school students about the history of the State of Indiana an ideal history book to do just that.

 
   
Available On:
Kindle
Amazon Softbound
Smashwords
Smashwords - 20% Free Sample
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble - Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Apple
Create Space - Softcover Book
Paul Wonning's Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Smashwords Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Apple
Paul Wonning's Books on Kobo
Paul Wonning's Books on Barnes and Noble

© Mossy Feet Books 2016

Friday, November 18, 2016

Indiana State Road 160


Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
 South East Edition
Indiana State Road 160
Length - About 25.6 Miles
Indiana State Road 160 begins in the west at an intersection with Indiana State Road 135 in Salem, Indiana. On its way west to its termination point at Charlestown, Indiana it crosses Washington and Clark  Counties.

Indiana State Road 160 in Clark County
Length - About four miles
Indiana State Road 160 enters Clark County about 14 miles east of its intersection with Indiana State Road 135 in Salem, Indiana. About 4.2 miles east it intersects Interstate 65 at Exit 19. About .5 miles east Indiana State Road 160 intersects US Route 31 in the town of Henryville. Indiana State Road 160 continues west, departing Clark County about two miles from US 31 and entering Washington County.


© Indiana Places 2016

Friday, November 11, 2016

Borden Institute Site - Indiana Historical Marker

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
 South East Edition
Title of Marker:
Borden Institute Site
Location:
301 West Street at school drive, Borden or New Providence. (Clark County, Indiana)
Installed by:
1995 Indiana Historical Bureau and West Clark Community Schools Gifted/Talented Program
Marker ID #: 10.1995.1
Marker Text:
Coeducational school founded 1884 by William W. Borden primarily to serve children of southern Indiana farmers. Low-cost, progressive program included teacher preparation and laboratory-based scientific studies. School closed 1906. Borden also established library and museum with extensive geological collections.
Brief History by the Author
William Borden was the son of John Borden, who founded the town he named New Providence in 1816. He named the town after his native town, Providence, Rhode Island. William gained wealth from his association with the silver mines in Lead City, Colorado. He became a scholar and philanthropist. He founded the Borden Institute in 1884 to use as a teacher college. He also pursued scientific studies in a laboratory environment. The Borden Institute closed in 1906. The community used it as their high school until 1955. The neglected building fell into disrepair and had to be torn down in 1983.
Borden also established a museum, library and built a magnificent mansion overlooking the town. The town changed its name to Borden to honor him. The museum still exists, as does the mansion. The mansion is a private residence but the museum is a community center. 

Thursday, November 10, 2016

Huber Orchard and Winery

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
 South East Edition
Huber Orchard and Winery
19816 Huber Rd
Borden, IN 47106

The 600 acre vineyard produces eighteen different kinds of grapes. Huber makes several types of wines, many of which have won awards. They also produce several distilled brandies on their farm as well as locally produced fruits and vegetables. Visitors may tour the distillery, winery and farm.

Wednesday, November 9, 2016

A Day in Indiana History - November

A Day in Indiana History - November

Learn about Indiana history a day at a time. Ideal for history lovers, Day in Indiana History – November teaches the historical facts about Indiana in an easy to understand format. This volume includes the following articles:

November 02, 1778 - Frances Slocum Abducted by Indians

November 07, 1811 - Battle of Tippecanoe

November 12, 1880 - Lew Wallace Publishes Ben Hur

November 19, 1752 - George Rogers Clark Born

November 28, 1799 - John Rice Jones Appointed to Carry Mail

The Indiana Bicentennial History Series will present the history of Indiana in a series of short articles that describe important facts and events in the history of the State of Indiana on a day-to-day format. The series presents those that wish to home school students about the history of the State of Indiana an ideal history book to do just that.

