Thursday, June 30, 2011

Atterbury-Bakalar Air Museum - Columbus, Indiana

Atterbury-Bakalar Air Museum - Columbus, Indiana
Atterbury-Bakalar Air Museum - Columbus, Indiana

Markers & Museums
South Central Edition
Marker Placed by Indiana Historical Bureau
Title of Marker:
Atterbury Army Air Field
Location:
In front of chapel at Middle Road and Grissom Avenue, Atterbury Army Air Field, Columbus (Bartholomew County, Indiana)
Installed by:
2007 Indiana Historical Bureau and Atterbury-Bakalar Air Museum
Marker ID #:
03.2007.2
Marker Text:
Side one:
Construction begun summer 1942 under Captain Stratton O. Hammon, who used broad authority over laborers, suppliers, and railroad; base in use February 1943. More than 1, 000 workers employed during construction. Base was over 2, 000 acres, cost over four million dollars, and included more than one hundred buildings, intended to be temporary.
Side two:
WW II uses included training B-25, B-26, and glider pilots; by 1944, wounded from Europe received here for Wakeman Hospital. Wounded soldiers during Korean War received here. Renamed 1954 to honor Lt. John Bakalar. Base closed 1970. Original building made into chapel; restored and named for Women's Air Service Pilot Jean Lewellen Norbeck 1990s.
Atterbury-Bakalar Air Museum - Columbus, Indiana
Atterbury-Bakalar Air Museum - Columbus, Indiana

Brief History
The task of organizing the mammoth task of constructing the airfields needed to train 70,000 pilots annually fell to General of the Army and General of the Air Force Henry Harley "Hap" Arnold. He moved the responsibility of building air bases from the overburdened Quartermaster Corps to the U. S. Army Corps of Engineer. The Army had no plan for any of the bases, only a set of guidelines that followed General Arnold's concept of "Spartan" simplicity for the bases. There would be no frills or creature comforts at these bases. The buildings would be simple lumber and tar paper construction. These buildings were quite cold in winter and hot in summer. The hangers were of wood or concrete. The guidelines called for one secure hanger to hide the Norden bombsight, which was top-secret. Atterbury's construction followed these guidelines during its construction. The United States, in the face of major war, needed a lot of air bases and it needed them fast. The site that Atterbury would occupy had been open cornfields. This land needed to be turned into a United States Army Air Field as quickly as possible.
Atterbury-Bakalar Air Museum Military Memorabilia
Atterbury-Bakalar Air Museum Military Memorabilia

The Atterbury-Bakalar Air Museum
The Atterbury-Bakalar Air Museum preserves the memory and history of this airfield. Located on site, the museum is a treasure trove of memorabilia, history and exhibits covering the Atterbury Army Air Field and Bakalar Air Base.

Atterbury-Bakalar Air Museum Military Memorabilia
Atterbury-Bakalar Air Museum Military Memorabilia

The Atterbury-Bakalar Air Museum is located near the control tower across the street from the F4C Phantom Jet Fighter static display at the Columbus Indiana Municipal Airport. This is the former location of the Atterbury Army Air Field and Bakalar Air Force Base. The museum is just a few steps from the ramp and control tower.
This small, but intense museum contains a plethora of models, artifacts and photos relating to the history of Bakalar Air Base and the Atterbury army camp. My wife and I spent a couple of hours just browsing the exhibits and models. It is well worth the few hours time that it takes you to browse the museum. For more information, contact:
Atterbury-Bakalar Air Museum
4742 Ray Boll Boulevard
Columbus, Indiana 47203
(812) 372-4356

© Paul Wonning 2016

Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Anderson Falls - Bartholomew County, Columbus Indiana

Anderson Falls - Columbus Indiana
Anderson Falls - Columbus Indiana
Anderson Falls - Columbus Indiana

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South Central Edition
The Falls
Anderson Falls is a fourteen-foot waterfall that is almost one hundred feet wide on the Fall Fork of Clifty Creek. The falls formed because of a layer of Louisville Limestone overlying a less resilient layer of Waldron Shale. Visitors will see an impressive flow of water cascade over the falls, especially in the winter, spring and early summer when rainfall is abundant. The falls offers easy access as it is right along the road, adjacent to the parking area. A paved trail affords visitors a good view of it and a path down allows visitors to view the base.
Fall Fork Clifty Creek
The Fall Fork of Clifty Creek rises in Decatur County just west of Greensburg east of County Road 350 W and Indiana State Road 46 and south of Base Road. It flows through Decatur County and into Bartholomew, finally entering Clifty Creek southwest of Hartsville.



Fall Fork of Clifty Creek in Bartholomew County
Fall Fork of Clifty Creek in Bartholomew County

Fall Fork of Clifty Creek in Bartholomew County
Length - About 3 miles
It flows into Bartholomew County from Decatur County between County Road 200 N and County Road 300 N after crossing County Road 1200 E. It crosses County Road 200 N twice before flowing northwest to its junction with Clifty Creek southwest of Hartsville and a little north of Indiana State Road 46.
Whitewater enthusiasts will find a whitewater rafting trail on this creek. The put in is at the western crossing of County Road 200 N. The take out spot is just above Anderson Falls. This is a 1.3-mile difficult run.
The Park

Purchased by the Nature Conservancy in 1977, the Bartholomew County Park Board now manages the forty-four acre Anderson Falls Nature Preserve. Thick forests surround the falls and a rich diversity of wildflowers populate the forest floor and canyon sides. The classic beech/maple forest also includes shagbark hickory, white oak and buckeye trees. The best time to visit for wildflowers is in the spring. Birdwatchers will delight in the abundant bird population that includes songbirds, hawks and woodpeckers. The park includes a picnic area, pit toilets and a nature trail.
Nature Trail
The trail network around the falls provides a wonderful hike. This area is actually the nature preserve and is open to the public. The moderate trail passes through the forest described earlier and in places offers a good view of the falls.
Note: the trail may be inaccessible, as hikers must cross the creek above or below the falls to access it.
Summer Wading
Wading Fall Creek
Wading Fall Creek

During the summer months, visitors to the falls may wade in the cool, rocky waters for some distance above the falls. On weekends, many locals visit the falls to cool off in the cascading waters.
Getting There
Visitors will find Anderson Falls about eight miles east of Columbus, Indiana on County Road 1140 E. To get to Anderson Falls, drive east from Columbus on Indiana State Road 46. About 1.35 miles from the SR 46 intersection with Indiana State Road 9 you will come to a little town called Newbern. About .6 miles from Newbern, you will want to turn right on County Road 925 E. After driving a very short distance, the road makes a ninety degree turn and becomes County Road 200 N. About 2.11 miles after this turn you will reach County Road 1140 E. Turn left. The parking lot is on the left, the falls is on the right.

