Monday, May 30, 2016

Indiana Photo of the Day - Brown County State Park Vista, Nashville, IN

Indiana Photo of the Day - Brown County State Park Vista, Nashville, IN

Brown County State Park
Because of the park's resemblance to the Smoky Mountains, the area has earned the nickname "Little Smokies." Brown County State Park features several scenic vista lookouts. Overnight guests may stay at the campground, the Inn or in a cabin. Visitors will find many wonderful picnic areas.
For more information about Brown County State Park, see the author’s book:
A Visit to Brown County State Park

Brown County State Park
P.O. Box 608
Nashville, IN 47448
(812) 988-6406

Friday, May 27, 2016

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - West Central Edition

Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - West Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - West Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
West Central Edition

Take a fun road trip through the rich history of Indiana using Exploring Indiana’s Historic Sites, Markers & Museums West Central Edition as your guidebook. Celebrate the Indiana Bi-Centennial by traveling the roads and towns in West Central Indiana. Visit the places and learn the stories of Indiana’s rich history.
From the rugged beauty of Turkey Run and Shades State Park to the historic Mansfield and Bridgeton Mills, visitors to west central Indiana will find a multitude of historical and natural wonders. The largest, by volume, waterfall is located in this region as well as dozens of charming covered bridges in Parke County and other nearby communities. The westernmost naval battle of the Revolutionary War took place on the Wabash River in Sullivan County and at Terre Haute an imaginative glassmaker designed the classic Coca-Cola bottle. Terre Haute is also home to Fowler Park, a pioneer village that visitors can watch volunteers enact life as it was in frontier times on specified weekends. Exploring Indiana’s Historic Sites, Markers & Museums West Central Edition is the guide you need to explore Indiana’s historic treasures.

Available On:
Kindle
Kindle Softbound
Smashwords
Smashwords 20% Free Sample
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble - Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Apple
Create Space - Softcover Book
Paul Wonning's Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Smashwords Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Apple
Paul Wonning's Books on Kobo
Paul Wonning's Books on Barnes and Noble


© Mossy Feet Books 2016

Thursday, May 26, 2016

A Visit to Versailles, Friendship and Holton, Indiana

A Visit to Versailles, Friendship and Holton, Indiana



Kindle
Omlit
Barnes & Noble
Kobo
Google Play
Smashwords
Apple Smashwords
Create Space - Softcover Book

Continue

Nestled in the hills of southeastern Indiana, Versailles, Friendship and Holton beckon the traveler with dining, recreation and relaxation. Southern Indiana abounds with small town charm. Those that travel in the state are never disappointed with the friendliness of the people and the quality of life. A Visit to Versailles, Indiana contains loads of information and photos about Versailles, Indiana.



© Mossy Feet Books 2013


© Mossy Feet Books 2013

A Visit to Ripley County, Indiana



A Visit to Ripley County, Indiana
A Visit to Ripley County, Indiana

This is the complete visitors travel guide to Ripley County, Indiana.
Find out where to eat, dine or recreate in southeastern Indiana. A Visit to Ripley County Indiana contains the travel guides for Batesville, Sunman, Osgood, Napoleon, Versailles, Milan and Friendship Indiana. There are five drive tours included which will take you to all the sights and historical significant places in Ripley County, Indiana, USA.




Kindle
Smashwords
Barnes & Noble
Kobo
Apple
 © Mossy Feet Books 2013

A Visit To Sunman and Milan, Indiana

A Visit To Sunman and Milan, Indiana





A Visit To Sunman and Milan, Indiana
A Visit To Sunman and Milan, Indiana

Nestled in the hills of southeastern Indiana, Sunman and Milan beckon the traveler with dining, recreation and relaxation.
Southern Indiana abounds with small town charm. Those that travel in the state are never disappointed with the friendliness of the people and the quality of life.

A Visit to Sunman and Milan Indiana contains loads of information and photos about small town Indiana.





