Thursday, October 27, 2016

Charlestown, Indiana

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
 South East Edition
Charlestown, Indiana
County - Clark
Area Total - 2.3 sq mi
Elevation 591 ft
Population (2013) Total - 7,990
ZIP code 47111
Area code(s) 812
History
Charlestown, Indiana draws its name from the man who surveyed the town when it was established in 1808, Charles Beggs. Begs platted the town on 195 acres located within the 150,000 acre Clark Grant. To spur development, the town's developers used the proceeds from the sale of the first 30 lots sold to build community buildings around the three acres in the center that had been set aside for use as a town square.
This strategy paid off, as the new town grew quickly and was designated the county seat of Clark County in 1812. In 1809, future first governor of the new State of Indiana, Jonathan Jennings, moved to the new town from Pennsylvania. The town remained the county seat until 1878 when the county government was moved to nearby Jeffersonville.
The town's fortunes improved in 1940 when the United States government selected the town as the site for a plant to make smokeless gunpowder at the newly constructed Indiana Army Ammunition Plant. This swelled the population from 900 to 13,400, creating many problems for the town. This facility was abandoned in 1998. A portion of the property was given to Indiana Department of natural Resources to expand Charlestown State Park, and the remainder given to the Clark County Reuse Authority for use as a commerce center.
The 1960's brought urban renewal to Charlestown, Indiana. The town has expanded, built new buildings and parks and implemented other improvements.
Charles Beggs (October 30, 1775 - October 21, 1869)
The son of Thomas & Sarah Barnes Beggs, Charles was native to Rockingham County, Virginia. An accomplished equestrian, Beggs married Dorothy Trumbo on August 1, 1797. The couple would have six children before her death in 1811. Beggs would marry Mary Ruddell in 1813 and would have eight children with her. He and Dorothy moved to Kentucky upon their marriage. Disgusted by slavery, Beggs crossed the Ohio River to the Indiana Territory, settling near the Ohio River in 1800. He gained election to the territorial assembly. Beggs commanded the Indiana Militia, Company of Light Dragoons, at the Battle of Tippecanoe, serving from September 11, to November 23, 1811. In 1813, Beggs constructed a gristmill in the area. Beggs remained in Indiana until 1828, when he migrated to Morgan County, Illinois. He would pass away there on October 21, 1869.Morgan County, Illinois

Highways
Indiana State Road 3
Indiana State Road 62
Indiana State Road 403
Indiana State Road 160

Parks and Activities
Family Activities Park
Greenway Park,
Church Street Park
Charlestown State Park
For dining, lodging and event information in Charlestown, contact:

Charlestown City Hall
304 Main Cross St.
Charlestown, IN 47111
812-256-3422


© Indiana Places 2016

Friday, October 21, 2016

Borden, Indiana

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
 South East Edition
Borden, Indiana
County - Clark
Area - Total 1.1 sq mi
Elevation 561 ft
Population (2000) - Total 818
ZIP code 47106
Area code(s) 812

Borden is located on the northwest corner of Clark County on Indiana State Road 60. The town is about thirteen miles west of Sellersburg, Indiana. It is on the CSX Railroad line as it passes from New Albany Indiana to Salem Indiana. It is located in the northwest corner of Clark County.
History
Rhode Island native John Borden founded the town, which he called New Providence, in 1816. His son, William H. Borden, opened the Borden Institute in Borden in 1884. For more information on the Borden Institute, see the historical marker's text. The town renamed itself unofficial to Borden in honor of William H. Borden, who had been a main benefactor in the area. On December 29, 1994, the town officially changed the name from New Providence to Borden.
Borden, Indiana is located about six miles west of Deam Lake, which is accessed from Indiana State Road 60 via Waggoner Road.
For dining, lodging and other information in Borden, contact:

Borden, Indiana
125 West Street
Mailing address: P.O. Box 125
812-967-2234
townhall@bordenindiana.com

Events
Borden Valley Days Festival
Attractions
Deam Lake
Borden Park
Huber Orchard and Winery
Borden Historical Markers
Borden Institute Site

Tuesday, October 18, 2016

A Visit to McCormick’s Creek State Park

A Visit to McCormick’s Creek State Park

McCormick’s Creek State Park is the first state park established in Indiana in 1916. It was one hundred years after Indiana received Statehood. That was also when the first area resident, John McCormick, homesteaded 100 acres on the site. The park includes almost two thousand acres of forest, campground, trails and fun. McCormick's Creek flows through a rugged limestone canyon, cascading over waterfalls and rapids. It flows into the nearby White River that borders the park on the west. Guests may stay in Canyon Inn, one of the seven family cabins or in the campground. Park visitors will enjoy camping, hiking and fishing at McCormick’s Creek State Park. Visitors will learn everything they need to enjoy their visit to family friendly McCormick’s Creek State Park.

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Dearborn Historical Marker - The Price of Freedom

A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
Dearborn  Historical Marker - The Price of Freedom

 The Price of Freedom Marker image. Click for full size.
By Ginger Drenning, August 23, 2009
1. The Price of Freedom Marker
Inscription.
- - -( Center Section )- - -
( Center - Memorial )
+ + + THE PRICE OF FREEDOM + + +

Dedicated in Honor of All men and women who have served in the Armed Forces and Sacrificed Unselfishly for the Freedom of the United States of America

( Left - Memorial )
Serving those who served

( Seals of ::)
American Legion
Disabled American Veterans
Vietnam Veterans of America

( Right - Memorial )
Serving those who served

( Seals of :: )
Veterans of Foreign Wars
AMVETS - American Veterans of World War II
40 / 8

( Starting from the Left of the Entire Memorial )
( First - Memorial )

+ + + REVOLUTIONARY WAR + + +
Apr. 19, 1775 - - - Sept. 3, 1783
4,435 - Lives Lost

+ + + WAR OF 1812 + + +
June 18, 1812 - - - Jan. 8, 1815
2,260 - Lives Lost

+ + + MEXICAN WAR + + +
May 13, 1846 - - - Feb. 2, 1848
13,283 - Lives Lost

+ + + CIVIL WAR + + +
Apr. 12, 1861 - May 26, 1865
620,000 - Lives Lost

( Second - Memorial )

+ + + SPANISH AMERICAN WAR + + +
Apr. 25, 1898 - Dec. 10, 1898
2,446 - Lives Lost

+ + + World War I + + +
Apr. 6, 1917
Center Left - - The Price of Freedom Marker image. Click for full size.
By Ginger Drenning, August 23, 2009
2. Center Left - - The Price of Freedom Marker
- Nov. 11, 1918
116,516 - Lives Lost

