Saturday, July 30, 2016

July 30, 1945 - Sinking of the USS Indianapolis

A Day in Indiana History - July
July 30, 1945 - Sinking of the USS Indianapolis
The Memorial pays tribute to the last US Navy ship to sink in World War II. The USS Indianapolis had delivered the components to the first operational atomic bomb to the island of Tinian on July 26. After delivery, Captain McVay requested further orders from the naval headquarters at Guam.  Headquarters ordered McVay to join the USS Idaho in the Leyte Gulf. The Navy was assembling a fleet to invade Japan.
Sub Infested Waters
The USS Indianapolis' orders directed the ship to proceed without an escort, an unprecedented event during the war. Unknown to McVay, two Japanese submarines lay in his path. As the ship proceeded through the sea, one of the submarines sighted the unescorted, defenseless ship and fired two torpedoes. The first torpedo struck the bow of the ship, obliterating it. The second struck the hull near a fuel tank and powder magazine. The ship sank quickly. About 900 of the 1116 crewmen made it into the water. The radioman sent three distress calls before sinking. However, no one reacted. One receiving station commander had gotten drunk and was inebriated, so did not answer the call. Another had ordered his radio operator not to disturb him. The third suspected a Japanese trap and sent no help.
Shark Infested Waters
The men remained in the water for almost five days, held aloft by their life vests. Sharks found the helpless survivors and began to feed. The horror lasted until a PV-1 Ventura Bomber on submarine patrol discovered the flotsam from the wreckage and survivors still clinging to life in the water. He radioed for help. A PBY seaplane was dispatched to aid the stricken survivors. Lieutenant R. Adrian Marks first over flew the target and alerted the USS Cecil Doyle, who whose captain overlooked his orders and sailed to the scene. meanwhile, Marks arrived and started deploying life rafts. He could see that sharks were devouring many of the men and, against Navy procedure, landed his plane and taxied about the water's surface trying to pull as many as he could from the waters. He soon filled the plane and tied many others to the wings. Marks managed to save fifty-six of the men. The Doyle arrived at dark, and, seeing the PBY, stopped his ship to avoid harming any survivors. he pulled Mark's survivors onto the ship. Knowing more ships were on the way, the captain of the Doyle shone his beacon light into the night sky, knowing this would alert any Japanese in the area to his presence. Only 317 men would survive the horror of hunger, thirst, shark attacks and exposure to the elements. It would go down as one of the greatest Navy disasters.
USS Indianapolis Memorial
Walnut St. & Senate Ave., Central Canal
Indianapolis, IN 46202
317-232-7615
Excerpted from the author’s book:



Friday, July 29, 2016

July 29, 1805 - First Meeting of the Indiana Territorial Assembly - Red House - Vincennes

Red House - Vincennes
Red House - Vincennes
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - Southwest Edition


July 29, 1805 - First Meeting of the Indiana Territorial Assembly - Red House - Vincennes
The first meeting of the Indiana Territorial Assembly in the Red House at Vincennes took place on July 29, 1805 during what historians call the second stage of Territorial government. The session would last until August 19. This ended the first stage of Territorial government.
First Stage Of Territorial Government
The first stage of territorial government lasted from the inception of the Indiana Territory on May 07, 1800 until July 29, 1805. During the first stage territorial government consisted of Governor Harrison and three Presidentially appointed judges. Historians are not certain where this assemblage met, but the main conjecture centers around the home of Francis Vigo. The population of the Northwest Territory at this time would have been around 12,000.
Second Stage Of Territorial Government
During the second stage the new General Assembly consisted of two houses, a seven to nine member House of Representives and a five member Legislative Council. The United States President appointed the members of the Legislative Council until 1809, when it became an elected body. The adult free white male inhabitants of the legislature elected the House of Representatives. The Assembly would use the Red House until December 19, 1811. The Assembly would meet sporadically after that at different locations. The last meeting in Vincennes, before the move to Corydon, on March 12, 1813 at Mark Barnett's tavern.

