Wednesday, March 31, 2010

Pigeon Roost Memorial

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Pigeon Roost Memorial
US 31
Underwood IN 47177




The Pigeon Roost Memorial is located five miles south of Scottsburg, Indiana on US 31. The memorial marks the spot of a massacre which occurred at Pigeon Roost in 1812 as part of the hostilities of the War of 1812. Pigeon Roost was established in 1809. The settlement was attacked by Indians on September 3, 1812. Over twenty settlers were killed.

The Pigeon Roost Memorial was dedicated on October 1, 1904 and became a state historic site in 1929.

Back to Scott County

Tuesday, March 30, 2010

Hardy Lake and Campgrounds

[googlemaps https://maps.google.com/maps?q=5620+N+Hardy+Lake+Rd,+Scottsburg,+Scott,+Indiana+47170&ie=UTF8&hl=en&cd=1&geocode=FfCuTwIdeTvk-g&split=0&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=23.875,57.630033&hq=&hnear=5620+N+Hardy+Lake+Rd,+Scottsburg,+Scott,+Indiana+47170&z=16&ll=38.77656,-85.705863&output=embed&w=425&h=350]

Hardy Lake and Campgrounds
4171 E. Harrod Road
Scottsburg, IN 47170
(812) 794-3800

Mapping address:
5620 North Hardy Lake Road
Scottsburg, IN 47170-8438




Activities and Facilities Availble at Hardy Lake:
Archery Range
Basketball Courts
Open Playfield
Volleyball Courts
Boating / 4 Launch Ramps
Fishing / Ice Fishing
Fishing Pier
Hiking Trails
Hunting
Interpretive Services
Picnicking / Shelterhouse
Playgrounds
Rental - Rowboat
Swimming / Beach (Policy)
Waterskiing

Camping Facilities:
Electric / 149 sites - Shale Bluff
Primitive / 18 sites - Wooster
Dumping Station

Hardy Lake has a total of 2,120 acres with a 741 acre lake for fishing, boating and swimming. There are several hiking trails, including an archery trail which may be used to sharpen your archery skills. The lake provides habitat for many species of birds. Red-necked Grebe, Mute Swan, Snow Goose, and Black Vulture. Red-shouldered Hawks as well as many others have been sighted here.

Back to Scott County

Back to Indiana State Parks

© Indiana Places 2011

Monday, March 29, 2010

Scott County Museum and Heritage Center

[googlemaps https://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=1050+South+Main+Street+scottsburg+in&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=37.819897,106.787109&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=1050+S+Main+St,+Scottsburg,+Scott,+Indiana+47170&z=16&ll=38.673241,-85.770681&output=embed&w=425&h=350]

Scott County Museum and Heritage Center
1050 South Main Street
Scottsburg IN 47170
812-752-1050




Visitors to the Scott County Museum and Heritage Center will enjoy many artifacts and the building itself which had been once a working farm for people who had not place else to live.

Back to Scott County

© Indiana Places 2011

Thursday, March 25, 2010

Lone Star Ranch Bed and Breakfast

[googlemaps https://maps.google.com/maps?q=419+Percy+King+Rd,+Borden,+Clark,+Indiana+47106&ie=UTF8&hl=en&cd=1&geocode=FVk2SwIdL5Di-g&split=0&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=23.875,57.630033&hq=&hnear=419+Percy+King+Rd,+Borden,+Clark,+Indiana+47106&z=16&ll=38.483545,-85.815249&output=embed&w=425&h=350]

Lone Star Ranch Bed & Breakfast
419 Percy King Rd.
Borden, IN 47106
(502) 693-7617




If you like riding and watching horses, this bed and breakfast is for you. A herd of Spanish Mustangs is maintained at the Ranch. Guided trail rides of various lengths can be taken. If you want to stay a few days, then you can stay in the bed and breakfast inn located on the property.

Back to Borden

Tuesday, March 23, 2010

Wooded View Golf Course


Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition


Wooded View Golf Course
Wooded View Golf Course has 18 holes and is in a woods, where it gets its name. Call for tee times and more information.
2404 Greentree Boulevard
Clarksville, Indiana
(812) 283-9274

Monday, March 22, 2010

Twilight Golf Course

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,  Markers & Museums -  South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums -
South East Edition
Twilight Golf Course

Twilight Golf Course is a nine hole course which is ideal for beginning golfers, or advanced golfers who may want a quick game. Each hole averages 150 yards and most are par 3.

Twilight Golf Course
5316 US Highway 62
Jeffersonville IN
 (812) 288-8871
© Indiana Places 2016

Thursday, March 18, 2010

Hidden Creek Golf Course


Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
 South East Edition
Hidden Creek Course

The Hidden Creek Course boasts all Zoysia fairways, a beautiful 5 acre lake, remodeled pro shop, relaxing lounge complete with large flat screen T.V.’s and snack bar area. The Turning Point course is a links style course which provides multiple tee options and is a certified PGA Family course ideal for those wanting to get in a quick 9 holes, or for beginners and juniors.