+ + + World War II + + +
Dec. 7, 1941 - Dec. 31, 1946
405,399 - Lives Lost

+ + + KOREAN WAR + + +
June 25, 1950 - July 27, 1953
54,246 - Lives Lost

( Third - Memorial )
Angels
of Mercy

( Fourth - Memorial )
+ + + AIR FORCE + + +
Est. Aug. 1, 1907

Activity in the air began with the use of balloons by the Army for reconnaissance. The first aircraft in action was in 1916 against Pancho Villa in Mexico. On July 26, 1947 the National Security Act created the independent U. S. Air Force.
“”OFF WE GO INTO THE WILD BLUE YONDER”“

( Fifth - Memorial )
+ + + MARINES + + +
Est. Nov. 10, 1775

A proud group that fights in the air, on land and sea. They assault enemy held beaches. Securing the position for other forces, and guard our American Embassies. They have fought in all conflicts and proclaim that they are the “First to Fight for Right and Freedom”
“”SEMPER FIDELIS - ALWAYS FAITHFUL”“

( Sixth - Memorial )
+ + + ARMY + + +
Est. June 14, 1775

The first organized defense for the budding United States, and today still defends God, Liberty, and Country. It’s equipped
Center Right - - The Price of Freedom Marker image. Click for full size.
By Ginger Drenning, August 23, 2009
3. Center Right - - The Price of Freedom Marker
with the most modern weapons systems in the World, with troops that can be moved quickly to any global location where our interests are threatened.
“”THIS WE’LL DEFEND”“

( Past Center Section )
( First - Memorial )
+ + + COAST GUARD + + +
Est. Aug. 4, 1790

Formed to guard the coasts against smugglers. They police shorelines and harbors, enforce navigation regulations, and conduct searches from water and air for people lost at sea. They maintain transmitting stations that send navigation signals all over the World.
“”SEMPER PARATUS - ALWAYS READY”“

( Second - Memorial )
+ + + NAVY + + +
Est. Oct. 13, 1775

It controls the waters by defeating attacks in the air and on the sea. It also transports troops, equipment, and supplies. They have pioneered nuclear powered guided missiles. Superior technology makes our navy the most feared in the World.
“”ANCHORS AWAY”“

( Third - Memorial )
+ + + MERCHANT MARINES + + +
Est. 1775

The American colonies’ merchant fleet had the most ships destroyed during the Revolutionary War. Ship numbers increased during the 1800's, WW I and WW II. The cargo they carry aids greatly in defeating the enemy. Ship
Center Section - - The Price of Freedom Marker image. Click for full size.
By Ginger Drenning, August 23, 2009
4. Center Section - - The Price of Freedom Marker
types are dry-cargo and tankers, as well as passenger.
“”IN PEACE AND WAR”“

( Fourth - Memorial )
The Supreme
Sacrifice

( Fifth - Memorial )
+ + + VIETNAM WAR + + +
Aug. 4, 1964 - Jan. 27, 1973
58,167 - Lives Lost

+ + + GRENADA + + +
Oct. 25, 1983 - Nov. 2, 1983
19 - Lives Lost

+ + + PANAMA + + +
Dec. 20, 1989 - Jan. 31, 1990
23 - Lives Lost

+ + + DESERT SHIELD / STORM + + +
Aug. 7, 1990 - Apr. 1, 1991
390 - Lives Lost

( Sixth - Memorial )
+ + + SOMALIA + + +
Dec. 9, 1992 - Mar. 28, 1994
44 - Lives Lost

( Back of Entire Memorial )
( First Right - Memorial )
The Veterans Memorial Committee
expresses appreciation to the
Dearborn County Government
for their approval and support of
this monument on June 3, 1991

COMMISSIONERS

R. Rodney Dennerline, Pres.
Robert A. Hoffmeier
Barrott H. Nanz

COUNCIL

James B. Wismann, Pres.
Vera Benning
Larry W. Givan
Kathy S. Klump
Dennis A. Kraus
George (Bo) Lansing
Randall J. Lyness

ADMINISTRATOR
Louis J. Meyer

ATTORNEY
William K. Ewan

AUDITOR
Jackie Stutz
(
First Left Memorial - - The Price of Freedom Marker image. Click for full size.
By Ginger Drenning, August 23, 2009
5. First Left Memorial - - The Price of Freedom Marker
Second Right - Memorial )
“ Veteran’s Memorial Committee “
CHAIRPERSON
Patricia Fox

VICE CHAIRMAN
Herbert Poole

SECRETARY
Melba Earles

TREASURER
Della Holliday

MEMBERS
Robert Hedrick
Clarence Batchelor
Ken Hylton
Glynn Clark
Joe Koch
Al Werner
Ronald Woodward
Mike Klump
Paul McKinley
Dorothea McKinley
Donald Earles
Red Childers
Edwin Powell
Carroll E. Ammons
Marcus Holliday
Annie Werner

Erected 1994 by Veteran's Memorial Committee.

Location. 39° 5.482' N, 84° 50.991' W.
Marker is in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, in Dearborn County.
Marker is on Mary Street north of West High Street, on the left when traveling north.
located on the South/East lawn of the Dearborn County Courthouse in Lawrenceburg, Indiana.
Marker is at or near this postal address: 215 West High Street, Lawrenceburg IN 47025, United States of America.

Monday, October 17, 2016

Dearborn County Historical Markers - A Historic Road Less Traveled

A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
Dearborn County Historical Markers - A Historic Road Less Traveled 

Near Aurora in Ohio County, Indiana — The American Midwest (Great Lakes)

A Historic Road Less Traveled
By Duane Hall, May 21, 2013

Inscription.
Who would think that a country road would hold so much history? Old State Highway 56 takes you past the historic Speakman-Tallentire house and to a famous bridge.

Elderly Stephen S. Speakman was in love with a young Kentucky belle who agreed to marry him if he built her a magnificent house. With the help of slave labor borrowed from his bride's Kentucky home, the elegant Greek Revival-style Speakman-Tallentire house was completed in 1845. It sits on a rise near the Laughery Creek. Although now overgrown, it once had a view of the Creek, and across the Ohio River to Kentucky. Bricks used to build it were made right on the premises. The home is now a private residence, not open to the public, and should be viewed from the roadside.

Travel past the Speakman-Tallentire House and see the three-span, 302 foot "Triple Whipple Bridge," built in 1878 that joins Ohio and Dearborn Counties. It is the only remaining bridge of its type in the country, and is named for the nineteenth century bridge designer Squire Whipple, who designed a special system of supports. The bridge's historic significance earned it a place in the National Register of Historic Places. The bridge is presently closed to vehicular traffic but has been rehabilitated for pedestrian use.