Conner Prairie

Enjoy the pioneer experience at Conner Prairie, the regions largest attraction. Live demonstrations and events allow visitors to participate in many chores and crafts the pioneers needed to survive.
13400 Allisonville Road

Fishers, IN 46038

Indiana Photo of the Day - Lake Lincoln From Mr Lincoln’S Neighborhood Walk, - Lincoln State Park

Indiana Photo of the Day - Lake Lincoln From Mr Lincoln’S Neighborhood Walk, - Lincoln State Park
Indiana Photo of the Day - Lake Lincoln From Mr Lincoln’S Neighborhood Walk, - Lincoln State Park

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
 Southwest Edition
Art PrintsDubbed Mr Lincoln’S Neighborhood Walk, the pleasant trail takes the hiker through areas that the young Abraham Lincoln frequented while a young boy. It passes the Little Pigeon Church, which the Lincolns attended, Lincoln's sister Sarah's grave and the Gordon mill, where Abraham took grain for milling.

Thursday, July 28, 2016

Garfield Park Conservatory and Botanical Garden - Indianapolis Indiana

Garfield Park Conservatory and Botanical Garden - Indianapolis Indiana
Garfield Park Conservatory and Botanical Garden
Garfield Park Conservatory and Botanical Garden



The 136-acre Garfield Park Conservatory and Botanical Garden is the oldest of the Indianapolis city parks. Designed by German landscape architect George Edward Kessler, the sunken garden opened on October 29, 1916.


History of Garfield Park Conservatory and Botanical Garden
Garfield Park Conservatory
Garfield Park Conservatory
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
Central Edition
Southern Riding Park

Garfield Park sprang from two unsuccessful attempts to operate a racetrack and fairgrounds from an area known as Bradley Woods. The Jeffersonville Railroad owned the area and sold it to a group in 1888 that opened the Southern Riding Park. This venture failed, and Marion County Sheriff N. R. Rucker. He later sold the property to the City of Indianapolis. The city leased to a group called the Indiana Trotting Association. Their venture failed also, due to the area's remoteness from the city. The city transformed the land into a park, calling it Southern Park in 1876. The city renamed the park Garfield Park in 1881, in honor of the recently assassinated President James A. Garfield. The city extended the streetcar line to the park in 1895. Numerous improvements took place at the park until Indianapolis hired German landscape architect George Edward Kessler to design a new park
.



George Edward Kessler (July 16, 1862 – March 20, 1923)
The son of Edward Carl Kessler and Adolphe Clotilde Zeitsche Kessler, George was a native of Frankenhausen, Germany. The family immigrated to the United States in 1865. The family lived in several states before settling in Dallas, Texas. Edward died when George was sixteen. His mother, in consultation with relatives, decided that George would work in landscape architecture. She took him back to Germany to study at the Grand Ducal Gardens in Weimar, Germany. Kessler studied there and at various other places in Europe before returning to the United States in 1881. He obtained his first design job in Johnson County, Kansas designing Merriam Park. During his lifetime, he completed over 200 projects and prepared plans for 26 communities. He designed twenty-six park and boulevard systems, 49 parks, 46 estates and residences, and 26 schools. Kessler did several projects for Indianapolis including a park and boulevard system in 1909. Indianapolis has named Kessler Boulevard in his honor.

This article excerpted from the author's book:
Conservatory
Garfield Park Waterfall
Garfield Park Waterfall