Anderson Falls
County Road 1140 E
Bartholomew County, Indiana

© Indiana Places 2017

Monday, June 27, 2011

Blue's Canoe Livery

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
 Markers & Museums
South Central Edition
Blue's Canoe Livery

The most popular river trips flow through a secluded state wildlife preserve and a part of the Camp Atterbury wilderness area. This section of river is alive with deer, beaver, great blue heron, osprey, wild turkey and excellent smallmouth bass for fishing. There are occasional mild rapids for added excitement.
Blues Canoe Livery offers camping at their campground in addition to raft, canoe and kayak trips along the Driftwood River.
Blue's Canoe Livery
4220 W. 700 N.
Edinburgh, IN 46124
812-526-9851


© Indiana Places 2016

Friday, June 24, 2011

Taylorsville, Indiana

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South Central Edition
Taylorsville, Indiana

Taylorsville, Indiana
County - Bartholomew
Area - 1.0 sq mi
Elevation - 653 ft
Population (2010) - 919
ZIP code - 47280
Area code - 812

Originally called Herod when platted in 1849, Taylorsville is located immediately south of Edinsburgh on US 31.



Highways include:
US Route 31
Interstate 65

Railroads
Louisville and Indiana rail line

Back to Bartholomew County

Back to Cities and Towns

© Indiana Places 2011

Thursday, June 23, 2011

Indiana State Flower - Peony

[caption id="attachment_1276" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Indiana State Flower - The Peony"]Indiana State Flower - The Peony[/caption]

Peony
Paeonia lactiflora:hybr.
Family – Paeonicaceae – Peony

In Indiana the peony begins blooming in mid to late May and continues through early to mid June. The peony is the state flower of Indiana. It will bloom for a couple of weeks, then will display attractive green foliage the rest of the season.




The peony is a hardy stalwart of the perennial flower garden. It is a native of the far east – Mongolia and Siberia. The peony was introduced into Europe in 1548 and has been hybridized into many different varieties.

Peonies are best planted in the fall, August and September here in southern Indiana. They may also be divided then. The peony will exist for many years needing little care, thriving in all areas of the state. When bloom ceases or declines, you must divide the clump to increase the flower supply. This may happen every five years or so. Or never.

Back to About Indiana

Jonesville, Indiana

Jonesville, Indiana


Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South Central Edition
County - Bartholomew
Township - Wayne
Area Total - 0.1 sq mi (0.3 km2)
Elevation - 594 ft (181 m)
Population (2010) - Total 177
Time zone - EST (UTC-5)
ZIP code - 47247
Area code(s) - 812



Jonesville, Indiana is located just off Indiana State Road 11 on County Road 950 South. The Louisville and Indiana rail line passes through the town. Named after its founder, Benjamin Jones, in 1851, the Post Office was established the next year.
Lora L. Corum, the winner of the 1924 Indy 500 was born in Jonesville.

© Indiana Places 2016

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

Indiana State Flag

[caption id="attachment_2088" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Indiana State Flag"]Indiana State Flag[/caption]

The Indiana State Flag was adopted to celebrate Indiana's centenial in 1916




The Indiana State Flag was adopted to celebrate Indiana's centenial in 1916 from a design submitted by Paul Hadley of Mooresville, Indiana. The adoption of the Indiana State Flag design resulted from the Indiana Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution holding a contest at the request of the Indiana General Assembly. A one hundred dollar prize was offered, which resulted in over two hundred entries. The Indiana State Flag was adopted on May 31, 1917.




The current statute that governs the design of the Indiana State Flag states:


The Indiana State Flag's dimensions shall be three feet fly by two feet hoist; or five feet fly by three feet hoist; or any size proportionate to either of those dimensions. The field of the flag shall be blue with nineteen stars and a flaming torch in gold or buff. Thirteen stars shall be arranged in an outer circle, representing the original thirteen states; five stars shall be arranged in a half circle below the torch and inside the outer circle of stars, representing the states admitted prior to Indiana; and the nineteenth star, appreciably larger than the others and representing Indiana shall be placed above the flame of the torch. The outer circle of stars shall be so arranged that one star shall appear directly in the middle at the top of the circle, and the word "Indiana" shall be placed in a half circle over and above the star representing Indiana and midway between it and the star in the center above it. Rays shall be shown radiating from the torch to the three stars on each side of the star in the upper center of the circle.

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Hope, Indiana

 Hope, Indiana

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South Central Edition
County - Bartholomew
Township - Haw Creek
Area Total - 1.0 sq mile
Elevation - 715 ft
Population (2010) - Total 2,102
Time zone  - Eastern
ZIP code - 47246
Area code(s) - 812