Visitors are encouraged to visit a neighboring Ohio River
Old State Road 56 is behind the marker
Scenic site just to the north of here at Riverview Cemetery.

By the Way: Indiana has more than 6,000 bridges, many of them considered historic treasures.

Location. 39° 1.267' N, 84° 53.02' W.
Marker is near Aurora, Indiana, in Ohio County.
Marker is at the intersection of Hartford Pike and Old State Road 56, on the right when traveling north on Hartford Pike. Click for map.
Marker is in this post office area: Aurora IN 47001, United States of America.

Brief History by the Author
Stephen S. Speakman (October 28, 1804 - October 18, 1848)
The son of Micajah Speakman Jr. and Phebe Speakman, Stephen is a native of Concord, Pennsylvania. He married Mary Speakman, with whom he had four children. Mary passed away and he married Sarah Bush on December 14, 1843. Speakman is buried in Riverview Cemetery.

Triple Whipple Bridge
http://historicbridges.org/bridges/browser/?bridgebrowser=truss/triplewhipple/
Built by the Wrought Iron Bridge Company of Canton, Ohio in 1878, the bridge is the last of its kind remaining in the United States. The 297 foot long, bridge spans Laughery Creek. The bridge is closed to traffic, but after 2008 rehabilitation, the bridge was opened to pedestrian traffic. The National Register of Historic Places listed it on September 29, 1976.

Approximate latitude, longitude
+39.02461, -84.88586   (decimal degrees)
39°01'29" N, 84°53'09" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
16/683012/4321634 (zone/easting/northing)
Bridgehunter.com ID BH 16011

Friday, October 14, 2016

Dearborn County Historical Markers - The Spirits of Lawrenceburg


Dearborn County Historical Markers - The Spirits of Lawrenceburg

A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
The Spirits of Lawrenceburg

By Duane Hall, May 21, 2013

Inscription
Army Captain Samuel Colville Vance was a surveyor for the United States government living in Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1802, he purchased all the land comprising the original town of "Lawrenceburg." At that time, the land was part of Hamilton County, Ohio. Soon, settlers made their homes near the Ohio River and surrounding creeks. Like many Ohio River towns, Lawrenceburg's economy centered on the Ohio River, and the shipping and related industries it enabled. However, some unusual industries thrived. In the 1800s, cigars were made here, and were considered some of the finest in the world. Lawrenceburg had buggy manufacturers as well. An early automobile, the James Model A Roadster was produced here in 1909.

Distilleries were found in the Lawrenceburg area as early as 1809. By the end of 1855, Lawrenceburg was home to Hobbs Distillery, John H. Gaff & Son, N.J. Walsh Distillery, Nicholas Oester, Frederick Rodenburg & Co. and John B. Garnier Brewery. Purchased in 1933 from the Rossville Distillery Company, the Seagram's plant is a reminder of the distillery days of old Lawrenceburg.

Visitors can see Captain Vance's spectacular West High Street home which he built in 1818. Known as the Vance-Tousey House, it is considered one of Indiana's finest examples of Federal architecture, and is listed in the National Register of Historic
At the southwest corner of Lawrenceburg Newtown Park
Places. It is now the home of The Dearborn County Historical Society and open to the public.
By the Way: Captain Vance named the town Lawrenceburgh after his wife's maiden name, Lawrence.

Location. 39° 5.709' N, 84° 51.472' W.
Marker is in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, in Dearborn County.
Marker is at the intersection of 2nd Street and Main Street, on the right when traveling west on 2nd Street.
Marker is located in Lawrenceburg Newtown Park fronting 2nd Street.
Marker is in this post office area: Lawrenceburg IN 47025, United States of America.

Brief History by the Author
Samuel Colville Vance
See Lawrenceburg history

James Model A Roadster
The J. & M. Motor Car Company operated in Lawrenceburg from 1909 until 1911. The company only produced a few of these automobiles during its short lifetime.

Hobbs Distillery
Established during the economic boom that followed the construction of the Whitewater Canal in 1837, a fire destroyed the distillery in 1839. Rebuilt by Hobbs and Craft, fire again ravaged the building in 1850. The distillery ceased operations after the second fire.

John H. Gaff & Son
Businessman John H. Gaff and his brother Thomas built their distillery, the T & J.W. Gaff & Company Distillery, in Lawrenceburg into a nationwide business. For more on the distillery, see Hillforest Mansion. The distillery began operation in 1843 as the T & J.W. Gaff & Company Distillery on the bank of Hogan Creek in Aurora. The distillery merged with the Fleischmann distilleries.
John H. Gaff (September 30, 1820 - February 26, 1879)
The son of James and Margaret Wilson Gaff, Thomas was native to Springfield, New Jersey. After completing his common school education, he apprenticed to a jeweler, Mr. Ackerson in New York City. Tiring of the jeweler’s trade, he migrated to Mexico, settling in Mexico City until 1845, when he came to Aurora to join his brother Thomas in the distillery business. During this time in Aurora, he served as mayor for two terms. Sometime in 1851, he moved to Newburgh, New York to marry Margaret G. Lendrum. The couple would have five children. Gaff returned to Aurora in 1864 to continue with the distillery, where he remained until his death in 1879.

Rossville Distillery
Founded in 1847, the Cincinnati based James Walsh & Company acquired it in 1875. The James Walsh & Company operated the distillery in Lawrenceburg until 1932, when a fire destroyed much of the plant. In 1902, the plant has a daily mashing capacity of 5,000 bushels of grain, storage space for 60,000 barrel in its warehouses.  Facilities included four steel grain elevators holding 200,000 bushels, and two slop dryers that held 5,000 bushels of feed. The Joseph E Seagram and Sons Company acquired the site in 1933. Pernod Ricard purchased the plant in 2001 and has continued operations.

 John B. Garnier Brewery
 Founded by John B. Garnier, the John B. Garnier Brewery operated from 1857 until 1866.
 John B. Garnier (August 15 1820 - March 7, 1897)
A native of France, Garnier migrated to the United States in 1845. He came to Lawrenceburg on June 17, 1847, where he opened a malt house. He married Mary E. Dafner, with whom he would have three children. The success of the malt house led to his opening a brewery in 1857. His beer became popular in the Dearborn County area. He would continue brewing beer after the brewery closed until his death in 1897.

