Monday, April 29, 2013

Birdseye, Indiana

Birdseye, Indiana

County - Dubois
Township - Jefferson
Area - Total - 0.64 sq mi (1.66 km2)
Elevation - 722 ft (220 m)
Population - 416
Time zone EST (UTC-5)
ZIP code - 47513
Area code(s) - 812

Birdseye History
Platted in 1880, local legend attributes the name Birdseye to Reverand "Bird" Johnson who is said to have said, "This suits the Bird's eye," in favor of a site for the proposed post office. A train depot to serve passenger service, was built in 1882. Two stone pillars, east of Oak Street, are all that remain of the depot. The stone jail, which still stands, is built from local stone in 1885. By the early 1900's ,making sorghum was an important part of the local economy. Birdseye High School, built in 1898, was called the Red Birds.

Birdseye Highways
Indiana State Road 164
Indiana State Road 145

Birdseye Railroads
Norfolk Southern


Birdseye Post Office

Birdseye, Indiana Schools

Birdseye Restaurants


Birdseye Lodging
Birdseye Shopping

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Friday, April 26, 2013

Dubois County Airport Authority

Dubois County Airport Authority
2495 W. 900 S.
Huntingburg, IN 47542
812-683-5454
airport@psci.net

[googlemaps https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Dubois+County+Airport+Authority&ie=UTF8&hq=Dubois+County+Airport+Authority&hnear=&radius=15000&t=m&ll=38.249,-86.9546&spn=0.006295,0.006295&output=embed&w=425&h=350]




Bedford

© Indiana Places 2012

Tuesday, April 23, 2013

Bethlehem, IN

Bethlehem, IN

[googlemaps https://maps.google.com/maps?gbv=2&q=Bethlehem,+IN&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Bethlehem,+Clark,+Indiana&gl=us&t=m&z=12&ll=38.544155,-85.458186&output=embed&w=425&h=350]

County - Clark
Township - Bethlehem
Elevation - 469 ft (143 m)
ZIP code - 47162
Population - 41

Storyteller's Riverhouse Bed & Breakfast

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© Indiana Places 2012

Monday, April 22, 2013

Norfolk Southern Railway


Norfolk Southern Railway

The Norfolk Southern Railway operates several lines in Indiana, mostly in the northern portion of the state. There is one route across the southern portion of the state.
The southern route is one which crosses the southern section which crosses Gibson, Pike, Dubios, Crawford, Harrison, Floyd and Clark counties.
Length - About 116 miles

Norfolk Southern Railway

The Norfold Southern Railway operates several lines in Indiana, mostly in the northern portion of the state. There is one route across the southern portion of the state.
The southern route is one which crosses the southern section which crosses Gibson, Pike, Dubios, Crawford, Harrison,Floyd County and Clark counties.
Length - About 116 miles

Indiana State Road 64 in Dubios County
Length - East/West - About 26 Miles
The East/West spur of the Norfolk Southern Railroad enters Dubios County about 3.1 miles from its intersection with Indiana State Road 257 in Pike County. About 10 miles from the county line the railroad intersects US 231 in Huntington. In Huntington it intersects the Norfolk Southern north/south spur. From this intersection it parallels Indiana State Road 64, intersecting Indiana State Road 162 about 4.6 miles east of Huntington. About 11 miles east of State Road 45 it passes through Birdseye and into Crawford County.

Length - North/South - About 8 Miles
The north/south spur of the Norfolk Southern Railroad enters Dubois County about 6 miles from its intersection with Interstate 64 in Spencer County. It then travels about 8 miles north to its junction with the East/West line in Huntington. There are a series of sidings and connecting spurs in this area.

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Indiana Railroads
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Norfolk Southern Railway in Floyd County
Length - About 12.2 miles
The Norfolk Southern Railway enters Floyd County just west of Georgetown. It travels through the town paralleling Indiana State Road. It crosses Interstate 64 near MM 118. Corydon Pike runs alongside it for several miles. It enters New Albany and runs along the Ohio River, crossing Interstate 64, finally entering Clark County.