Available On:
Kindle
Kindle Softbound
Smashwords
Smashwords - 20% Free Sample
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble - Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Apple
Create Space - Softcover Book
Paul Wonning's Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Smashwords Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Apple
Paul Wonning's Books on Kobo
Paul Wonning's Books on Barnes and Noble

© Mossy Feet Books 2016

Borden Community Park

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
 South East Edition
Borden Community Park
Borden Community Park, at the corner of Main Street and Haywood Road on the northwest edge of Borden has baseball and softball fields, soccer fields, a running track and a walking trail. The trail follows Muddy Fork Creek as it meanders through the countryside. Visitors will also find restroom facilities, a picnic area in the park. 

Monday, November 7, 2016

Indiana Historical Marker - General Jefferson C. Davis - Memphis, Indiana


Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
 South East Edition
Indiana Historical Marker - General Jefferson C. Davis - Memphis, Indiana

Title of Marker:
General Jefferson C. Davis 1828-1879
Location: Location: US 31 and Court Street, Memphis. (Clark County, Indiana)
Installed by:
Erected by the Indiana Civil War Centennial Commission, 1963
Marker ID #:
10.1963.1
Marker Text:
was born in Clark Co., Ind. Appointed colonel of the 22nd Indiana Infantry. After promotion to brigadier general for service at Pea Ridge, he saw action at Corinth, Murfreesboro, and Chickamauga and the Atlantic Campaign.
History trivia buffs remember General Davis for two reasons. His name was similar to President Jefferson Davis of the Confederacy. And he murdered another Union general in full view of witnesses and got away with it.
General Jefferson C. Davis (1828-1879)
The eldest of eight children, Jefferson C. Davis was born near Memphis, Indiana. His parents, like many people in the area, had emigrated from Kentucky and took up residence in southern Indiana. He joined the 3rd Indiana Volunteers inJune 1846 to serve in the Mexican-American War. He proved brave during that war, eventually recieving a commission as a second lieutenant. When the rebels bombarded Fort Sumpter, starting the Civil War, Davis was serving in the fort as a garrison officer. The Army promoted him to captain in May, 1861 and sent him to Indiana to raise a regiment. With his following promotion to colonel, he recieved command of the 22nd Indiana Infantry. During action in Missouri he recieved promotion to Brigadier General.
Exhaustion
By summer 1862 Davis was exhausted by his combat duties. he requested, and recieved, a twenty day leave of absence to rest. He returned to Indiana. During his leave, the Confederacy won a major victory at the Battle of Richmond in Virginia. The Confederate army pressed the Union forces back and the Union Army fell back in Kentucky fell back to Louisville. The rebels were set for a major offensive, possibly into the north.
Insult and Dismissal
Davis heard of the situation and returned back to duty early. He reported to General Wright in Cincinatti. He sent him to aid General William "Bull" Nelson set up the Louisville defenses. General Nelson charged him with arming and training Louisville residents for defensive actions. After two days, Nelson ordered Davis to report. After giving some non-commital answers, Nelson insultingly dismissed him and ordered him to return across the Ohio River. He charged the guards with removing him if he did not go.
After protesting his poor treatment by Nelson, Davis departed to Cincinatti. From there, General White ordered him to return to Louisville. In the meantime General Buell had replaced Nelson at Louisville, so White assumed it was safe to send Davis back. Davis returned to Louisville.
The Murder
Nelson had been transferred, but had no yet left Louisville. He was in the hotel in which Davis was attending a meeting. Davis approached Nelson and demanded an apology. Nelson responded with another insult. Davis picked a registration card off the desk, wadded it up and flicked it into Nelson's face. Nelson bore the nickname "Bull." He was a huge man, possibly 300 pounds. Davis was a slight man, barely 125 pounds. An old friend of Davis, Indiana Oliver P. Morton had been in attendance at the meeting and witnessed the exchange. Davis asked the governor if he had come to see him insulted. When the governor answered in the negative, Davis left the room. Once outside, Davis asked an old friend for a pistol. The friend replied that he had none. Davis asked another and recieved one. He went back into the reception room and down a hall to Nelson's office. nelson was standing outside. Davis took aim and fired, hitting the man in the chest.
Off Scot Free
Davis was taken into custody. In a few days an old friend, Major General Horatio G. Wright, got him released and returned to duty. Because of the shortage of officers, Davis was never charged with murder. He served the rest of the war with distinction, retiring from the military many years after the war.