Thursday, October 13, 2016

Indiana Historical Marker - Canal Junction

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South East Edition
Title of Marker:
Canal Junction
Location:
NW corner of Whitewater River bridge at Campbell & State Streets across railroad tracks, south side of West Harrison. (Dearborn County, Indiana)
Installed by:
1999 Indiana Historical Bureau, Canal Society of Indiana, and Dearborn County Historical Society.
Marker ID #:
15.1999.1
Marker Text: 
Side one:
The Whitewater Canal and the Cincinnati and Whitewater Canal joined in Harrison to provide better access to Cincinnati markets and Ohio River. Indiana Internal Improvement Act 1836 authorized Whitewater Canal; completed from Brookville to Lawrenceburg 1839. Nearby Dam No. 1 on Whitewater River created a pool for canal boats to cross the river.
Side two:
Cincinnati and Whitewater Canal incorporated by Ohio General Assembly 1837. Completed seven miles from Harrison (now West Harrison), Indiana to Dry Fork Creek, Ohio 1840. Twenty-five mile canal opened 1843 when 1, 782 foot tunnel completed at Cleves, Ohio. Traffic diverted to Cincinnati on this interstate transportation link diminished Lawrenceburg's importance as a market.

Brief History by the Author
Canals reigned supreme during the early part of the Nineteenth Century before the advent of the railroads. They provided a cheap, fast means of transporting goods overland. They had grave disadvantages, though. They were expensive to build and maintain. It was only possible to construct them in favorable terrain. Indiana and Ohio both embarked on canal building programs and managed to link their systems here, at the junction of the Cincinnati and Whitewater Canal and the Whitewater Canal.
Whitewater Canal 
The Whitewater Canal's construction lasted from 1836 to 1847. During this time, there were many starts and pauses as the State of Indiana ran out of money and the various private companies charged with completing also ran into financial difficulties. After completion, it connected Hagerstown, Indiana with Cincinnati, Ohio seventy-six miles to the south. The canal provided a quick, convenient way for farmers to transport their goods to market in the cities. Before the canal a farmer would need several days travel over deeply rutted roads to take his goods to Cincinnati. The canal proved a difficult construction project. It dropped 491 feet over the distance and needed fifty-six locks and seven dams. Several aqueducts to carry the canal over waterways also needed construction. The canal operated until 1862. The Whitewater Valley Railroad runs a part of the canal as a tourist attraction between Connersville and Metamora Indiana. The train runs alongside the canal and at Metamora visitors can ride a canal boat. The town of Metamora has many small shops and museums. The State of Indiana maintains an operating gristmill in the town.
For more information contact:
Whitewater Valley Railroad
455 Market St,
Connersville, IN 47331
(765) 825-2054

Cincinnati and Whitewater Canal 
When Indiana proposed building the Whitewater Canal, Cincinnati merchants persuaded a consortium of private investors and the State of Ohio to fund a spur to connect with it. This fourteen miles spur was constructed between 1839 and 1843. It included a canal tunnel, one of the few constructed in the United States. The canal was eventually abandoned and has silted up over the years from flooding and disuse. The Indianapolis and Cincinnati Railroad purchased the canal in 1862 and used the canal towpath for a rail line. The tunnel, used for a time as a railroad tunnel, still exists and is on the National Register of Historic Places. President William Henry Harrison owned part of the land the canal needed and donated some land towards it. He is buried on a ridge over the tunnel. The Ohio Historical Society has a historical marker near its northern portal.


Wednesday, October 12, 2016

Dearborn Historical Marker — Guilford Covered Bridge

Guilford Covered Bridge
Guilford Covered Bridge 

August 22, 2015
Inscription. Built 1879 
Original Design by Archibald M. Kennedy and Sons
Additional Structural Supports added in the early 1900s to sustain heavier loads produced by Guilford's rail commerce
Moved from Yorkridge Rd to park in 1960
Damaged by fire in 1993
Restored in 1997 by LL Brown Co. and the Amos Schwartz Co
For the Dearborn County Park and Recreation Board
And the Dearborn County Commissioners
Location. 39° 10.215' N, 84° 54.508' W. 
Marker is in Guilford, Indiana, in Dearborn County. 
Marker can be reached from Main Street. 
Marker is inside the bridge on the right side as you pass under the bridge from the road.
The Bridge is located in the Guilford Covered Bridge Park. 
Marker is at or near this postal address: 
4785 Main Street, Guilford IN 47022, United States of America. 

Brief History by the Author
Guilford Covered Bridge
Guilford has the last remaining covered bridge in Dearborn County, constructed by noted bridge builder Archibald M. Kennedy & Sons of Rushville. Mr. Kennedy was hired by the County Commissioners in 1879 to construct the 101 foot long bridge spanning East Fork Tanners Creek. Because the bridge was to be torn down and replaced by a concrete bridge in 1961 the people of the county banded together to save the old structure. The populace of Guilford raised the funds needed to tear it down and move it to its current location, in the Guilford Covered Bridge Park, at the intersection of Indiana State Road 1 and York Ridge Road. An arsonist damaged the bridge in 1993, locals restored the bridge in 1997.  Visitors to the park drive through the bridge as they enter the park.
Archibald Kennedy (August 25, 1818  - June 3, 1897)
A native of Guilford County, North Carolina, he was the son of E. L. Kennedy and Martha Kennedy. The family moved to Fayette County, Indiana in 1818. He started working as a carpenter in 1841 and started building covered bridges as a side business in 1853. his first bridge was a two span bridge over the east fork of the Whitewater River in Franklin County. Archibald showed prowess as a bridgebuilder and this soon became his chief occupation. He passed the bridge building buisness on to his sons who in turn passed it on to their sons. The family bridge buildinig business lasted three generations and during that time they built at least fifty-eight bridges. 

Approximate latitude, longitude
+39.17017, -84.90867   (decimal degrees)
39°10'13" N, 84°54'31" W   (degrees°minutes'seconds")
Approximate UTM coordinates
16/680665/4337743 (zone/easting/northing)

Tuesday, October 11, 2016

Dearborn County Historical Marker - Lawrenceburg - Founded 1802

A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
Dearborn County Historical Marker - Lawrenceburg - Founded 1802

Lawrenceburg - Founded 1802
By Duane Hall, May 21, 2013
1. Lawrenceburg Marker
Inscription
Birthplace of two Indiana Governors. Albert Gallatin Porter, eighteenth Governor (1881-1885), born here April 20, 1824, died Indianapolis, May 3, 1897; and Winfield Taylor Durbin, twenty-fourth Governor (1901-1905), born here May 4, 1847, died Anderson, December 18, 1928.
 Erected 1976 by Dearborn County Bicentennial Committee.
 Marker series. This marker is included in the Spirit of 76, America's Bicentennial Celebration marker series.