Floyd County
Indiana Railroads
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© Indiana Places 2013





Norfolk Southern Railway in Floyd County
Length - About 12.2 miles
The Norfolk Southern Railway enters Floyd County just west of Georgetown. It travels through the town paralleling Indiana State Road. It crosses Interstate 64 near MM 118. Corydon Pike runs alongside it for several miles. It enters New Albany and runs along the Ohio River, crossing Interstate 64, finally entering Clark County.

Floyd County
Indiana Railroads
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© Indiana Places 2013

Wednesday, April 17, 2013

Indiana State Routes 111



Indiana State Routes 111
Length - About 25.2 miles

Indiana State Road 111 (River Road) begins at an intersection with Indiana State Road 11 in Harrison County. It ends at an intersection with Indiana State Road 311 (Charlestown Road) in downtown New Albany in Floyd. Portions of the highway in Floyd County have been decommissioned and survive as River Road.


Indiana State Routes 111 in Floyd County
Length - About 10.2 miles
Indiana State Road 111 enters Floyd County about 5.8 miles east of its beginning in Harrison county. After following a course mostly along the
Ohio River it enters New Albany just past Old River Road. It intersects Interstate 64 at MM 123. About 1.3 miles east of this point Indiana State Road 111 turns left and becomes Vincennes Street. About 1 mile north it ends at an intersection with Indiana State Road 311.


Floyd County

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Tuesday, April 16, 2013

Dubois County, Indiana

Dubois County

Dubois County History:
The original inhabitants of the area of Dubois County were the Piankishaw/Shawnee Indian tribe. The Dubois County area saw its first white settlers around 1801. The first settlement, Fort McDonald, which is south of present day Portersville, became established at around this time.
Most of the early settlements formed along the Buffalo Trace, which was a ten to twenty foot wide clearing used by buffalo to migrate from the Illinois plains to the salt licks of Kentucky. Settlers used the Buffalo Trace, as well as the White and Patoka Rivers, to move into the area. Indiana State Road 56 east of Haysville follows the route of the Trace. The communities of Jasper and Haysville began along the trace soon after Fort McDonald.
On December 20, 1817 The Indiana State Legislature took parts of three counties, Orange, Pike and Perry to fashion Dubois County. The County officially came into existence on February 1, 1818. The county draws its name from Toussaint Dubois, a Frenchman who saw action in Revolutionary War, the Battle of Tippecanoe and the War of 1812. Dubois resided mainly in Vincennes, Indiana but visited the area frequently, making the first land entry in the county in 1807.
That same year a substantial portion of the residents of Dubios County died of milk sickness which is really a poisoning caused by cows eating white snakeroot. White snakeroot contains a toxin called temetrol which passes through the cow in its milk, poisoning those who drink the milk.
The first governmental proceedings occurred in Fort McDonald but Porterville became the first county seat in 1818 because of its location on the White River and its nearness to the Buffalo Trace. In 1830 the Indiana State Legislature caused the county seat to be moved to Jasper, where it remains. A fire destroyed the court house in 1839, destroying all county records. A new courthouse replaced the burned one in 1844. The current court house replaced that one in 1911.

Geography
Founded - December 20, 1818
Named for - Toussaint Dubois
Seat - Jasper
Area
Total - 435.33 sq mi
Land - 427.27 sq mi
Water - 8.06 sq mi
Population - 41,889
Congressional district 9th
Area Code - 812

Dubois County is bounded on the west by Pike and Daviess counties. On the north by Martin county. Orange and Crawford counties are to the east and Perry, Spencer and Warrick are to the south.

Celestine Park
Dubois County Highways
Interstate 64
U.S. Route 231
Indiana State Road 56
Indiana State Road 64
Indiana State Road 145
Indiana State Road 162
Indiana State Road 164

Indiana State Road 264
Cities and towns
Birdseye
Ferdinand
Holland
Huntingburg
Ireland
Jasper


Railroads
Dubois County Railroad
Norfolk Southern
Indiana Railroad Museum

Waterways
The Fruits and Flowers Trail

Trail of Faith - Historic Church Trail

Patoka River
East Fork White River

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Wednesday, April 10, 2013

Interstate 64


Interstate 64
Length - Approximately 117 miles

Interstate 64 enters Indiana by crossing the Wabash River into Indiana from Illinois about 33 miles west of its intersection with Interstate 69. On its way it crosses Posey County, Gibson, Spencer, Dubois, Crawford, and FloydCounties.