Hope 
The dream of establishing a purely Moravian church community motivated Reverend Martin Hauser and his family to leave Salem, North Carolina in late 1829 and move to the Indiana frontier. A few friends and family members accompanied the Hauser family. Members of the Provincial Helpers Conference of the Moravian Church in Salem had promised to provide Hauser with the funds to purchase land to establish a Moravian town and church in Indiana after he had proved his intentions worthy by building a cabin. He, his brother and several others left Salem on September 28, 1829. After a month's travel, the band reached Columbus, Indiana.
Building the Cabin
Bitter weather and sickness delayed Martin delayed the cabin's completion until early March. Hauser mailed a letter to the Moravians in North Carolina that his cabin was complete and he was ready to establish the town. The money slated for the purchase of the land arrived in early April and on April 5, 1830 he sent a messenger to Indianapolis to purchase the land.
Goshen, then Hope
The setters established the town, calling it Goshen. When the town applied for a post office in 1834, they changed the name to Hope because Indiana already had a town named Goshen.
Moravian Church
The Moravians are one of the oldest Protestant Christian churches in the world, dating from about 1457 in Bohemia. Reformer Jan Hus disagreed with several practices in the Catholic Church and started the Hussite movement that evolved into the Moravian Church.  In 1722 members of the church fled to Saxony to escape religious persecution. They established a settlement in Germany called Herrnhut. From this village the Moravians started the first international missionary movment, establihing settlements in many countries.
Hope, Indiana is located on Indiana State Road 9 about seven miles north of its intersection with Indiana State Road 46. The town is northeast of Columbus, Indiana. For more information about the town's history, events, dining, shopping and attractions visit:
Visitor Information Center
645 Harrison Street
Hope, In 47246-1203
812-546-7038

Email: MEAlbert@hopeinfocenter.com

Yellow Trail Museum 
644 Main Street
Hope, IN 47246
(812) 546-4877

© Indiana Places 2016

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Indiana State Bird - Northern Cardinal

[caption id="attachment_3500" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Indiana State Bird - Northern Cardinal"]Indiana State Bird - Northern Cardinal[/caption]

Northern Cardinal

Cardinalis cardinalis Family - Cardinalidae

The Northern Cardinal will sometimes visit a bird feeder in fairly large numbers. I counted a dozen male northern cardinals one snowy January day around the flower garden in front of the house. There were a like number of females, though they are not as visible. The Virginia nightingale, as they are sometimes referred to, are seed eaters, so they enjoy the sunflower seeds offered in our feeder. In the spring, the male will pick one of the tallest trees to sit in the top of and sing. The song bird defends his territory in this way. Answering cardinals can be heard at varying distances throughout the forest. The northern cardinal is the Indiana State Bird.

The cardinal eats a varied diet. Fruit, seeds and waste vegetation makes up the bulk of its food, but it will also feast on insects and small animals also. Because of their eating habits the redbird makes a nice visitor to the garden.



The cardinal eats a varied diet. Fruit, seeds and waste vegetation makes up the bulk of its food, but it will also feast on insects and small animals also. Because of their eating habits the redbird makes a nice visitor to the garden.

Virginia nightingales were once popular cage birds until Migratory Bird Treaty Act of 1918 banned the sale of the brightly colored redbirds. Cardinals are very common in the eastern portion of the United States and it is the only crested song bird in North America.

During the spring mating season the male cardinal will chase off other males which invade his territory. The female builds a nest in a low bush, preferable close to a water supply. The male redbird will feed the female while she roosts on the eggs, and both sexes feed the young until they fledge. At this time the male will chase off any male offspring.

Northern cardinals generally don’t migrate unless the weather turns really nasty in the winter. So the redbird will add color to your garden year round and will treat your ears to its song for most of it. Cardinals are present here in our State of Indiana are present year round.

Habitat for the Virginia nightingale is not hard to provide. Shrubby plants like forsythia, barberry, holly, and box will provide the northern cardinal with both nesting spots and shelter from inclement weather. A fountain, garden pond, or bird bath is a good water source. And a bird feeder well stocked with sunflower seeds will encourage the redbirds to visit the garden frequently. The State Bird of Indiana is a colorful welcome visitor to any garden.

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Hartsville, Indiana

Hartsville, Indiana

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South Central Edition
County - Bartholomew
Area Total - 0.3 sq mi
Elevation - 761 ft (232 m)
Population (2010) Total - 362
ZIP code - 47244
Area code(s) - 812

Hartsville, Indiana is located on Indiana State Road 46, .65 miles from the Decatur and Bartholomew County line. Founded in 1832, Hartsville derives its name from Gideon B. Hart, an early settler. The post office was established in 1838.
Gideon Blackburn Hart (Oct. 29, 1798 - Feb. 22, 1854)
The fifth son of Joseph and Nancy Hart, Gideon was native to Maryville, Blount County, Tennessee. His father, a teacher, provided him with an education which he used, at age 20, to teach in a local school. The money he earned as a teacher, he used to purchase a horse and traveling gear. In 1820, he traveled to Palestine, Illinois, near the Wabash River. He taught school there for a few months, and then traveled to Vincennes to inspect the prospects in Indiana, as his father wished to immigrate to Indiana. From Vincennes, he went to Bartholomew County. He decided to settle there and returned to Kentucky. He returned with them around 1821 and settled in the area that is now Hartsville. After settling in Indiana, he married Hetty A. Taylor, with whom he had nine children. He gained election as sheriff by beating his opponent in a corn-husking contest. The men divided a pile of corn into two piles while at a corn husking. The other men present agreed they would all vote for whoever won the contest. Hart beat his opponent husking corn, and thus the election.
Hartsville College

Hartsville was home to Hartsville College, which was chartered on January 12, 1850. It was first known as Hartsville Academy. Hartsville College burned down on January 30, 1898 and was not rebuilt. Milton Wright, the father of Orville and Wilbur Wright, served as theology professor at this college from 1868 to 1869. He was a student at the college in 1853 when he met his wife to be Susan Koerner.

© Indiana Places 2016

Monday, June 20, 2011

Elizabethtown, Indiana

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South Central Edition
Elizabethtown, Indiana
County - Bartholomew
Township - Sand Creek
Area Total - 0.3 sq mi
Elevation - 636 ft
Population (2010) - Total 504
ZIP codes - 47232, 47236
Area code(s) - 812
Elizabethtown, Indiana is about .75 miles from Indiana State Road 7 via East Legal Tender Road and about one mile from US Route 31 via County Road 475 South.
History
Platted in 1845, Elizabethtown derives its name from wife of the name of the town's founder, Thomas Branham.
Thomas Branham (Jul. 20, 1772 - Sep. 3, 1827)
The son of Tavener Branham and Elizabeth [Burbridge] Branham, Thomas was native to Spotsylvania County, Virginia. He married Elizabeth Herndon around 1800. The couple would have ten children. Sometime after they married the couple moved to Scott County, Kentucky. Elizabeth died in 1813. Thomas moved to Jefferson County, Indiana, where he met his second wife, Margaret Williams. He and Margaret would have five children. In the early 1820's the couple moved to Bartholomew County Indiana. He founded a settlement that he called Elizabethtown, Indiana, naming it after his first wife.