Location 39° 5.762' N, 84° 51.481' W.
Marker is in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, in Dearborn County.
Marker is at the intersection of Green Boulevard (U.S. 50) and Park Street, on the right when traveling east on Green Boulevard.
Marker is located in Lawrenceburg Newton Park fronting Green Blvd (US50).
Marker is in this post office area:
Lawrenceburg IN 47025, United States of America.

Brief History by the Author
Albert Gallatin Porter (April 20, 1824 – May 3, 1897)
The son of Thomas and Myra Tousey Porter, Albert is native to Lawrenceburg, Indiana. The family farm's location on the banks of the Ohio River made it possible for Porter to earn his college money by tending his father's ferry. He attended Hanover College in Madison until his funds ran out. An uncle offered to pay his tuition if he attended a Methodist College, thus he attended and graduated from Asbury College in Wilmore, Kentucky. After completing college, he returned to Lawrenceburg to study law. A Democrat, he served as the private secretary to Governor James Whitcomb. Porter would marry Whitcomb's daughter, Minerva, on November 20, 1846. The couple would have five children.
Politics
During the time he served as the governor's secretary, Porter also worked as the reporter for the Indiana Supreme Court, writing for the Indianapolis Journal. The political chaos after the Kansas-Nebraska Act of 1854 allowed the expansion of slavery into United States territories. During the dissention in the Democratic Party between pro-slavery and anti-slavery factions, the pro-slavery people won. The party expunged many anti-slavery members, Porter among them. He joined the new Republican Party, gaining election to the United States House of Representatives in 1858 and 1860.
Private Practice
After his term expired in 1862, Porter returned to private life, working as a lawyer. President Rutherford P. Hayes appointed him as comptroller of the United States Treasury in 1877, a position he held until 1880.
Governor
The Republicans nominated him for governor in 1880, a post he won by a narrow margin. During his two terms, Porter was instrumental in establishing hospitals for the insane, the State Board of Health and introducing a drainage program for marshlands and the Great Kankakee Swamp in northwestern Indiana. This program added hundreds of agricultural acres to the state. He also advocated women's suffrage and helped institutive stricter mining regulations, which helped improve the working conditions for miners.
Out of Office
Porter remained active after his term expired, serving as a delegate to the 1888 Republican National Convention. As delegate, he delivered a speech nominating his old law partner and friend, Benjamin Harrison, for President. Harrison won and named Porter as Minister to Italy in 1889. He held this position until he resigned in 1892. He returned to Indianapolis and began collecting material for a History of Indiana. He died before finishing the task. The work remains unpublished. His remains are interred in Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis.

Winfield Taylor Durbin (May 4, 1847 – December 18, 1928)
The son of William S. and Eliza Ann Sparks, Winfield was native to Lawrenceburg, Indiana. The family moved to New Philadelphia, Indiana in Washington County while he was young. His father opened a tannery business, which Winfield worked in while a boy. When the Civil War broke out, Winfield and his brothers enlisted in the 16th Indiana Volunteer Infantry in 1862. The Army rejected him because of an arm injury he had recently suffered. Durban later enlisted in the 139th Regiment Indiana Infantry, which mustered in on June 5, 1864. Durban helped raise a company for the regiment, which went on to the Siege of Vicksburg and duty in Arkansas.
After the War
Durban returned to Indiana after a brief stint attending a small college in St. Louis, Missouri. For a short time, he worked as the bookkeeper for a dry goods store in Indianapolis. After migrating to Anderson, he met and married Bertha McCullough, with whom he would have two children. He worked for his father in law at the Citizens' Bank in Anderson. During this time the Gas Boom occurred. He and his father-in-law founded several small businesses, which allowed him to accumulate a modest amount of wealth. During this time, he became active politically, gaining election to the State Republican Central Committee.
Spanish-American War
The Spanish American War broke out in 1898. Governor James Mount appointed Durbin as colonel in command of the 161st Regiment Indiana Infantry. The recruits of this regiment came mainly from Hammond, Mount Vernon, Shelbyville, Madison, Jeffersonville, Richmond, New Castle, Rushville, Monticello, Columbus, Michigan City and Lawrenceburg. It mustered in on July 15, 1898. The regiment was part of the Havana occupation during the war. The occupation lasted for three months. The regiment mustered out on April 30, 1899, after which Durbin returned to Indianapolis.
Governor
The Republican Party nominated Durbin for governor in 1900. Durbin won the election, becoming the seventh and last Civil War veteran to serve as Indiana governor. During his term, a major embezzlement scheme at Indiana University surfaced. He threatened to move the university away from Bloomington if university officials did not clear it up. He advocated election reform and set up juvenile courts for young offenders. The growth of the use of automobiles led him to realize the importance of Indiana's central position in the United States. He began advocating for improved roads and highways in the state. He also used firm measures to end the vigilante white cap groups that operated throughout the state. This virtually ended the lawless lynchings that plagued Indiana previously.
Post Governorship
Durbin would run again for governor in 1912, but lose his bid. He remained active in politics and pursued his Anderson business interests. He passed away on December 18, 1928 in Anderson. He is interred in Crown Hill Cemetery in Indianapolis.

Friday, October 7, 2016

Dearborn County Historical Marker - Medal of Honor Citations

A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
Dearborn County Historical Marker - Medal of Honor Citations
Medal of Honor Citations
Civil War
By Ginger Drenning, August 23, 2009
Inscription.
Dearborn County
Medal of Honor Citations
Civil War
Name Awarded
Pvt. William Shepherd - - May 3, 1865
Pvt. Frank Stolz - - July 9, 1894
Pvt. David H. Helms - - - July 26, 1894
Pvt. Thomas A. Blasdel - - - August 11, 1894
Pvt. John W. Conaway - - - - August 11, 1894
Pvt. William W. Chisman - - - August 15, 1894

Erected 1966 by Legion Posts of Dearborn County.
 Marker series. This marker is included in the Medal of Honor Recipients marker series.

Location. 39° 5.455' N, 84° 50.995' W.
Marker is in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, in Dearborn County.
Marker is on West High Street west of Mary Street, on the right when traveling west.
Located on the left pillar - of the front entry of Dearborn County Courthouse in Lawrenceburg, Indiana.
Marker is at or near this postal address:
215 West High Street, Lawrenceburg IN 47025, United States of America.