Kindle
Smashwords
Barnes & Noble
Kobo
Apple
Google Play


© Mossy Feet Books 2016


A Visit to Osgood and Napoleon, Indiana

A Visit to Osgood and Napoleon, Indiana



A Visit to Osgood and Napoleon, Indiana
A Visit to Osgood and Napoleon, Indiana
This guide for Osgood and Napoleon Indiana includes accomodations, shopping, entertainment and dining options available for these two Indiana towns. A twenty five mile driving tour through northwestern Ripley County is included in the booklet which leads past Underground Railroad and Civil War points of interest.

Ripley County was a hotbed for the Underground Railroad movement during the period before the Civil War and was also visited by Morgan's Raiders as they crossed Indiana.












Available On:
Kindle
Smashwords
Barnes & Noble
Kobo
Apple Google Play


© Mossy Feet Books 2013

Indiana Photo of the Day - Model T Ford Museum - Richmond, Indiana

Visitors can enjoy the world's largest Model T club with models on display. The museum includes unique shops, stunning murals, fun and fabulous restaurants, a chocolate shop and a microbrewery. The museum is small, but well worth the visit.
Model T Ford Museum
309 N. 8th Street
Richmond, IN 47374
(765) 488-0026

Wednesday, May 25, 2016

Indiana Photo of the Day - Garfield Park Conservatory and Botanical Garden - Indianapolis Indiana

Garfield Park Conservatory and Botanical Garden - Indianapolis Indiana
Garfield Park Conservatory and Botanical Garden - Indianapolis Indiana 
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
 Central Edition

Garfield Park Conservatory and Botanical Garden - Indianapolis Indiana 

Garfield Park Hours
Sunken Garden
April - October - 10:00 AM - 10:00 PM
October 16 - April 15 - 10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Conservatory
Monday - Saturday - 10:00 - 5:00
Sunday - 1:00 - 5:00

136 Acres
Garfield Park includes a three-acre formal classical European garden. The brick walkways, fountains, and extensive plantings provide a restful place to walk in a serene setting. Designed by German landscape architect George Edward Kessler, the garden opened on October 29, 1916.
© 2016 Paul Wonning

Monday, May 23, 2016

Indiana Photo of the Day - Indiana World War Memorial

Indiana World War Memorial
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - Central Edition
Markers & Museums
Central Edition

Indiana World War Memorial
The 210 foot tall, 30,000 square foot memorial and museum dominates downtown Indianapolis. The American Legion maintains its national headquarters on the plaza.  The Indiana war Memorial Museum is also located here.  You may walk the impressive grounds viewing the many memorials to our State for heroes.  Then you may enter the Museum that honors Indiana's involvement in our rations wars.  This impressive Museum has exhibits depicting Indiana's role in our nation's wars from the Revolutionary war to the current conflicts.  There are literally hundreds of artifacts, weapons, documents, battle flags, and other paraphernalia in the museum.
Indiana World War Memorial
431 N. Meridian St.
Indianapolis, IN 46204
317-232-7615

Friday, May 20, 2016

Indiana Photo of the Day - Summit Lake State Park

This 2,680 Indiana State Park includes 800-acre Summit Lake. Visitors can enjoy hiking, swimming, camping, wildlife viewing and boating.
  Amenities
Picnic areas w/shelters
Interpretive Naturalist Services (Seasonal)
Three Boat Launch Ramps
Boat Motor / Idle speed only
Cross County Skiing / No Ski Rental
Fishing / Ice Fishing
Hiking Trails
Rental-Canoe, Paddleboat, Rowboat
Swimming / Beach
1. Prairie Trail-Moderate (2 Miles)
2. Campground-Moderate (1.25 Miles)
3. Beach Trail- Accessible (.9 Mile)
4. Self-Guided Nature Trail-Moderate (.75 Mile)
Summit Lake
5993 N. Messick Road
New Castle, IN 47362
(765) 766-5873

Thursday, May 19, 2016

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - Central Edition




Take a fun road trip through the rich history of Indiana using Exploring Indiana’s Historic Sites, Markers & Museums Central Edition as your guidebook. Celebrate the Indiana Bi-Centennial by traveling the roads and towns in Central Indiana. Visit the places and learn the stories of Indiana’s rich history.