© Indiana Places 2016

Friday, June 17, 2011

Edinburgh, Indiana

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South Central Edition
Edinburgh, Indiana
Counties - Johnson, Bartholomew, Shelby
Townships - Blue River, German, Jackson
Area - Total - 2.8 sq mi
Elevation - 673 ft
Population (2010) - 4,480
ZIP code - 46124
Area code(s) - 812

Platted in 1832, the origin of Edinburgh's name is not certain. Some ascertain its naming to an early Scotch resident called Alexander Thompson, who named it in honor of his home city. Another legend ascribes the name to early residents who compared the beauty of the area to "Eden."  It is located near the confluence of the Big Blue River and Sugar Creek which join to form the Driftwood River. Camp Atterbury, a National Guard training facility, is located west of the town. Edinburgh was platted in 1822 and was incorporated in 1853, Edinburgh lies astride three counties, Johnson, Bartholomew and Shelby. The town lies predominately in Johnson County.
Interested visitors can learn more of the history of Edinburgh at this link.

Highways include:
Indiana State Road 252
US Route 31
Interstate 65

Railroads
Louisville and Indiana rail line

Attractions:
Edinburgh Premium Outlets®
11622 NE Executive Dr
Edinburgh, IN 46124-9133
Blue's Canoe Livery
Heflin Memorial Park
Driftwood Camp
Driftwood State Fishing Area
Azalia State Public Access Site

National Registry Districts  
South Walnut Street Historic Distric
Toner Historic District
Edinburgh Commercial Historic District.

Edinburgh
107 S Holland St
P.O. Box 65
Edinburgh, IN 46124
(812) 526-3514 x 1

© Indiana Places 2016

Thursday, June 16, 2011

Columbus, Indiana

Residential Street - Columbus, IN
Residential Street - Columbus, IN

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South Central Edition
Columbus, Indiana
County - Bartholomew
Government
Area Total - 26.4 sq mi
Land - 25.9 sq mi
Water - 0.4 sq mi
Elevation - 630 ft
Population (2010) - Total - 44,061
Time zone - Eastern
ZIP codes - 47201-47203
Area code(s) - 812

Columbus, Indiana
Natives
Potawatami and Delaware Indian villages originally occupied the land occupied by Columbus. The Treaty of St. Mary’s in 1818 had opened the area for settlement. The terms of the treaty gave the native inhabitants three years to vacate. White settlement into the area began almost immediately.
The Land
Well supplied with water, several substantial creeks and rivers flowed through the area that would become Columbus and Bartholomew County. These included Driftwood River, Flatrock River, Big Sand Creek, Little Sand Creek, Clifty Creek, Blue River, Rock Creek, Haw Creek, Duck Creek, Tough Creek, White Creek, Bear Creek, Denio’s Creek and Nineveh Creek. Most of the creeks and rivers possessed enough water flow to provide power for gristmills, a necessary structure for the pioneers. They also provided a means of transportation in a time when most goods traveled by flatboat. Roads were poor or nonexistent, thus waterways were important. The Indiana General Assembly designated the Driftwood River a public highway in 1824. Fertile soil under laid the thick forest cover, attracting settlers that wished to farm the rich, newly opened land.
General John Tipton and Luke Bonesteel purchased the land on which Columbus, Indiana sits in 1820 after visiting the area earlier that year. The men donated the land for the city shortly afterwards. The Indiana General Assembly created Bartholomew County on January 9, 1821 and appointed a commission consisting of four men to choose the site for a county seat. After inspecting the area, the men met at Tolm Parker's cabin on Haw Creek to reach a decision on February 12, 1821. The commissioners agreed upon a spot and named it Tiptonia in honor of John Tipton. They would later change the name to Columbus, in honor of the explorer, on March 20, 1821.
John Tipton (August 14, 1786 – April 5, 1839)
John was born in Sevier County, Tennessee, where his father died in an Amerindian raid. He moved to Harrison County, Indiana in 1803 and married Martha Shields. He farmed and fought natives, leading a unit of the famed Yellow Jackets during the Battle of Tippecanoe. His next military experience was commanding Fort Vallonia as major during the War of 1812. He gained election to the Indiana State House of Representatives from 1819 to 1823. During this time, he was involved in the formation of Bartholomew County and its county seat, Columbus. Tipton also served on the committee that explored the area around the White River and chose the state capitol in 1820.
Development
John Williamson opened the first general store in the fall of 1821. Roads built from Madison on the Ohio River, Indianapolis, and Chicago on Lake Michigan spurred growth. The first gristmill began operation in 1834, adding to the blacksmiths and other tradesmen that practiced in the growing community. Flatboats took agricultural goods to the Wabash River and thence to New Orleans via the Driftwood River. By July 1844, the Madison & Indianapolis Rail Road reached Columbus, providing a cheap, fast and reliable means of transporting both freight and passengers. Industries developed and the town grew to be a city.
International Reputation
Columbus has gained an international reputation for its unique, award winning architecture due to the efforts of industrialist J. Irwin Miller, founder of Cummins Engine Company. The city possesses an impressive collection of architectural masterpieces designed some of the world's finest architects. In addition to fine buildings, visitors will find museums, great shopping, dining and a wonderful array of parks and trails. Columbus is a small city that packs a lot in its small package.
Visitors may call the visitor center, or visit the provided link, to learn all about visiting one of Indiana's finest small cities.
For a list of current lodgings and restaurants, click the Columbus link provided.
Columbus Area Visitors Center
(800) 468-6564
(812) 378-2622

Columbus Indiana Tours
Columbus offers several tours of many different themes including architectural, garden and walking tours. For more information, click the link.