Brief History of the Medal of Honor
Established by an act of Congress on December 21, 1862, the law authorized a December 9 resolution introduced by Iowa Senator James W. Grimes. This Medal of Honor was to "promote the efficiency of the Navy," by awarding a medal for acts that went above and beyond the call of duty. Congress authorized an Army version on July 12, 1862. The Air Force received a version on April 14, 1965. The Medal of Honor is awarded only to members of the United States Military.  Marines and Coast Guard personnel receive the naval version of the Medal.
Awarding the Medal of Honor
Typically, a request for awarding a Medal of Honor ascends up through the chain of command from the proposed recipient’s commanding officer until it reaches the Secretary of Defense, who will pass the recommendation on to a member of Congress. Typically, this member is from the proposed recipients Congressional District. Alternatively, a member of Congress can introduce a resolution without this chain of command. The chain of command process can take up to eighteen months to complete. If Congress approves the resolution to award the Medal of Honor to an individual, the President of the United States personally awards the Medal to the recipient at a White House ceremony, in the name of Congress. If the award is posthumous, or the recipient is unable to participate, the next of kin will receive the award in their stead. Currently Congress has awarded 3,515 Medals of Honor since its establishment during the Civil War.
Current guidelines for awarding the Medal of Honor, established by Congress in 1963:
1.  While engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States;
2, while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or,
3, while serving with friendly forces engaged in armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party.

Congressional Medal of Honor Society
40 Patriots Point Road
Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464
medalhq@cmohs.org

Historical Marker Project.- Medal of Honor Recipients


Thursday, October 6, 2016

Dearborn County Historical Markers - World War II War Memorial

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South East Edition
Dearborn County Historical Markers - World War II War Memorial

Dearborn County World War II War Memorial
World War II War Memorial Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Ginger Drenning, August 23, 2009
1. World War II War Memorial Marker
Inscription.
WORLD WAR II
For God and Country
This tablet is erected in honor of the men who answered their country's call and gave their lives for freedom

Location. 39° 5.457' N, 84° 50.993' W.
Marker is in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, in Dearborn County.
Marker is on West High Street west of Mary Street, on the right when traveling west.
Located on the pillar - to the left of the front door - of the Dearborn County Courthouse in Lawrenceburg, Indiana.
Marker is in this post office area: Lawrenceburg IN 47025, United States of America.


World War II (1939 - 1945)
In Europe
At the end of World War I, most of the European nations blamed Germany for the war and wished to make her pay for the war. The Armistice imposed severe reparations on Germany, stripped her of her overseas territories and reduced Germany's home territory. The armistice also imposed restrictions on the size and scope of the German military. The German Empire collapsed in the aftermath, replaced by a republic called the Weimar Republic. The Great Depression combined with severe inflation to produce a horrible economy in Germany. The Nazi leader Adolph Hitler took advantage of the deplorable conditions to maneuver into becoming the Chancellor of Germany in 1933.
Arming for War
Hitler began rearming Germany, defying treaties as he did so. At his direction, Germany signed alliance treaties with Italy and Japan. Hoping to counter the German rise, Great Britain and France signed treaties of alliance. Hitler, in an attempt to prevent the two-war front that had hampered the German military in World War I, signed a non-aggression treaty with the Soviet Union. On September 1, 1939, Germany invaded Poland. Seventeen days later, the Soviet Union invaded Poland from the east. Germany and the Soviet Union divided the nation between them. In 1940 Germany invaded, and conquered, Sweden, Norway, France and several other European countries. By late 1940 Germany, Russia and Italy controlled the European Continent. Britain alone escaped invasion and by late 1940 was engaged in a fight for its life.
Asia
Japan had continued its expansionist policy begun in the years before World War I. By 1941, it had invaded China, Indo-China, the Philippines and many other islands and nations in the Pacific Ocean. The Japanese viewed the United States as a threat to its power and its sea-lanes. To knock the United States naval fleet out of the war, the Japanese attacked the naval base on Pearl Harbor in Hawaii on December 7, 1941. The United States declared war on Japan on December 8, 1941. By virtue of the treaties signed by the various nations, Germany and Italy declared war on the United States, who followed suit. By late December 1941, the world was again at war.
A Brief Summary
World War II was a vast conflict involving several theaters, hundreds, if not thousands, of battles. The scale of the war is beyond the scope of this article. After expending vast supplies of lives and treasure, the Allied powers of the United States, Great Britain and France eventually prevailed. Germany had betrayed the Russians and invaded the nation, thus the Soviets joined the alliance against Germany. The Allies invaded continental Europe on June 6, 1944. This invasion, known as D-Day, allowed United States and British forces to establish a tenuous toehold on the continent. It would take almost a year of hard driving warfare to occupy Germany and force surrender on May 8, 1945. The war in the Pacific raged on. The United States employed a strategy called "Island Hopping." They captured Japanese island strongholds one at a time. The names of the battles were many, including Iwo Jima, Guadalcanal, Gwaum and many others. By August 1945 the United States and Britain had captured most of the Japanese fortress islands. Only Japan remained. The Japanese had rejected demand for unconditional surrender. During the war, the United States had developed a powerful weapon, the atomic bomb. Hoping to force surrender and save thousands of lives, President Harry Truman authorized the use of an atomic bomb. United States bombers delivered two bombs a few days apart, hitting Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The horrible destruction caused by the bombs forced the Japanese to surrender, on August 15, 1945. The cost of the war was dear, over 8 million military deaths and 45 million civilian deaths. United States military deaths totaled 416,800.

Wednesday, October 5, 2016

Dearborn County Historical Marker - Vietnam War Memorial

Dearborn County Historical Marker - Vietnam War Memorial

A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana

Vietnam War Memorial
Dearborn County Indiana
Inscription.
In God We Trust
In Grateful remembrance of the men of Dearborn County who gave their lives in the Vietnam War, erected by the Citizens of Dearborn County, Indiana.
Honor Roll, first column:
William Omer Burkett • Thomas Denning • Larry Arthur Diefenbach • Larry Fogle • Harvey D. Gray • David Hemphill • Donald Ray Henry • Clabe Herald, Jr. • Neil Philip Farmer
Honor Roll, second column:
Ronald A. Hoff • Kenneth Wayne Lozier • Dale K. McLanahan • Ronald W. Montgomery • Richard Wayne Sanders • William M. Treadway • Orville Wells • Robert J. Williamson
 Erected by Citizens of Dearborn County.

Location. 39° 5.46' N, 84° 50.988' W.
Marker is in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, in Dearborn County.
Marker is on West High Street west of Mary Street, on the right when traveling west.
Located on the right most front pillar as you face the Dearborn County Courthouse in Lawrenceburg, Indiana.
Marker is at or near this postal address:
215 West High Street, Lawrenceburg IN 47025, United States of America.