Visitors to central Indiana will find dozens of amazing historic sites to see. Indianapolis forms the focal point with many fabulous museums like the Indiana State Museum, the Medal of Honor Memorial and the Children’s Museum. Other sites in the area include Conner Prairie in Fishers, the Museum of Miniature Houses in Carmel and take a train ride at the Indiana Transportation Museum in Noblesville. Visitors can learn the historic stories of these sites and many more using the Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums – Central Edition as a guide.

Available On:
Kindle
Amazon Softbound
Smashwords
Smashwords 20% Free Sample
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble - Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Apple
Create Space - Softcover Book
Paul Wonning's Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Smashwords Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Apple
Paul Wonning's Books on Kobo
Paul Wonning's Books on Barnes and Noble





Indiana Photo of the Day - Grandview, Indiana

Grandview Indiana - Sandy Creek Landing
Grandview Indiana - Sandy Creek Landing

Grandview
County - Spencer
Area - 0.96 sq mi
Elevation - 394 ft
Population (2010) - 749
ZIP code - 47615
Area code - 812
Platted in 1851, the town derived its name from its "Grand View" of the Ohio River. The creek that skirts the eastern boundary of the town, visible from a riverfront park in Indiana State Road 66, is called Sandy Creek. Visitors will find two historical markers in the park, Sandy Creek Landing and Thomas Lincoln.
Sandy Creek Landing
According to the Sandy Creek Marker, early settlers called the area near the creek Sandy Creek Landing. This area was across the Ohio River from Blackford Creek, Kentucky the site of Fort Blackford. Here an Amerindian trail known as Warrior Trail connected Hardinsburg Kentucky in the east to Owensboro, Kentucky on the Ohio River.  Fort Blackford was about halfway along this forty-five mile trail. Settlers would camp around Fort Blackford as they waited for William Henry Harrison to conclude the Treaty of Grouseland in 1805. When the treaty became official, settlers poured across into the newly opened lands. The land office to purchase lands was a three-day ride west to Vincennes. Most of the new settlers erected temporary cabins near here to settle in until they had their lands purchased. Then they would move on.
Thomas Lincoln Family
According to the second marker, Sandy Creek Landing is where the Thomas Lincoln family crossed the Ohio from Kentucky in 1816, the same year Indiana became a state.
The small park here, on the Ohio River Scenic Byway, truly affords a "Grand View" of the Ohio River, especially at sunset.

© Indiana Places 2016

Tuesday, May 17, 2016

Wesley Chapel Gulf And Orangeville Rise of the Lost River

Wesley Chapel Gulf  And Orangeville Rise of the Lost River
Wesley Chapel Gulf  - Lost River
Wesley Chapel Gulf  - Lost River

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
 Markers & Museums -
South Central Edition
The Lost River in Orange County constitutes one of Indiana's most unusual geologic features. The river dives underground, pursuing its course through a subterranean system of channels as it courses its way to its rendezvous with the East Fork of the White River south of Shoals, Indiana
The Lost River
Length - About 87 Miles
The Lost River is a large sinkhole and subterranean stream, and an intricate cave system.  There are two forks of the Lost River. The North Fork begins southwest of the intersection of North Smedley Road and West Ben Walton Road. The South Fork of the Lost River begins about 1.5 miles south just west of North Smedley Road in Washington County. The North and South Forks of the Lost River meet about three miles west of their sources. The junction is somewhat less than a mile east of Claysville, IN, just south of Lost River Road in Washington County. On its way, west the Lost River crosses Washington, Orange and Martin Counties. For about 23 miles of this length, mostly in Orange County, the Lost River flows underground, hence its name. Many of the features are on county roads that are not hard to find. The uniqueness of the Lost River makes is worthwhile to find them. The main features include the Wesley Chapel Gulf and the Orangeville Rise.
Wesley Chapel Gulf
Wesley Chapel Gulf  - Lost River