Highways include:
Indiana State Road 46
Indiana State Road 11
Indiana State Road 7
US Route 31
Interstate 65

Railroads
Louisville and Indiana rail line

Attractions:
Simmons Winery
Anderson Falls
kidscommons Children’s Museum
The Columbus Center for Visual Communications
Atterbury-Bakalar Air Museum
Freedom Field
Zaharakos Ice Cream Parlor
Bartholomew County Historical Society
Cummins Corporate Headquarters Museum
Columbus People Trails
Smith's Winery
Columbus Putt-Putt Miniature Golf
Columbus Skateland
Simply Pottery, Inc
Chapman T. Blackwell III Park
Clifty Park
Donner Park
Harrison Ridge Park
Lincoln Park
Mill Race Park
Noblitt Park
Grouse Ridge State Fishing Area
Fishing - White River -- East Fork
Columbus Woods-N-Waters Kampground
Touch the Earth Nature Preserve
Oak Knoll Golf Course
Otter Creek Golf Course
Sycamore Golf Club
Hamilton Ice Center
Clifty Covered Bridge
Charwood Corporate Suites
Ruddick-Nugent House Bed & Breakfast (and Gardens)
Inn at Irwin Gardens
© Indiana Places 2016

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

Clifford, Indiana

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South Central Edition
Clifford, Indiana

County - Bartholomew
Township - Flat Rock
Area - Total 0.1 sq mi
Elevation - 659 ft
Population (2010) - 233
ZIP code - 47226
Area code(s) - 812
Founded in 1853, Clifford is northeast of Columbus at the intersection of County Road 250 E and County Road 550N a short distance from CR 550N's intersection with North Marr Road. The post office, established the same year, is on Mill Street.
The following history is summarized from an account compiled by Ellen E. Capper
Delaware and Potawatami
Until 1829, the Potawatami and Delaware Indians lived in the area known as the Hawpatch plateau. The name originates from name derives from the thick growth of Haw trees that covered the area. The thick, fertile soils attracted pioneers to the area. William Connor visited the area in 1816 on a flatboat that he floated down the Flat Rock River.
White Settlement
He came with trade goods to exchange with the natives that lived in the area. Early resident John Hamner moved into the area in 1819 and found large number of wigwams in the eastern region of the Flat Rock, Driftwood and Blue Rivers. By 1829, the natives had vacated the area. The first white child in the area, John Tipton Lindsey, was born in 1819. The October 6, 1818 Treaty of St. Mary's opened the land up for settlement and land sales at Indianapolis, Brookville or Jeffersonville began. Settlers in the area flooded into the land offices to claim land. The rich soils in the area assured that the land sold quickly, which it did.  Flatboats plying the Driftwood and Flatrock Rivers provided the main means of transportation out of the area for the agricultural goods produced by the farmers until 1844. The Madison & Indianapolis Rail Road completed its tracks to Columbus that same year, providing a better method of transportation.
Clifford
David Richardson purchased the land that became Clifford on October 2, 1823. Thomas Markland and his son-in law Isaac P. Watson platted the town of Clifford and executed the plat on September 2, 1853. The town grew quickly and soon included churches, schools, mechanics, general store, blacksmith, sawmill and other mainstays of a pioneer town. The town incorporated on April of 1883 and still exists in the peaceful Indiana countryside. For more, visit this link.

Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Bartholomew County Indiana

Bartholomew County Courthouse
Bartholomew County Courthouse
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South Central Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
 South Central Edition
Bartholomew County
Founded - January 9, 1821
Seat - Columbus
Area - 409.36 sq mi
Population (2010) - 76,794
The Indiana Legislature created Bartholomew County on February 12, 1821 and takes its name from Lieutenant Colonel Joseph Bartholomew, wounded at the Battle of Tippecanoe. Local legend says that Colonel Bartholomew and General John Tipton rode horses through the area in May 1820, surveying the possibilities of the area that would become Batholomew County. Tipton purchased several parcels of land shortly after, which formed the nucleus of future County Seat, Columbus, Indiana.
Joseph Bartholomew  (March 15, 1766 – November 3, 1840) 
The son of Daniel Bartholomew, Jr. and Elizabeth Catharine Bartholomew, Joseph was native to Amwell, Hunterdon, New Jersey. The family moved to Pennsylvanian around 1768, where is father died. His mother remarried, however the stepfather treated the Bartholomew children poorly. Joseph had little formal education and schooled himself in the ways of the frontier. He became an expert rifleman and experienced in woodcraft. He also acquired skills in surveying and land titles. Joseph gained a reputation as an "Indian fighter" during this period. He married Christiana Peckinpaugh around 1788 - 1790, with whom he had ten children. The young family floated down the Ohio River by flatboat to the area around Louisville, Kentucky around 1795.
Clark County
Move to Clark County, Indiana
Bartholomew was present at the signing of the 1795 Treaty of Greenville, having taken part in General Anthony Wayne's campaign, which ended with the Battle of Fallen Timbers. Sometime around 1800 the family moved to Clark  County. he settled in the  Clark's Grant near the town of Charlestown., Indiana where he surveyed land and took part in the defense against the natives.He built the first brick house in Clark County. On May 10, 1818 his wife died giving birth. On July 30, 1812 he married Elizabeth McNaught, with whom he had five children. Elizabeth died in a horse riding accident in 1824. Bartholomew would not remarry.
War of 1812
On September 21, 1803 he had received a commission as a major in the Clark County militia. he would rise to Lieutenant Colonel, a rank he held during the Battle of Tippecanoe.  During the battle he was shot in the arm. His service during the battle gained him the rank of brigadier general. He would serve later in the White River Campaign, a short lived march up the White River Valley from Vincennes to an area north of present day Indianapolis that terminated when the soldiers involved found most of the native villages abandoned.
Farmer in Indiana and Move to Illinois
After the war, he took up farming and stayed active in area politics. He served as an elector for President James Monroe in 1816. He was also on the commission that chose the site of the new state capitol, Indianapolis, in 1820. His later claim to “have dug the first dirt for the State capital," stemmed from his piling a mound of dirt to mark the spot of the new capitol. The Indiana legislature honored him by naming Bartholomew County after him in 1821. he would later serve in various elected political offices and took part in the 1837 Black Hawk War after he moved to Illinois. Bartholomew passed away in Clarksville, Illinois on November 3, 1840 and is interred at Clarksville Cemetery in McLean County.
Bartholomew County Courthouse
Irish born archetype  Isaac Hodgson designed the court house, one of six he designed in Indiana. Construction began in 1870 and completed in 1874. the court house cost $225,000 to build.
Isaac Hodgson  (1826–1909)
A native of Belfast, Ireland, Hodgson immigrated to the United States in 1848. He started in New York, but came to Louisville, Kentucky in 1849. He became a full architech in 1855 and during his career he worked mostly in Indiana and Minnesota. He designed six Indiana court houses, the Marion County courthouse and several notable buildings in Minnesota after he moved there in 1882.
Bartholomew County towns include Clifford, Columbus, Edinburgh, Elizabethtown, Hartsville, Hope, Jonesville and Taylorsville.
The major highways in the county include Interstate 65, US 31.svg U.S. Route 31, Indiana State Road 7, Indiana State Road 9, Indiana State Road 11, Indiana State Road 46, and Indiana State Road 58.
Major waterways include the East Fork of the White River, Driftwood River, and the Flatrock River.
Railroads include the Louisville and Indiana Railroad.7
Public schools in Bartholomew County are the Bartholomew Consolidated School Corporation the Flat Rock-Hawcreek School Corporation and the International School of Columbus.
Camp Atterbury occupies the northwestern corner of the county.
You may access the attractions of Bartholomew County, contact:
Columbus Area Visitors Center
506 5th Street
Columbus, Indiana 47203
(800) 468-6564
(812) 378-2622