Other nearby markers. At least 8 other markers are within walking distance of this marker. Dearborn County (here, next to this marker); Dearborn County World War I War Memorial
Long View - - Vietnam War Memorial Marker Photo, Click for full size
By Ginger Drenning, August 23, 2009
2. Long View - - Vietnam War Memorial Marker
The marker is on last pillar to the right in the photo.
(here, next to this marker); Dearborn County Korean War Memorial (here, next to this marker); Dearborn County World War II War Memorial (a few steps from this marker); Dearborn County American Revolution War Memorial (a few steps from this marker); Medal of Honor Citations (a few steps from this marker); The Price of Freedom (within shouting distance of this marker); Lawrenceburgh (approx. 0.2 miles away). Click for a list of all markers in Lawrenceburg.

Brief History by the Author:
The Beginnings of the Vietnam War
The Vietnam War had its roots in colonial French control of the area then called Indo-China, dating from the 1850's. French colonial rule continued for over seventy years.  Various opposition rebel groups fought against French rule, but none had any success. In 1940, the Japanese invaded and occupied the area. The French colonial authorities had allied themselves with the French Vichy regime in France that collaborated with their Nazi conquerors. The Japanese occupiers of Indochina, in turn, collaborated with the French colonial officials. After the Allies drove German troops from France, the Vichy regime collapsed. Fearing the French officials, the Japanese jailed the French and set up a puppet regime in Indo-China. The Japanese troops surrendered to Allied troops in September 1945 after the main Japanese surrender. However, they were the only ones capable of controlling the area, thus the Allies left them in place.
Viet Minh
The Viet Minh had organized in the early 1940's primarily to oppose the French. After the Japanese invasion, they then opposed them. After the Japanese became largely inactive after September 1945, they managed to launch successfully the August Revolution, in which they took command of the country.
British Occupation and Departure
The Allies were adamant that the area still belonged to the French, but as the French had no means to defend or control the country, British forces occupied the southern part of the country and the Nationalist Chinese occupied the north. The Viet Minh won elections across northern Vietnam. They agreed to allow French military personnel to replace the Chinese in exchange for French recognition of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam. French military personnel arrived in Hanoi in March and began a military operation that cleared all the Viet Minh from the city. The British army departed Vietnam in March 1946.
First Indo-China War
The Viet Minh commenced a guerilla war against the French, support now by the People's Republic of China. The Viet Minh had communist ties and the support of the Communist Chinese reinforced this. The French began receiving United States support in the 1950 in the form of weapons and advisors who helped train the fledgling South Vietnamese Army. The war transitioned from a civil war to a Cold War conflict. At the Battle of Dien Bien Phu Viet Minh forces delivered a devastating defeat to the French. The French subsequently abandoned Viet Nam in 1954. The Viet Minh continued their struggle against the South Vietnamese government, which had gained its independence.
Division of Vietnam
During the 1954 Geneva Conference the Soviet Union, the United States, France, the United Kingdom, and the People’s Republic of China came to an agreement that divided Vietnam along the 17th parallel. The United States continued to support the South Vietnam government.
Escalation of the War
President Dwight D. Eisenhower supported the South Vietnamese with weapons and advisors, but resisted expansion of the war. When President Kennedy was inaugurated in 1960, the "Domino Theory" dominated political thought. The fear was that if South Vietnam fell to the communist Viet Minh, the Southeast Asian nations of Laos, Cambodia and Thailand would follow. During the Kennedy administration United States Military personnel in South Vietnam grew from the 900 advisors placed there by President Kennedy to 16,000 at the time of Kennedy's assassination. The conflict continued to escalate after President Lyndon Johnson took office. Fearing a communist takeover after the South Vietnamese regime began to collapse. Johnson increased troop strength during his administration to 265,000 troops.
War Protests
Civil protests against the escalation of the war grew during the middle to late 1960's. Opposition to the war became so politically volatile that President Johnson abandoned his reelection campaign. His Vice President ran and gained the Democratic nomination for President. Richard Nixon gained the Republican nomination and the Presidency in 1968, partly on his proposed" Vietnamization" policy. War protests on college campuses and other places continued, resulting in the Kent Massacre in 1970, in which four college protesters were killed by National Guard troops during a protest.
Drawdown and the Fall of South Vietnam
Nixon began his drawdown of troops in 1970.  He escalated it after his 1972 reelection. The last troops left March 5, 1971. Nixon used bombing runs by B-52's to support the South Vietnamese troops. The Democratic Party continued to oppose him, and forced his resignation in 1974 over the Watergate crises. Using the political turmoil created by the resignation, they cut the military support budget to South Vietnam, weakening the regime. The communist insurgents in the south, bolstered by their aid from the Chinese, continued their success against the beleaguered South Vietnamese until Saigon fell on April 30, 1975. United States military helicopters had evacuated the last of the United States officials under heavy gunfire on April 29.
The United States lost 58,315 soldiers and suffered 303,644 wounded during the war.

Tuesday, October 4, 2016

Dearborn County Historical Marker - Dearborn County World War I War Memorial

A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana

Dearborn County World War I War Memorial
By Ginger Drenning, August 23, 2009
Inscription.
Honor Roll
In Grateful remembrance of the boys of Dearborn County who gave their lives in the World War 1917 - 1918.
Erected by the Citizens of Dearborn County, Indiana

Walter Ahrens • Henry Fred Amm • Elmer Andrews • Hobart S. Bailey • Harry Bales • Louis A. Bartels • Raymond F. Beard • Floyd Becker • Charles H. Bildner • John V. Bildner • John R. Boyd • Bernard H. Burke • Harvey J. Clarke • Millard Dennerline • Edwin F. Engelking • Edwin M. Fox • William J. Haske • Dewey H. Hauck • Otto G. Hammerle • George Henry Johnson • Ervin H. Laaker • David H. McCallister • Thomas Miles • Michael George Miller • Julius J. Miller • Stanley Northcutt • Charles E. Orsborn • Albinus L. Ratz • William Keith Ross • Harvey H. Rusche • Charles Lloyd Singer • Howard Slayback • Halstead F. Scott • Henry F. Scharf • Frederick C. Steele • Russell Winkley • Earl White • Roy Lee White
Erected by Citizens of Dearborn County.

Location. 39° 5.46' N, 84° 50.989' W. Marker is in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, in Dearborn County.
Marker is on West High Street west of Mary Street, on the right when traveling west.
Located on the right pillar as you enter the front door (West Wide View - - World War I War Memorial Marker Photo
High Street) to the Dearborn County Courthouse in Lawrenceburg, Indiana.
Marker is at or near this postal address: 215 West High Street, Lawrenceburg IN 47025, United States of America.