Excerpted from the author's book
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition

Memphis, Indiana

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
 South East Edition
Memphis
2.5 sq mi
Elevation - 486 ft
Population (2010) - 695
ZIP code - 47143
Area code(s) - 812
Located at the intersection of US Route 31, Blue Lick Road and Memphis/Charlestown Road, I-65 crosses through Memphis, with an entrance ramp at Exit 16.
Settlers from the Memphis, Tennessee area migrated into the area, naming the village after their home town. The post office opened in 1854. The 2012 tornado that damaged Henryville also damaged homes in Memphis.

Thursday, November 3, 2016

Utica, Indiana

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
 South East Edition
Utica
County - Clark
Area - 1.45 sq mi
Elevation - 443 ft
Population (2010) - 776
ZIP code - 47130
Area code(s) - 812
Located at the junction of Utica Pike and Old Salem Road, Utica hugs the north bank of the Ohio River. One of the oldest towns in Indiana, the town served as an important ferry link between Indiana and Kentucky.
History
James Noble Wood settled in Utica and platted the town in 1795. The original town had 220 lots. Wood operated a ferry in Utica, connecting the town with Kentucky across the Ohio River. The site, a few miles above the Falls of the Ohio, proved ideal, as the river was less dangerous here. The town grew, centered around the ferry. Stagecoaches, wagons and other travelers used the ferry to travel across the river.
James Noble Wood (December 26, 1768 - March 25, 1826)
Wood and his wife, Margaret Smith Woods, settled in the area north of the Ohio River around 1795. Wood established the town of Utica and a ferry business, the first in the area. He also became one of the first Territorial judges. Wood and his wife are interred at Hillcrest Cemetery in Utica.

Wednesday, November 2, 2016

Sellersburg, Indiana

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
 South East Edition
Sellersburg, Indiana
County - Clark
Township Silver Creek
Area - 3.97 sq mi (10.28 km2)
Elevation - 486 ft
Population (2010) - 6,128
ZIP code - 47172
Area code(s) - 812 and 930
Located on US Route 31 and Interstate 64 just north of its intersection of Interstate 265, Sellersburg has access to I-64 at Exits 7 and 9 and I-265 at Exit 4 via Charlestown Road.
History
Laid out by Moses Sellers as Sellersburgh in 1846, however the name became Sellersburg over time. One of the many "railroad towns" that sprang up along rail lines in the middle of the Nineteenth Century, Sellersburg was platted on the route of the Jeffersonville, Madison & Indianapolis Railroad, which passed on the east side of the town. In addition to platting the town, Sellers also ran the first general store in the village. The building still exists on the north side of New Albany Street.
Moses Wilkerson Sellers (August 22, 1796 - Died June 1, 1868)
The son of Robert Sellers and Sarah Sellers, Moses was native to Burke, North Carolina. The family moved to Kentucky around 1800, and then migrated into the Indiana Territory around 1810. Sellers acquired the land that became Sellersburg, which he platted in 1846. He and Margaret Littell married and would have four children. Moses kept the first store in town and served as the first postmaster when the post office was established in 1854.
Moses and his wife are interred in the Sellersburg cemetery.
Highways
I-64
I-265
US 31
Indiana State Road 60
Wilkerson Park and Mosley Park in Sellersburg, Speed Park and Silver Creek Township Park
For more information about dining, lodging and shopping in Sellersburg, contact:
Town of Sellersburg                
316 E Utica St
Sellersburg, IN 47172
(812) 246-3821