Monday, June 13, 2011

Indiana State Road 62

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
 South East Edition
Indiana State Road 62

Indiana State Road 62 begins on the Illinois Border  as Illinois State Road 141crosses th e Wabash River into Indiana. The highway traverses about 228 miles through southern Indiana and ends at an intersection with US Route 50 near Dillsboro, Indiana. Indiana State Road 62 crosses Posey, Warrick, Spencer, Dubois, Perry, Crawford, Harrison, Floyd, Clark, Jefferson, Switzerland, Ripley, and Dearborn  Counties.

Indiana State Road 62 in Floyd County
Length - About 13.8 Miles
Indiana State Road 62 enters Floyd County from Harrison County about 10 miles from its intersection with Indiana State Road 135 in Corydon. About 3.8 miles northeast of this point Indiana State Road 62 intersects, and joins, Interstate 64 at MM 119. Indiana State Road 62 follows Interstate 64 for 3.7 miles, leaving it at the border of New Albany. At MM 121 it follows Interstate 265 for 11.3 miles where it leaves Floyd County and enters Clark County.

Indiana State Road 62 in Clark County
Length - Approximately 34 miles
Indiana State Road 62 enters Clark County from Harrison County about 11 miles from its intersection with Indiana State Road 135 in Corydon, Indiana. About 1 mile east of the county line 62 intersects Indiana State Road 11 as it comes in from the east. About 3 miles northwest Indiana State Road 62 intersects Interstate 64 and Indiana State Road 64 near New Albany and has access to the Interstate via Exit 118 and the two highways follow the same course for 3.4 miles. Interstate 64/Indiana State Road 62 intersect US Route 150 at Exit 119. 2.1 miles further east Interstate 64/Indiana State Road 62 meet Interstate 265 at Exit 121 in Clarksville and Indiana State Road 62 breaks away from Interstate 64 and follows Interstate 265 for about 5.5 miles. Indiana 62 departs Interstate 265 in Jeffersonville and travels northeast for 11.2 miles to an intersection with Indiana State Road 3 in Charlestown. About 15.3 miles to the northeast Indiana State Road 62 exits Clark County and enters Jefferson County. The highway passes through Jeffersonville, Charlestown and New Washington in Clark County.

Indiana State Road 62 in Jefferson County
Length - About 31.7 miles
Indiana State Road 62 enters Jefferson County from Clark County about 15.2 miles from its intersection with Indiana State Road 3 in Charlestown, Indiana. About 7.2 miles north of the the county line it intersects Indiana State Road 56 which it follows for 5.2 miles until it branches north on the western side of Madison, Indiana where it becomes Clifty Drive. About 3 miles from this point Indiana State Road 62 passes the north entrance for Clifty Falls State Park. About 1.1 miles east of the Park Indiana State Road 62 intersects Indiana State Road 7. About 2.7 miles east of this intersection Indiana State Road 62 intersects US Route 421. About 5.3 miles northeast of US Route 421 Indiana State Road 62 intersects Indiana State Road 250. The roads run concurrently for 7.4 miles. Indiana State Road 62 exits Jefferson County and enters Ripley County about 3.4 miles northeast of this intersection.

Indiana State Road 62 in Switzerland County
Length - About .5 miles
Indiana State Road 62 just touches the northwest corner of Switzerland County as it joins Indiana State Road 129. The two highways run in conjunction until both leave the Switzerland/Jefferson County Line and enter Ripley County.

Indiana State Road 62 in Ripley County
Indiana State Road 62 loops through southeastern Ripley County, entering the county about one mile southwest of its intersection with Indiana State Road 129, which it follows for about 2.5 miles. It leaves Ripley County about 5.6 miles northeast of this intersection and enters Dearborn County, after going through Friendship, Indiana.

Indiana State Road 62 in Dearborn County
Indiana State Road 62 enters Dearborn County about seven miles southwest of Dillsboro, Indiana from Ripley County. It ends at an intersection with US Route 50 just east of Dillsboro after passing through the town.