Brief History by the Author
World War I (July 28, 1914 - November 11, 1918)
Known for many years as the Great War, World War I commenced when a Serbian nationalist, Gavrilo Princip, assassinated the Austro-Hungarian heir to the throne, Archduke Franz Ferdinand. The assassination occurred while the Archduke and his wife rode through the streets of Sarajevo, Bosnia in an open car. The assassination set off a chain of events that led to a protracted, disastrous war that lasted four long years. An estimated nine million soldiers died in the conflict, with another twenty million wounded. Historians estimate that over seven million civilians died in the conflict. Slavic Nationalism within the Austro-Hungarian Empire, entangling alliances and many other factors created what had been to that date the most destructive war in European history.
Austro-Hungarian Empire
Known by many names, the most common being Austria-Hungary, the Empire came into existence on March 30, 1867. The Empire consisted of a union between Austria, Hungary and the Kingdom of Croatia-Slavonia. It was an uneasy union; with the Slavic peoples of Serbia, Bosnia, Herzegovina and Croatia each having their own national government and a nationalist movement that demanded complete independence. By 1914, ethnic tensions had risen to a fever pitch. The Emperor of Austria, Franz Joseph I, feared that the nationalism would rip his empire apart.
Entangling Alliances
The "Balance of Power" in Europe included two main alliances. These were the Triple Entente (Allies) and the Central Powers. The Allies consisted of England, France and Russian Empire. Germany and Austria-Hungary comprised the Central Powers. The Ottoman Empire would join the alliance after the war began.
War Begins
The Austria-Hungary government decided that it would end the nationalist movement after the assassination. After receiving assurances from Germany that it would support them, they delivered an ultimatum to the Serbian government. The Serbs accepted nine of the ten demands, but vacillated on the tenth. In retaliation, Austria-Hungary declared war on July 28, 1914. The Russian Empire supported the Serbs and mobilized its troops. Germany began a two front offensive, invading France through Belgium and Luxembourg, leading Great Britain to declare war against Germany in support of its allies. Germany then invaded Russia. By late summer, the consortium of nations at war grew.
United States Neutral
The United States maintained a policy of neutrality, but its inclinations were towards the Allies. Germany had declared a policy of unrestricted submarine warfare, a policy that included torpedoing passenger ships it suspected of carrying munitions from the United States to Great Britain. The United State demanded a halt to this, a demand to which eventually Germany acceded. The resumption of this policy and the interception of the Zimmerman Telegram changed all of this.
Zimmerman Telegram
The Germans suspected that the United States would eventually enter the war on the side of the Allies. German Foreign Minister Arthur Zimmermann sent a telegram to the Mexican government, inviting them to join the alliance and declare war against the United States in January 1917. British intelligence intercepted the telegram, deciphered it and gave it to United States officials. An irate United States declared war against Germany on April 6, 1917. The United States was at war.
The United States in World War I
The war effort developed quickly. By summer 1917, the United States sent over ten thousand troops a day to Europe. In all, the nation would draft almost three million men for the war. The United States would suffer 116,516 casualties during the war, 53,402 in combat by the time the combatants signed an armistice on November 11, 1918.
Find more information and view archival photos of World War I at this link.

Monday, October 3, 2016

Dearborn County Historical Marker - Korean War Memorial

A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana
A Visit to Aurora and Lawrenceburg, Indiana


Dearborn County Korean War Memorial
By Ginger Drenning, August 23, 2009
Inscription.
KOREAN WAR
This plaque is dedicated in grateful remembrance of the men of Dearborn County who served their Country in the Korean War.
In God we trust

Erected by the Citizens of Dearborn County Indiana.
Location. 39° 5.458' N, 84° 50.991' W.
Marker is in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, in Dearborn County.
Marker is on West High Street west of Mary Street, on the right when traveling west.
located at the front entrance (on a pillar to the right) of the Dearborn County Courthouse in Lawrenceburg, Indiana.
Marker is at or near this postal address:
215 West High Street, Lawrenceburg IN 47025, United States of America.

Brief History by the Author
Korean War (June 25 - 1950)
The Korean War became the first armed conflict during the post World War II Cold War.
Historical Background
Korea occupies a peninsula northwest of Japan on that divides the Sea of Japan, the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea. Japan had taken advantage of the turmoil created by the Russo-Japanese War and annexed Korea using the Japan-Korea Annexation Treaty in 1910. Japan continued its expansionist policy in the years leading up to World War II, when its attack on the United States Naval base on Pearl Harbor brought the United States into war with Japan. By the end of the war, the United States had allied itself with Great Britain, France and the Soviet Union in their united effort to defeat the Axis powers of Japan, Germany and Italy. In the closing days of the war, the United States and the Soviet Union had agreed to divide the country, with the border at the 38th Parallel.
Invasion by the North
After the war tensions rose between the western capitalist, democratic nations with the Communist powers, China and the Soviet Union. US forces had occupied South Korea, which was developing into a democratic, capitalist nation. North Korea had adopted the Communist, authoritarian model of its larger mentors. In an attempt to conquer the south and bring it into the Communist fold, 75,000 North Korean forces invaded the South on June 25, 1950. The United Nations called for a cease-fire, which the North Koreans ignored. Chinese and Soviet Union supported the North Korean drive to unite the country and almost succeeded. United States forces, already in the country, responded. The fighting continued until the two countries signed an armistice on July 27, 1953. The nations have maintained a tense relationship in the years since, with US Forces still maintaining a strong presence along the border.
United States Deaths Korean War
The United State suffered 33,686 combat casualties doing the three-year war. The United States had provided about 88% of the UN forces that resisted the invasion.
For more information about Korean War veterans and memorials, contact:

Korean War Veteran's Association
KWVA, PO Box 407
Charleston, IL  61920-0407

Saturday, October 1, 2016

A Day in Indiana History - October

A Day in Indiana History - October
A Day in Indiana History - October
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Learn about Indiana history a day at a time. Ideal for history lovers, Day in Indiana History – October teaches the historical facts about Indiana in an easy to understand format.

This volume includes the following articles:

October 01, 1843 - Indiana School for the Deaf Opened

October 7, 1850 - The Second Constitutional Convention Convenes in Indianapolis

October 08, 1821 - First Lots Offered for Sale - Indianapolis

October 14, 1910, - October 14, 1910 - John Wooden Born

October, 28 1702 - Trading Post At Vincennes Established

The Indiana Bicentennial History Series will present the history of Indiana in a series of short articles that describe important facts and events in the history of the State of Indiana on a day-to-day format. The series presents those that wish to home school students about the history of the State of Indiana an ideal history book to do just that.

Available On:
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© Mossy Feet Books 2016