Kessler spent the next several years designing and building the park. Construction of the first conservatory completed in 1915. This conservatory lasted until 1954.  The Park constructed the current structure to replace it. This 10,000 square foot conservator was the first to use welded aluminum and glass construction in the United States. It houses a luxuriant tropical habitat featuring tree frogs, koi, free flying birds and a fifteen-foot waterfall. Visitors will also find cacao plants, banana trees, fig trees, and an extensive orchid collection. Plant lovers will find a host of other plantings that can turn a cold winter day into a tropical vacation. The conservatory staff hosts changing educational displays as well as three floral displays each year.
Garfield Park Sunken Gardens
Garfield Park Sunken Gardens
Garfield Park Sunken Gardens
The Sunken Gardens include a three-acre formal classical European garden. The brick walkways, fountains, and extensive plantings provide a restful place to walk in a serene setting. Visitors may enjoy three main floral displays in the Garfield Park botanical garden. The spring tulip display peaks about mid-April. The summer annual flower display is usually best from June through August. September and October is when the fall mum display takes place.
Picnic Areas - Pagoda
Garfield Park has ample places to picnic with tables and shelters scattered throughout the park. Visitors will also find playgrounds for children to play and plenty of walking paths.
Garfield Park Sunken Gardens Fountains
Garfield Park Sunken Gardens Fountains

Garfield Park Arts Center
The Arts Center utilizes arts spaces, visual arts galleries, classrooms and a literary arts library to provide city residents with a diverse artistic and cultural experience. The galleries are open to the public and are free to view.
2432 Conservatory Drive
(317) 327-7135
Memorials, Events, Field Trips and Tours
In addition to the numerous memorials, trails and sports facilities, visitors will find numerous events, field trips and tours hosted by park staff. For more information, contact:
2505 Conservatory Dr.
Indianapolis, IN 46203
(317) 327-7183
Visitors will find numerous events and concerts hosted at the MacAllister Center for the Performing Arts. For information, contact:
2432 Conservatory Drive
Indianapolis, IN 46203


© 2016


This Day in Indiana History - July 28, 1969 - The Auburn Automobile Heritage Corporation was formed

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
 North East Edition
July 28, 1969 - The Auburn Automobile Heritage Corporation was formed
The Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum grew out of the Auburn's owners’ formation of a club in 1952. The club, Auburn Cord Duesenberg Club, staged an Auburn owner reunion that grew over the years to become an event called the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Festival in 1969. This event led to the formation of the Auburn Automobile Heritage Corporation in 1969. The corporation purchased the old manufacturing plant of the Auburn Automobile Company. The museum opened on July 6, 1974.
Auburn Automobile Company
The Auburn Automobile Company rose out of the Eckhart Carriage Company, founded by Charles Eckhart in 1874.
Charles Eckhart (February 24, 1841 - Sep. 30, 1915)
The son of John and Catherine (Fraley) Eckhart, Charles was a native of Germantown, Pennsylvania. the family moved to Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1856 where he worked in a woolen mill. In 1861, he enlisted in the Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry and served in the Civil War. A disability from the war caused his discharge on May 20, 1863. After migrating to Indiana, where he met his future wife, he reenlisted and served guard duty until his discharge in November 1865. He gained employment at Studebaker in Elkhart. By 1874, he moved to Auburn and started the Eckhart Carriage Company. His two sons, Morris and Frank, took over the carriage business in 1893.
Experimenting with Automobiles
Like many carriage makers of that age, the Eckhart brothers began experimenting with the newly developed automobile in 1900, building their first one that year. The brothers experimented with different models over the years The company saw modest success until World War I, when material shortages slowed production. A postwar recession further eroded sales until Erret Lobbing Cord purchased the company in 1926. The expensive automobiles that Cord produced did not sell well, a situation complicated by the Great Depression. The company ceased operation in 1937.
The Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum in Auburn preserves the heritage and history of the Auburn Cord automobile. For more information, contact:
Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum
1600 S Wayne St
Auburn, Indiana
(260) 925-1444
info@automobilemuseum.org

Spirit Of Jasper Train Excursions

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
Southwest Edition
Spirit Of Jasper Train Excursions
Passengers ride in restored passenger cars with a choice of several different excursions. Choose from Ride and Dine, French Lick or a Fall Foliage Ride & Dine train ride. For more information, schedules and menus, contact:
Spirit Of Jasper Train Excursions
201 Mill Street
Jasper, IN 47546
812-482-5959