Wesley Chapel Gulf is a 187-acre tract of land located on the Hoosier National Forest in western Orange County, Indiana. It is named for the Wesley Chapel Church, located just to the north. Visitors will find Wesley Chapel Gulf about four miles southwest of Orleans and two miles east of Orangeville. To find, drive south from Orleans on Indiana State Road 37 to County Road 490 N, about 2.4 miles. A sign pointing towards Orangeville marks the road. Drive west on CR 490 (CR 500 at some point) for about 3.6 miles, reaching County Road 350 W. The Wesley Chapel Church marks the intersection.  The church was built in 1858, originally known as Bruner's Chapel, and has an associated cemetery. The Gulf derives its name from the church. Turn left (south). The parking lot for the Wesley Chapel Gulf is about one half mile south of the church. A Hoosier National Forest sign indicates the correct spot to park. A short hiking trail leads to the Wesley Chapel Rise.
Wesley Chapel Gulf received designation as a National Natural Landmark in 1972 due to its impressive geologic features. The gulf provides a rare glimpse of the Lost River on its subterranean path. Several other karst features are represented in the immediate area of the Gulf including swallow holes, sinkholes, and caves. The Forest Service recognized the uniqueness of Wesley Chapel Gulf and acquired the property in 1996 through a land exchange with U.S. Gypsum Co. The best time to visit Wesley Chapel Gulf is in the fall after the foliage has died down, or during the winter months.


Orangeville Rise
Orangeville Rise of the Lost River
Orangeville Rise of the Lost River
From Wesley Chapel Gulf, return to County Road 500 N and turn left (west). County Road 500 N becomes first CR 525 N, then CR 540 N before intersecting County Road 500W. Turn left (south) towards Orangeville. The parking area is on the south side of Orangeville. A short trail leads to the Rise.
Orangeville Rise of the Lost River
Orangeville Rise of the Lost River

At the Orangeville Rise Indiana's second largest spring comes to the surface, forming streams that intersect with the Lost River a short distance away. The Rise is a tributary of the Lost River that rises from a cave into a 220-foot diameter rock-walled pit. The stream formed flows southwest to merge with the Lost River. The 355 square mile watershed of the Lost River covers five counties. This area possesses a large number of underground caves, sinkholes and underground streams.  
The Indiana Karst Conservancy owns the three-acre area.
Tours
Forest service personnel conduct tours from time to time. For information, contact:

Visit French Lick West Baden
8102 West State Road 56
West Baden IN 47469
866.309.9139

Tour on your Own
Visitors may tour on their own at any time. For more information, contact:
Wesley Chapel Gulf
Hoosier National Forest

Indiana Karst Conservancy. 
PO Box 2401,
Indianapolis, IN 46206-2401. 

Division of Nature Preserves. 
402 W. Washington St., Rm. W267.
Indianapolis, IN 46204. 
317-232-0209.