Indiana State Road 256


Indiana State Road 256

[googlemaps https://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&q=E+State+Road+256,+Austin,+Scott,+Indiana+47102&aq=&sll=39.810235,-85.209884&sspn=0.010269,0.026157&ie=UTF8&geocode=FXoxTwId0Zvj-g&split=0&hq=&hnear=E+State+Road+256,+Austin,+Scott,+Indiana+47102&z=14&ll=38.744442,-85.746735&output=embed&w=425&h=350]

Indiana State Road 256 begins in the west with an intersection on Indiana State Road 39 about 5.34 miles north of its intersection with Indiana State Road 56. It ends about 27 miles east at an intersection with Indiana State Road 56 just west of Madison, Indiana. On its way east it crosses Washington, Jackson, Scott and Jefferson Counties.



Indiana State Road 256 in Jackson County

Indiana State Road 256 traverses about 3 miles of Jackson County's extreme southern tip. It intersects no other highways or railroads in Jackson County. It connects to US Route 31 via County Road 1025 E/Bethany Road through Crothersville. Turn north on County Road 1025 E, travel about 3.5 miles to County Road 600 S, turn right through Crothersville and you will intersect US Route 31.

© Indiana Places 2011

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Indiana State Road 56 in Jefferson County
Length - About 11.7 miles



Indiana State Road 256 enters Jefferson County about 2.5 miles east of its intersection with Indiana State Road 203 in Scott County. About .5 miles after crossing into Jefferson County it intersects Indiana State Road 3. It ends at an intersection with Indiana State Road 56 west of Madison, Indiana.


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Friday, June 10, 2011

Batesville Auto Tour

Batesville Auto Tour






Start out at Memorial Building on Main. Maps of area inside.
Batesville Memorial Building

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South East Edition
With back to Memorial Building, Sherman House is on the right, across street on other side of George Street.
Drive towards George Street. Turn left. Cross Walnut, Batesville Area Historical Society on left.

Batesville Area Historical Society
Batesville Area Historical Society

Continue on George Street until you reach Mulberry Street
Turn left.
Proceed across RR tracks. Parking for Brum Woods is on the right.

Brum Woods
Brum Woods

Turn right on Central Ave and then right on Park Avenue.
Liberty Park is on the left.

Batesville Liberty Park
Batesville Liberty Park

Continue same direction down Park Ave. Turn left on Pohlman Street
Turn right of Delaware.
The Brum Woods is on the left.
Continue south on Delaware Road about four miles, turn left on 1100 N.
About 1.25 miles to Ertles Winery. You will cross State Road 129

Batesville Auto Tour - Ertle Winery
Batesville Auto Tour - Ertle Winery

Continue east on 1100 N. About 1.35 miles to "T" with 500 E. Turn left.
Go 3 miles north on 500 E.
The town to the left is Morris, IN. Turn right on Morris Mill Street and go under the underpass for Railroad
Turn left on Indiana State Road 46.
About two miles on right is East Bowl and Lefty’s Pub.


Batesville Auto Tour - Lefty's Pub
Batesville Auto Tour - Lefty's Pub


Drive another .34 miles to Weberdings Carving Shop.

Batesville Auto Tour - Weberdings Carving Shop
Batesville Auto Tour - Weberdings Carving Shop

Continue one mile to stop light at Indiana State Road 229. Turn Right and cross Interstate 74. A lot of fast food, Hampton Inn and Comfort Inn is out here. Also Kroger, Pamida and other shopping.
Continue on Indiana State Road 229 about 2.25 miles from the Interstate to County Road 700 S (Pocket Road). Turn left.
About .5 miles on left is Cricket Ridge Restaurant & Public Golf Course.

Batesville Auto Tour - Cricket Ridge
Batesville Auto Tour - Cricket Ridge

Continue on Pocket Road about one mile to "T" with 900W. Turn left.
Continue about .64 miles to Sawmill Road. Turn left.
You are now on Water Street in Oldenburg.
Turn right on the next intersection on Main Street/Indiana State Road 229.
Go around the bend in the highway. Michaela Farm Barn Store is on the right.


Batesville Auto Tour - Micheala Farms
Batesville Auto Tour - Micheala Farms


Turn left on Vine Street.
The third street is Sycamore Street. Turn left.
Just before the bridge is Hamburg Road. Turn right.
About 1.82 miles you will reach Huntersville Road. Turn left
About 2.6 miles you will reach Indiana State Road 46. You will have crossed the Interstate.
Turn left.
About 1 mile you will reach Indiana State Road 229/Walnut Street. Turn right into Batesville. You will pass the Stonebridge Inn on the right.
Note - Currently Closed

Batesville Auto Tour - Stonebridge Inn
Batesville Auto Tour - Stonebridge Inn

When you reach the four way stop at Boehringer Street, turn left. The next intersection is Main Street. On the left is the Gibson Theatre.


Batesville Auto Tour - Gibson Theatre
Batesville Auto Tour - Gibson Theatre


Turn right.
Turn left at the next street, East Pearl. Go through the Shopping Village.
Romweber Marketplace is on the right.

Batesville Auto Tour - Romweber Marketplace
Batesville Auto Tour - Romweber Marketplace


One block and LiL' Charlie's Restaurant & Brewery is on the left.


Batesville Auto Tour - Lil' Charlies
Batesville Auto Tour - Lil' Charlies


Turn left on Eastern, then left on Boehringer, then left on Main.
This takes you back to your starting point at the Memorial Building.

Back to Batesville


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Thursday, June 9, 2011

Louisville and Indiana Railroad


Louisville and Indiana Railroad

The Louisville and Indiana Railroad operates 113 miles of rail in Indiana, primarily between Indianapolis and Louisville. It primarily carries Cement, chemicals, food products, grain, lumber, manufactured goods, paper, plastics, scrap and steel. The Louisville and Indiana crosses Floyd, Clark, Scott, Jackson, Bartholomew/, Johnson, and Marion counties.



Louisville and Indiana Railroad in Bartholomew County
Length - About 22 miles
The Louisville and Indiana Railroad enters Bartholomew County about .6 miles northeast of its intersection with Interstate 65 in Jackson County. It intersects Indiana State Road 46 in Columbus about 11.6 miles north of the county line after parelleling Indiana State Road 11 for much of the distance. About 3.1 miles north of this intersection the Louisville and Indiana Railroad crosses US Route 31 which it parallels for a distance. About 5 miles north of the intersection with US Route 31 the Louisville and Indiana Railroad crosses under Interstate 65. It leave Bartholomew County and enters Johnson County about 2.42 miles north of this intersection.