Indiana Photo of the Day - Gristmill at Spring Mill State Park

Indiana Photo of the Day - Gristmill at Spring Mill State Park
Indiana Photo of the Day - Gristmill at Spring Mill State Park

Sell Art Online
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South Central Edition
Spring Mill State Park near Mitchell, Indiana, is one of Indiana's premier State Parks. The Spring Mill In at the park is an excellent place to spend a few days relaxing and enjoying the Park's amenities. These include some Inn, wonderful hiking, the Gus Grissom Memorial and Pioneer Village. There are also several small caves and one boat cave tour.

Indiana Photo of the Day - Gristmill at Spring Mill State Park

Indiana Photo of the Day - Gristmill at Spring Mill State Park
Indiana Photo of the Day - Gristmill at Spring Mill State Park

Sell Art Online
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South Central Edition
Spring Mill State Park near Mitchell, Indiana, is one of Indiana's premier State Parks. The Spring Mill In at the park is an excellent place to spend a few days relaxing and enjoying the Park's amenities. These include some Inn, wonderful hiking, the Gus Grissom Memorial and Pioneer Village. There are also several small caves and one boat cave tour.

Wednesday, July 27, 2016

This Day in Indiana History - July 27, 1905 - Reid Hospital - Richmond Dedicated

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - East Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
East Central Edition
July 27, 1905 - Reid Hospital - Richmond Dedicated
In the early Twentieth Century, Richmond Indiana had one hospital, St. Stephen’s Hospital. This community had outgrown St. Stephen's ability to serve the community properly. The hospital had only ten beds and had to turn away dozens of patients each week. Native son, Daniel G. Reid, stepped in and financed a new hospital for Richmond.
Daniel G. Reid (August 1, 1858 – January 17, 1925)
The son of Daniel and Anna Dougan Reid, Daniel was native to Richmond, Indiana. After completing his education in the Richmond public schools, he worked as a messenger for the Second National Bank in Richmond. He soon rose to the position of teller, a post he held until 1895. He and another Richmond native, William B. Leeds, purchased the American Tin Plate Company in Elwood, Indiana. The men grew the company, acquiring more companies until he had combined all the tin plate companies in the country into his company. In 1902, J. P. Morgan purchased his company, combined it with U. S. Steel and made Reid the president. Morgan reportedly paid 18 million dollars for the American Tin Plate Company.

Indiana State Historic Site - Culbertson Mansion

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South Central Edition

Title of Marker:
Culbertson Mansion
Location:
1996 Indiana Historical Bureau and Friends of Culbertson Mansion.
914 E. Main Street, New Albany. (Floyd County, Indiana)
Installed by:
1996 Indiana Historical Bureau and Friends of Culbertson Mansion.
Marker ID #:
22.1996.2
Marker Text:
French Second Empire Style structure. Construction began 1867 for William Stewart Culbertson (1814-1892), leading industrialist, financier, and philanthropist in New Albany area. Listed in National Register of Historic Places, 1974; accepted as state-owned historic site, 1976; part of Mansion Row Historic District, 1983.