© Indiana Places 2016

Monday, May 16, 2016

Indiana Historical Marker - Clark State Forest

Hilltop Vista - Clark State Forest
Hilltop Vista - Clark State Forest
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
 Markers & Museums
South East Edition
Title of Marker:
Clark State Forest
Location:
On US 31, Clark State Forest, 100 yards past entrance on south side of Forest Road, north of Henryville. (Clark County, Indiana)
Installed by:
1992 Indiana Historical Bureau and Henryville Elementary Little Hoosiers
Marker ID #:
10.1992.1
Marker Text:
Indiana's oldest state forest, established 1903. Portions of Clark's Grant (1781) included in original 2, 000 acres. Experimental plantings and reforestation began 1904; became national models in scientific forestry. Multiple land uses include timber management, recreational activities, wildlife areas, and watershed protection.
Brief History
At the time of settlement, vast forests covered Indiana. These forests spawned many industries dependent on the high quality hardwoods found in these forests. Many furniture makers located in the state and the ship builders along the Ohio River needed the lumber for shipbuilding. In addition, much of the valuable timber was exported. The State appointed Charles Deam to oversee the operation of the Forest.
Deforestation and State Forests
By 1900, many areas had become deforested. concern rose that the valuable industries that created jobs would close due to lack of wood. To deal with the problem, the Indiana General Assembly created the Indiana State Board of Forestry in 1901. In 1903, the State purchased land in Clark County and established Clark State Forest to experiment with forest management practices and grow tree seedlings. The initial purchase of 2023 acres has grown to over 20,000 acres today. Many other State Forests have joined the ranks since them, preserving Indiana's forest heritage.
Charles Deam (August 30, 1865 - May 29, 1953)
Charles Deam entered life on a farm near Bluffton in Wells County, Indiana. His father taught him about plants as he grew up, spurring his lifelong interest in botany. He attended DePauw University, but had to leave after his second year because he could not afford the tuition. He got a job as clerk in a pharmacy where the long hours led to exhaustion and high stress. His doctor recommended long walks in the forest to relieve the stress. On these walks, Deam studied the plants and collected specimens. His interest and collection grew and his collection soared to over 78,000 plants. Indiana University acquired his plant collection and Deam joined the Academy of Sciences in Indiana. Indiana Governor became aware of Deam’s work and appointed him as Indiana's first State Forester in 1909. He moved to Clark State Forest to create an experimental forest laboratory. It was at his insistence that the State add an additional 2000 acres to the park. His work had lasting consequences on forestry in Indiana and visitors can still see many of his experimental plantings. The Charles C. Deam Wilderness and Deam Lake State Recreation Area are named in his honor.
Training Facility During Depression
The Civilian Conservation Corps used Clark State Forest as a training facility during the Great Depression. The CCC built many of the structures in the park as training exercises for the men to learn practices to use in other public lands.
Hilly Terrain
Clark State Forest is very hilly, and the narrow, one lane asphalt system of roads, which wind their way through the Forest, makes a very scenic drive, especially in the autumn when the leaves are turning. There are eight sheltered picnic areas, the nicest ones overlooking Franke Lake. There is Old Franke, probably the best one, and New Franke, on the southwest side of the lake.
Mixed Use Facility
Clark State Forest, like all Indiana State Forests, is a mixed-use facility. Hunting and fishing is permitted on the property. There is a popular gun range near Bowen Lake on the west end of the Forest. The State Of Indiana also sells timber from the Forest. Sales from the State Forest provide funds that help administer the State Forest system.
Facilities At Clark
Clark State Forest still functions as a State Forest. In addition to the forestry functions, it provides a number of recreational opportunities for the public. Fishing, hunting, hiking and camping are all offered here as well as horse trails and an outdoor shooting range.
Clark State Forest is located on US 31 about one mile north of Henryville, Indiana and about ten miles south of Scottsburg, Indiana. This is Indiana’s oldest State Forest, established in 1903. It is also one of the prettiest of the State Forests.
Horse Trails
There are about one hundred miles of horse trails at Clark State Forest, as well as six parking lots for day users. Horse riding among the wooded hills of Clark State Forest is a popular activity and the weekends will find many horse riders on the trails. Camping and Fishing
The Forest boasts a forty-five site primitive campground. There are seven public lakes ranging in size from thirteen acres to two acres. Franke Lake, at thirteen acres, is on the southeast side of Clark, the main road winding past it and its two picnic areas. Fishing is permitted, with an Indiana Fishing License in any of these lakes.
Fantastic Views
This road then climbs a rather impressive hill up to the fire tower. On the left, just before the fire tower is a picnic area with a very impressive view. On a clear day, the skyline of Louisville, Kentucky, twenty miles to the south can be visible against a background of trees and sky. There are two unmarked trails here. One, descending the hill to west of the picnic shelter, is a one-quarter mile loop which affords some nice views in the fall and winter when the leaves are down. Another trail, little used, leads down the hill. A hike on this one is not for the unprepared. It is steep, slippery, and finally dies away in the forest. A return up the hill is then necessary. This is a very pretty trail with some nice views, but it is not for the inexperienced hiker.
Fire Tower
The fire tower is the next item of interest on this road. Ninety eight steps to the top, the tower is about one hundred feet tall. Unlike most fire towers, access to the lookout is permitted. An unfettered look at the surrounding countryside here makes it well worth the climb up. Again, Louisville is visible to the south, as well as some Indiana villages in other directions.
Scenic Loop
You can complete the loop around the Forest by turning right at the satellite dish antennae, right again on Bloomington Trail. This leads back to US 31. Maps are available at the State Forest Office, which is just off US 31, the entrance about a quarter mile north of the entrance to Clark State Forest.
Hiking Trails
There are only two marked hiking trails at Clark State Forest, the .9 White Oak Trail, the trailhead is on the right before the turnoff to Old Franke. The Forest Resource Trail, a one-mile loop, is located near the main entrance. The trail head is near the Pine Lake picnic area.
Clark State Forest features a diversity of activities for the nature lover. Hiking, fishing, picnicking, hunting and horseback riding are all activities that can be pursued here. Add to that a scenic drive that encircles the facility, you have the ingredients for a fun day outdoors.
Clark State Forest
P.O. Box 119
Henryville, IN 47126
(812) 294-4306
© Indiana Places 2016