Interstate 64 in Floyd County
Length - Approximately 16 miles

Interstate 64 enters Floyd County from Harrison County about 16.5 miles from its intersection with Indiana State Road 135. About 3.7 miles from the county line Interstate 64 intersects Indiana State Road 64 at MM 118. At MM 119 US 150 enters Interstate 64 and the two highways run in conjunction the remainder of their routes in Indiana. Interstate 64 and the bypass Interstate 265 meet at MM 121about 3.7 miles east of MM 119 at the municipal border of New Albany. Indiana State Road 111 intersects Interstate 64 at MM 123 about 1.9 miles further on. Interstate 64 leaves Floyd County and Indiana about .75 further east as it crosses the Ohio River into Kentucky.

Floyd County

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Interstate 64 in Dubois County
Length - About 2 Miles
Interstate 64 skirts the southern border of Dubois County entering it twice, for about a mile on the southeast corner of the county and again near its intersection with Indiana State Road 162 just south of Ferdinand. Exit 63 is located at this intersection.

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Martin County Public Library

Martin County Public Library

Loogootee Public Library

Shoals Public Library

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Tuesday, April 9, 2013

New Albany, Indiana

New Albany, Indiana

[googlemaps https://maps.google.com/maps?q=New+Albany+in&oe=UTF-8&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=New+Albany,+Floyd,+Indiana&gl=us&ei=2NzjTJb9AsKUnAeg3NSqDw&oi=geocode_result&ved=0CCcQ8gEwAA&z=12&ll=38.285625,-85.824131&output=embed&w=425&h=350]

County - Floyd
Area Total - 14.8 sq mi (38.3 km2)
Land - 14.6 sq mi (37.9 km2)
Water - 0.2 sq mi (0.4 km2)
Elevation - 449 ft (137 m)
Population (2000) - Total 37,603
Density - 2,570.3/sq mi (992.4/km2)
Time zone - EST
ZIP codes - 47150-47151
Area code(s - 812

In 1813 three brothers named Joel, Abner, and Nathaniel Scribner arrived at the Falls of the Ohio and laid the foundations for New Albany, Indiana. They established the town below the falls, recognizing it as a spot with good commercial possibilities. In 1817 New Albany was incorporated as a town and in 1819 it was chosen as the county seat of newly formed Floyd County.By 1839 New Albany saw enough growth to incorporate as a city. It grew to become one of the largest cities in the entire midwest for the next fifty years.

This growth was fueled by the development of the steam engine and its incorporation as the power source of the riverboats which became the preeminent mode of transportation in the mid 1800's. New Albany became a center of ship building for these grand boats and many of the most prestigous boats, like the Robert E. Lee, were constructed in New Albany shipyards.

New Albany, Indiana is well serviced by transportation systems. Interstate 64 traverses the city on an east west axis and Interstate 265 provides easy access to nearby Interstate 65. The Norfolk Southern Railway connects to the CSX line at New Albany. Norfolk Southern connects Louisville and Princton, Indiana on its way west. CSX links New Albany with Seymour and other rail lines to the north. Indiana State Roads 111 and 62 run through the heart of the city, and US 150 traverses it via Interstate 64. Indiana State Road 311 connects Indiana 111 in downtown New Albany with Interstate 65 in Clark County.

To connect with the attractions of New Albany, click this link.

Streams and Rivers
Silver Creek
Ohio River

Indiana State Routes 111
Honeymoon Mansion B&B & Wedding Chapel
Box Tree Inn
Admiral Bicknell Inn
New Albany Springs Golf Course
Golfers Paradise Driving Range
Cherry Valley Par 3 Golf Course
New Albany-Floyd County Parks
Historic Downtown New Albany
New Albany Town Clock Church
New Albany Riverfront Amphitheater
Great Escape Theatre – New Albany 16
Paul W. Ogle Cultural & Community Center
Scribner House
Culbertson Mansion Historic Site
Carnegie Center for Art and History