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Indiana Railroads

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Louisville and Indiana Railroad in Jackson County

Length - Aproximately 20 miles

The Louisville and Indiana Railroad enters Jackson County from Jefferson County in the south about two miles southeast of
Crothersville, Indiana. It intersects Indiana State Road 250 about 3.5 miles north of Crothersville. It intersects US Route 50 about 8 miles north of this point in Seymour where there is a transload facility in conjunction with the CSX Railroad which it also intersects with here. It exits Jackson County and enters Bartholomew County about 5.9 miles north of Seymour.

Indiana Railroads

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© Indiana Places 2011

Wednesday, June 8, 2011

Batesville Memorial Swimming Pool

Batesville Memorial Swimming Pool



Batesville Memorial Pool
108 North Mulberry Street
Batesville, IN 47006-1184
(812) 934-5520

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers &
Museums
South East Edition
Public swimming pool in Batesville, Indiana for adults and children. Swimming lessons in summer offered. The pool is across from the Middle School on Mulberry Street. Batesville Memorial Pool features and Olympic sized pool, water slides and concession stand. Enjoy the free wireless internet


© Indiana Places 2016

Tuesday, June 7, 2011

Batesville Fishing, and Boating and Hiking Spots

Batesville Fishing, Hiking and Boating Spots
There are a number of opportunities for the outdoor activities of boating, fishing and hiking in the Batesville area.
Bischoff Reservoir Boat Ramp


Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
South East Edition
Boating is permitted on Bischoff Reservoir. Motor size is limited to six horsepower. This ramp for the 200 acre lake is located on County Road 1400 North. Turn right (South) on Washington Street if coming from Batesville in Morris, Indiana off of Indiana State Road 46. Washington Street intersects County Road 1400 N at a "T". Turn right and the road ends in the lake. There is a boat ramp here.

Fishing is permitted, with an Indiana State Fishing License, at Bischoff Reservoir, as well as other public reservoirs. There are several access sites for bank fishing on Bischoff's Lake. Follow County Road 450 E south from County Road 1400 N. There are spots along this road. Turn right on County Road 1300 N. Then right of County Road 400 E. There are dead end roads here which end at the lake. Another spot for bank fishing can be found off Indiana State Road 129 1.2 miles south of its intersection with Indiana State Road 46 at County Road 1400 N.This is the dam and there is fishing here.

More fishing is available in Feller Reservoir, just south of Liberty Park on Delaware Road. Hahn and Osier Reservoirs are accessible from County Road 1400 N, Turn right off Delaware and both lakes are on the right. There are small parking lots for each. Small boats and canoes are permitted on these lakes. Trolling motors or oars only. Fishing is permitted also at the Canal in Liberty Park. No boats are permitted on this lake.
Brum Woods
Brum Woods


Hiking is available at Brum Woods. There is parking just off South Mulberry and another lot on Indiana State Road 229, just south of Batesville. There are a number of trails and a small flower garden. Hiking trail maps available at the park. You will find two to three miles of trails here. You may also hike around the Canal at Liberty Park, as there is a gravel path all around it.

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Ripley County Fishing

© Indiana Places 2011

Indiana State Road 250

Indiana State Road 250

Indiana State Road 250 begins at an intersection in Brownstown, Indiana and ends at the Ohio River in Patriot, Indiana at an intersection with Indiana State Road 56. It crosses, from west to east, Jackson, Jennings, Jefferson, and Switzerland Counties.



Indiana State Road 250 In Jackson County
Length - About 14.3 miles

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Indiana State Road 250 begins in Brownstown Indiana at an intersection with US Route 50. About 2.5 miles east Indiana State Road 39 branches off. About 5.8 miles east of this intersection, Indiana State Road 11 branches of north. About 4.5 miles further east Indiana State Road 250 intersects US Route 31, then Interstate 65 at Exit 41. About 1 mile further east, Indiana State Road 250 leaves Jackson County and enters Jennings County.

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Indiana State Road 250 In Jefferson County
There are two sections of Indiana State Road 250 in Jefferson County, a western section and an eastern section.
Length Western Section - About 7.9 Miles
Length Eastern Section - About 12.2 Miles
The western section of Indiana State Road 250 enters Jefferson County about 11 miles from its intersection with Interstate 65 in Scott County. The western section ends about 7.9 miles from the county line at an intersection with Indiana State Road 7.
The eastern section of Indiana State Road 250 begins at an intersection with US Route 421 near Big Oaks National Wildlife Area. About 1.9 miles east it intersects Indiana State Road 62 which it follows for about 7.4 miles. Indiana State Road 250 exits Jefferson County and enters Switzerland County about 2.9 miles east of this intersection.


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Indiana State Road 250 In Switzerland County
Length - About 23 Miles
Indiana State Road 250 enters Switzerland County from Jefferson County about one mile west of its intersection with Indiana State Road 129 at Mount Pleasant, Indiana. About ten miles from this intersection Indiana State Road 250 intersects Indiana State Road 56 at East Enterprise Indiana. About 4.7 miles after this intersection Indiana State Road 250 passes through Quercus Grove, Indiana and about 2 miles further east it bissects Antioch, Indiana. About 1.5 miles further it intersects the Searcy Ridge Road at Searcy Crossroads. Indiana State Road 250 ends about 2.5 miles east in Patriot, Indiana where it is also Third Street, at an intersection with Indiana State Road 156.

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© Indiana Places 2011

Monday, June 6, 2011

Indiana State Road 39

Indiana State Road 39

Indiana State Road 39 has two sections, a southern section which begins in Washington County and ends in Jackson County. There is a much longer section which begins in Martinsville, Indiana and travels to the Michigan State Line.



Indiana State Road 39 in Jackson County

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Indiana State Road 39 enters Jackson County from Washington County about 9.5 miles south of it's intersection with Indiana State Road 250. It ends about 2.5 miles northwest at an intersection with US Route 50 in Brownstown, Indiana.

© Indiana Places 2011

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