Friday, May 13, 2016

12 “Honest Abe” Reasons Why Everyone In Indiana Needs To Visit The Land Of Lincoln

Lincoln Plaza - Lincoln State Park
Lincoln Plaza - Lincoln State Park 
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South Central Edition

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South Central Edition
Nestled in southern Indiana’s hills, The Land of Lincoln includes many historical places where Abraham Lincoln, the Sixteenth President of the United States, lived as a boy. Visitors can walk in Lincoln’s footsteps at Lincoln State Park and at the adjacent Lincoln Boyhood National Memorial. Here visitors will find the Boyhood Memorial, the Lincoln Cabin Site Memorial, Nancy Hanks’ Grave, and other Lincoln historical treasures.

Nearby Holiday World and Santa Claus, Indiana are popular attractions that cater to families. St. Meinrad Archabbey is a beautiful spot to visit and tour while driving along the nearby Ohio River Scenic Byway.

These 12 places should be on everyone’s list to see when they visit the Land of Lincoln in Indiana.

For the rest of the article, click this link.

Indiana Photo of the Day - Jackson State Forest - Brownstown, Indiana

Jackson State Forest - Brownstown, Indiana
Jackson State Forest - Brownstown, Indiana
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South Central Edition
Jackson State Forest
Jackson State Forest consists of 15,721 acres of heavily forested, very hilly terrain in the Knobs area of southeastern Indiana. The area abounds in beauty and boasts activities for all kinds of interests. Hikers, photographers, campers, equestrians, and the handicapped can all experience a quality outdoor adventure at Jackson Washington State Forest. This Indiana State Forest is sort of spread out, with facilities in multiple locations.
Hiking
Hiking in Jackson State Forest will satisfy the casual day hiker, or the more serious backpacker. The hiking trails are varied and beautiful. There are seven trails totaling 9.5 miles, ranging from very rugged almost mountain type hiking to wheelchair accessible jaunts through the forest. Jackson-Washington is one of Indiana’s best State Forests.
Fishing
Jackson State Forest has five fishing lakes that include Knob Lake, which has a boat ramp and is seven acres in size. There is a handicap accessible fishing site and picnic area on this lake. Boats with electric motors are allowed on Knob Lake. Spurgeon Hollow Lake consists of twelve acres, has a boat ramp, and boats with electric motors are permitted. Other lakes include:
Potter Lake covers ten acres and is accessible only to hikers
Plattsburg Pond comprises eight acres and is also accessible only to hikers
One acre Cypress Pond is located at the entrance of the park,
Bridle Trails
There are three bridal trails totaling five miles in length with additional horse trails at nearby Skyline Drive.
Archery
Archers will find a 20-target archery range to hone their skills for hunting.
Camping
Jackson State Forest has a peaceful campground to pitch your tent with sixty primitive sites near Knob Lake. Campsite # 11 is a wheelchair accessible site. A picnic table and grill is available on each site. Pit toilets are available. There are no showers in the campground Youth tent camping area is also available. Backcountry camping is available on some trails and on nearby Knobstone Trail.
Picnicking
Jackson-Washington is a picnic paradise. You will find six shelter houses with fireplaces and horseshoe pits and numerous picnic tables scattered around the grounds. The use of all shelters is on a first come, first served basis. A playground for children is located adjacent to the picnic area.
Other Activities
There are a host of other activities for the adventurous. A bird watching area that has numerous feeders is located near the office. Ducks and geese swim on the several lakes. Sports facilities include a volleyball and basketball court and two playgrounds for the children.
Driving
If you are more into driving than hiking, you can drive around Jackson State Forest, and then check out some of the other places of interest. Nearby Skyline Drive offers a unique experience for Hoosiers. Skyline Drive climbs up the towering knobs and offers a commanding view of the surrounding countryside. It is a meandering road with five overlooks, several picnic spots, shelters, and additional day hiking. There are numerous county roads to cruise, including the scenic drive over to nearby Starve Hollow Lake. You can also visit nearby Vallonia Nursery, a state facility with many different types of trees in cultivation.
Getting there is easy. Jackson-Washington is located on State Road 250 about 2 ½ miles south of Brownstown, IN. Brownstown is on US 50 between Seymour and Bedford, Indiana
Additional Information available at:
1278 East State Road 250
Brownstown, IN 47220
812-358-2160
Indiana State Forests 
Camping, hiking, fishing, target shooting and hunting - Jackson Washington State Forest has it all. The steep knobs create a challenging hiking experience that is almost mountain-like in scope. There is also a handicapped access trail that is wheelchair ready. You will also find excellent fishing in any of several lakes. Knob Lake has one handicapped site suitable for a wheelchair access. The campground is wooded and nice and there are designated hunting areas where you just might find that eight-point buck.