New Albany Lodging

New Albany Movie Theaters

New Albany Hospital and Medical

New Albany Post Office

New Albany Restaurants

New Albany Farmers’ Market

New Albany Floyd County Public Library

New Albany Bowling

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© Indiana Places 2013

Georgetown, Indiana

Georgetown, Indiana

Georgetown Geography
County - Floyd
Area - 2.07 sq mi
Land - 2.05 sq mi
Water - 0.02 sq mi
Population (2010) - 2,876
Time zone - EST (UTC-5)

Georgetown History
George Waltz, whom the town is named for, founded Georgetown in 1807 when he settled in the area from Pennslyvannia. The first settler, a man named Patrick Shields, arrived in 1805. Shields built a water powered sawmill at the site of the future village. George Waltz helped two blacksmiths get established in the growing village which still had no name. The farmers in the area found that the easiest way to transport their crops was to turn it into whiskey. A large number of stills appeared along the stream that ran through the developing village, so many that the stream's name was changed from Burton's Branch to Whiskey Run. By 1820 a general store opened and residents persuaded George Waltz, who owned land along Whiskey Run Road, to develop it into lots Whiskey Run Road is now Indiana State Road 64. It developed only along the north side of the road as the owner of the land on the south, John Evans, side was convinced that the new town would fail. Finally in 1833 he developed his land along the road.
A hotel opened in 1835 to serve the stage coach that ran through the town. Construction of a railroad occurred in the early 1880's.

Georgetown Highways
Indiana State Road 64
Interstate 64

Georgetown Railroads
Norfolk Southern


Georgetown Drive In Theater

Georgetown Streams

Georgetown Schools

Georgetown Restaurants

Floyd Memorial Medical Group Georgetown


Georgetown Shopping


Georgetown Post Office

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© Indiana Places 2013

Galena, Indiana

Galena, Indiana

County - Floyd
Area - 2.68 sq mi (6.94 km2)
Land - 2.67 sq mi (6.92 km2)
Water - 0.01 sq mi (0.03 km2)
Elevation - 810 ft (247 m)
Population (2010) - 1,818
Time zone - Eastern
ZIP code - 47119
Area code - 812

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© Indiana Places 2013

Greenville, Indiana

Greenville, Indiana

Greenville, Indiana History
[googlemaps https://maps.google.com/maps?q=Greenville,+Indiana&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=Greenville,+Floyd,+Indiana&gl=us&t=m&z=14&ll=38.372564,-85.986359&output=embed&w=425&h=350]

County - Floyd
Township - Greenville
Area - 0.78 sq mi (2.02 km2)
Elevation - 827 ft (252 m)
Population (2010) - 595
Time zone - EST (UTC-5)
ZIP code - 47124
Area code - 812
FIPS code - 18-29844
GNIS feature ID - 0435458

Greenville, Indiana History
Andrew Mundle, a schoolteacher from Kentucky, and Benjamin Haines, a Pennslyvannia farmer and clockmaker, founded Greenville, Indiana in May of 1816 a little north of the Buffalo Trace with adjoining land they both owned. No one knows the reason the two men chose Greenville as the name of the new town.
The land was located in Clark County at the time. In 1819 Greenville was included in the newly formed Floyd County. It was originally intended to become the county seat of the new county until some leading citizens of New Albany, a town of similar size at the time, offered the county commissioners a city lot and a bell for the court house. New Albany thus became the new county seat.
Greenville had both the first school and the first post office in Floyd County. The school was of was was termed a "blab school." In this type of school the students typically read their lessons out loud, simulteanously. The school actually existed before the town.
Greenville, Indiana grew and eventually many businesses. In 1908 a devestating fire broke out and consumed most of the town. Greenville never did recover from this tragedy, becoming a bedroom community for residents working in nearby Louisville and New Albany.


Greenville Highways
US Route 150
Indiana State Road 335

Streams and Rivers
Indiana Creek



Stones Rest Inn Bed and Breakfast

Greenville Lodging

Greenville Shopping

Greenville Schools
Greenville Post Office
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© Indiana Places 2013

Martin County Shopping

Martin County Shopping


Loogootee Shopping

Shoals Shopping

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