Brief History
William Stewart Culbertson (1814-1892)
Son of William Culbertson and Julia Stuart, William S. is the second of six children. His father dies when William is ten years old, so William began working as a dry goods clerk to help his mother make ends meet. At age twenty-one, he moved to Louisville, Kentucky and applied to a dry goods merchant for work. The merchant encourages him to seek employment across the river in New Albany, so William crossed the Ohio River and applied for work with General Alexander S Burnett, who owned the largest dry goods store in New Albany.
Marriage and On His Own
In 1840, he married Eliza Vance of Corydon, with whom he will have eight children. Later that year he formed a business partnership with his brother John. They called their business Culbertson & Brother and located it at Pearl & Main Street in New Albany. Together they grew the business, which was a retail/wholesale dry goods establishment, and it became successful.
The Civil War
During the war, Culbertson supported the Union cause by organizing a home guard to defend New Albany and raised money for the Union. A series of successful business deals spurred by the wartime economy made him a fortune. By the time the war ended, Culbertson had expanded into the banking industry.
After the War
Culbertson became active in many business ventures after the war, including transportation industry, glass and sheet metal. He used his money and influence to fund several charitable local causes including the Culbertson Widows' Home. In 1867, he built the mansion that served as his home from 1867 until his death in 1892. At his death, he was the richest man in Indiana, with a fortune of 3.5 million dollars. This is equivalent to about 61 million current dollars.
Culbertson Mansion
The 20,000 square foot mansion has 28 rooms. It features hand-painted ceilings, a carved rosewood staircase, marble fireplaces, and crystal chandeliers. The State of Indiana acquired the property in 1964 and declared it a State Historic Site in 1976. The State began renovations in 1980. The home had become neglected and needed extensive work to restore it to its original luster. It is now a State Historic Site, open for the public to enjoy. Individuals or companies may rent the parlor for parties, receptions or other events. The property is open to the public on Saturday and Sunday. During the week, it is available only for private tours.
914 East Main St.
New Albany, IN 47150

Phone: 812-944-9600

7/27/2016 - Indiana Photo of the Day - Newly Planted Corn Fields - Michigan Road, Napoleon Indiana

Indiana Photo of the Day - Newly Planted Corn Fields - Michigan Road, Napoleon Indiana
Indiana Photo of the Day - Newly Planted Corn Fields - Michigan Road, Napoleon Indiana
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums -
South East Edition
Photography PrintsMichigan Road
Michigan Road is one of the oldest roads in Indiana, built in the early 1800's to connect Madison, Indiana with Michigan City. When the Indiana State Government moved from Corydon, Indiana to Indianapolis, the legislators and governor found themselves in isolation. There were no good roads leading to the new capital city and the White River was not navigable. They sought to rectify this by passing legislation to build the first "superhighway" in the State of Indiana. To accomplish their goal, they needed to negotiate a treaty with the Pottawattamie Indian Tribe and clear a vast swath of trees the length of the state.
Excerpted from the author's book:
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition

Tuesday, July 26, 2016

Day in Indiana History - July 26, 1788 First Use of the Official Northwest Territory Seal

Official Northwest Territory Seal
Official Northwest Territory Seal

A Day in Indiana History - July
A Day in Indiana History - July
July 26, 1788 First Use of the Official Northwest Territory Seal
The first know use of the Seal of the Northwest Territory was on a proclamation that Governor Arthur St. Clair issued on July 26, 1788. The seal includes a coiled snake, a felled tree, boats on the river and a heavily laden apple tree.
A Latin inscription reads, with the translation below:
“‘Meliorem lapsa locavit!’
“He has planted a better than the fallen.”
The outter inscription on the seal is:
"The Seal Of The Territoryn Of Of The Us Northwest Of The River Ohio"

Indiana Photo of the Day - Forest Marsh At Dune State Park


Indiana Photo of the Day - Forest Marsh At Dune State Park
Indiana Photo of the Day - Forest Marsh At Dune State Park

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums North West Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
North West Edition


Sell Art OnlineTrail 2 at Dune State Park crosses through a marshy climax forest as it skirts the dunes of Lake Michigan.
Indiana Dunes State Park
1600 North 25 East
Chesterton, IN 46304-1142
 (219) 926-1952


Monday, July 25, 2016

La Porte County Museum - La Porte, Indiana


Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums North West Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
North West Edition
La Porte County Museum
In addition to exhibiting artifacts, documents and phographs about La Porte County, the Museum hosts a number of special events throughout the year.
La Porte County Museum 
2405 Indiana Ave., Suite 1
La Porte, IN 46350
219-324-6767
info@laportecountyhistory.org

Friday, July 15, 2016

Rural Routes to Main Street Artisan Trail

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
 Markers & Museums -
Central Edition