Spend a day, or spend a week, you are sure to enjoy your visit.

© Indiana Places 2016

Thursday, May 12, 2016

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - East Central Edition



Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - East Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - East Central Edition


Take a fun road trip through the rich history of Indiana using Exploring Indiana’s Historic Sites, Markers & Museums East Central Edition as your guidebook. Celebrate the Indiana Bi-Centennial by traveling the roads and towns in East Central Indiana. Visit the places and learn the stories of Indiana’s rich history.

Visitors to east central Indiana can visit the birthplace of aviation pioneer Wilbur Wright and marvel at Richmond Indiana’s fabulous Wayne County Historical Museum. Sports fans with the Hoosier passion for basketball will love the Indiana High School Hall of Fame at New Castle. Historic Indian mounds dot the landscape of Mounds State Park. At Centerville the only surviving log courthouse from the Northwest Territory can be found. Visitors can learn the historic stories of these sites and many more using the Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums – East Central Edition as a guide.

Available On:
Kindle
Kindle Softbound
Smashwords
Smashwords 20% Free Sample
Barnes & Noble
Barnes & Noble - Softbound
Kobo
Google Play
Apple
Create Space - Softcover Book
Paul Wonning's Books on Amazon Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Smashwords Page
Paul Wonning's Books on Apple
Paul Wonning's Books on Kobo
Paul Wonning's Books on Barnes and Noble

© Mossy Feet Books 2016



Back to Top

12 Must-See Sights in New Harmony, Indiana

Roofless Church - New Harmony, Indiana

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - Southwest Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
Southwest Edition

Harmonie State Park combines history, outdoor recreation and stunning river vistas to provide a wonderful family friendly vacation spot. Its location on the banks of the lovely Wabash River provides a wonderful place for fishing and boating on its waters. Trails and picnic tables line its bank and an access ramp allows boaters to lower their watercraft into the river. The picnic area is a wonderful place to watch stunning sunsets over the river.

History buffs will enjoy nearby Historic New Harmony. This fascinating village provides a unique look into two experiments in communal living. Both occurred early in Indiana history here in New Harmony. The Rappites and Harmonites both tried to establish communal living at New Harmony. Neither community succeeded in doing this. However, they left behind a fascinating story, architecture, and community that survives for people to study and enjoy.

The see the rest of the article, click this link.