Rural Routes to Main Street Artisan Trail
Hendricks, Morgan Counties
Brownsburg, Clayton, Danville, Martinsville, Mooresville, North Salem, Pittsboro and Plainfield
The Rural Routes to Main Street Artisan Trail links thirty unique businesses that include wineries, orchards, artist galleries, farms, beekeepers, eateries and many shops featuring locally made items from area artisans. Download a guide and get more information from the web site or contacting the visitor centers for the counties involved. The venue changes annually, so make sure you get a current version.
Rural Routes to Main Street Artisan Trail

Hall Of Heroes - Elkhart, Indiana

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums North Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
North Central Edition
Hall Of Heroes
Hall Of Heroes Comic And Superhero Museum possesses the world's largest collection of comic books (55,000+), super hero memorabilia, original art and props.
Hall Of Heroes Comic And Superhero Museum
58055 CR 105
Elkhart, IN
(574) 293-0755

Indiana Photo of the Day - North Lookout Tower - Brown County State Park - Nashville, IN

North Lookout Tower - Brown County State Park - Nashville, IN
North Lookout Tower - Brown County State Park - Nashville, IN
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South Central Edition
The North Lookout Tower at Brown County State Park provides a stunning view of the surrounding southern Indiana Knobs terrain.

Thursday, July 14, 2016

Video - A Visit to Harmonie State Park, Indiana





Rivers and Roads Artisan Trail

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - West Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums -
West Central Edition
Rivers and Roads Artisan Trail
The Rivers and Roads Artisan Trail features Indiana artisans in a six county area that produce the highest quality work. The six counties include Clay, Parke, Putnam, Sullivan, Vermilion, and Vigo counties in west central Indiana. The trail is flexible, with vistitors able to design their own trip that suits their own tastes from the web site. The Trip Planner on the web site contains two sample tours, the Terre Haute Tour and the Covered Bridge Tour, to help tourists get started. The Trail features 249 artisans ranging from artists, potters, ceramics and food artists. For more information and to plan your trip, contact:
Rural Urban Entrepreneurship Development Institute (RUEDI)
Business Engagement Center at Indiana State University
John T. Myers Technology Building
650 Cherry Street, Room 003
Terre Haute, IN 47809
812/237-2536
© Paul Wonning 2016

Swiss Heritage Village and Museum

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - North East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
North East Edition
Amish in Indiana
Brothers Christian and Peter Baumgartner migrated from Wayne County, Ohio to Adams County, Indiana, arriving on August 16, 1838. The Amish community prospered and grew, thriving today across many counties in northern Indiana.
Swiss Heritage Village and Museum
The twenty-six acre village is the largest outdoor museum in northern Indiana. The museum seeks to preserve and interpret Mennonite culture in northern Indiana.
Swiss Heritage Village and Museum
1200 Swiss Way Box 88
Berne, IN
(260) 589-8007

Wednesday, July 13, 2016

Rotary Jail Museum

Montgomery County Rotary Jail
The Rotary County Jail was built in 1882 on a new design that promised to house prisoners safely and efficiently. The wedge shaped cells surrounded a circular shaft, sort of like a horizontal hamster wheel. The jailer turned a crank that would spin the cellblock around to an opening, allowing one prisoner at a time to leave the cell. The sheriff used the main and second story floors as their residence. The county made modifications to the building to try to meet changing prisoner standards. In 1932, the county immobilized the turntable. Finally, in 1972 they abandoned the jail in favor of a new one. The Montgomery County Cultural Foundation has restored the structure and now operates it as a museum. Out of eighteen similar jails built in the United States this is the only one that still functions. For more tours and more information, contact:
Rotary Jail Museum
225 N. Washington St.
Crawfordsville, IN 47933

Tannenbaum Cultural Center
107 W. Spring St.
Crawfordsville, IN 47933
(located directly behind the Rotary Jail Museum)
Mailing address for both:
Montgomery County Cultural Foundation
P.O. Box 771
Crawfordsville, IN 47933