Hidden Creek Golf Course
4975 Utica/Sellersburg Road
Sellersburg, Indiana
(812) 822-2552

© Indiana Places 2017

Wednesday, March 17, 2010

Jackson State Forest Back Country Trail

[caption id="attachment_635" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Jackson State Forest Back Country Trail"]Jackson State Forest Back Country Trail[/caption]


We hiked the Jackson State Forest Backcountry Trail at Jackson Washington State Forest, near Brownstown, Indiana. This is a lengthy trail of eight miles which is located in a fairly out of the way spot in southern Indiana. To get there, go to Brownstown, which is located on US 50, east of Bedford and west of Seymour, Indiana. Take State Road 135 south thirteen miles to Rooster Hill Road. Turn left and after twisting 2.3 miles on this road, it dead ends into Delaney Park Road. Turn right and drive .7 miles. The Spurgeon Lake turnoff is on the left and the trail head is located here. The lane back is sort of interesting, so take it slow. Very slow.

The lake is a popular fishing spot, so there will usually be quite a few cars there on a weekend. I will be writing a bit more about this trail and about Jackson State Forest in the days ahead.




Once you arrive at Spurgeon Lake you are ready to hike the trail. Since this is a fairly long hike by our standards, we usually take two liters of water and a backpack full of trail food. It is eight miles long, and usually consumes around four to five hours for us.

I usually carry the water, two bottles strapped to my waist, my wife takes the backpack of food. I also carry my camera, extra batteries and a pedometer.

The trailhead is to the left of the boat ramp and is marked with a sign. The first part along Spurgeon Lake can be somewhat muddy in places, especially in the spring. But the lake is pretty and the vegetation is lush now with many different types of ferns and jewelweed which is preparing for its summer show of color.

After you have hiked about a quarter of a mile you will reach the junction of the trail where the north (upper) trail branches off from the south (lower) trail. We always take the north loop towards the Jackson State Forest Delaney Trailhead first. The beginning is a pretty steep ascent up the face of the knob and we like to hike this on fresh legs. The lower trail is a fairly level downstream hike along Spurgeon Creek and is a good way to finish the trail when you are tiring.


So here we turn left, and almost immediately begin to climb. As mentioned earlier this is pretty steep and fairly long. The trail winds its way up the knob. At the top, there is a spur to the left to an overlook. This is a good view in the fall or very early spring of the surrounding countryside. As the leaves are now on the trees, the view is blocked so we don’t go that way, opting to travel right.

Once you reach the top of the knob, it is pretty level hiking for the next mile or so. You will pass a small wildlife pond on the right, a good place to see frogs and tadpoles as well as a nice variety of aquatic insects.

Multi-flora rose scents the trail here as we pass along. The forest canopy is thin here, sunlight dapples the ground. Earlier in the year, or in the autumn, a nice view of the surrounding countryside is afforded by the height of the knob.

After another a half hour or so of hiking a fork in the trail is reached. The trail which branches off to the right is a shortcut which will take several miles off the hike. This may be recommended in extremely wet weather, as the creek further on needs to be forded and may be too high. We have never taken the shortcut, so I know nothing about it.

Instead, we elect to take the longer route toward the Delaney Trailhead. So here we turn left and head downhill.

The trail falls and curls to the north, passes the Jackson State Forest Delaney trailhead which enters from the left. Our route lays to the right. The trail crosses a creek, then follows it for a half mile or so. This is a very pretty section of the hike. Then up again, climbing steeply to the top of another knob. The high areas of the knob are dominated by chestnut oak, red oak, sugar maple, hickory and sassafras trees. The air is alternately perfumed by multi-flora rose and pine, which are present in some stretches of the trail.

The trail again falls, re-crosses the creek and again climbs. On this section two meadow areas are present as you hike along a fire road. The open areas are loaded with summer blooming wildflowers, multi-flora rose and other sun loving plants.

During this stretch we ran into an interesting fellow on a hike with his two young daughters. We chatted a bit about the area, the trail and wildlife inhabiting the area. He lives nearby, hikes this trail fairly often. He hunts, fishes and traps. The fur from the animals he traps he doesn’t sell, using it instead for his own use, or making products to sell. He was wearing a buckskin shirt, which was quite nice. It had beadwork of his own design on each shoulder. The beadwork is done using seed beads, each individually stitched into place. He mentioned that beaver are fairly common in the area, and are good eating. The tail is the best, consisting of a very dark, tender meat. He has caught river otter in his traps twice, accidentally. These animals are very tough to release when caught. They are large, aggressive and very active. He managed to release one, accidentally killed the other. The otter were released by the Department of Natural Resources in Muscatatuck National Wildlife Area and have followed the river down. They now inhabit the river and all its tributaries.

After bidding farewell to our friend, we continued the hike. It turns right, descends one last time. Spurgeon Creek is first on the right. This is the last leg of the trail and it is simply wonderful. Large sycamore trees tower over the rocky bedded creek. The knobs tower over the creek on both sides and the floodplain of the creek is lush with ferns and other wild plants.

A final crossing of Spurgeon Creek, and there is about a mile left.

We finally finished the trail around 5:45 PM, the pedometer indicates about eight miles. This is one of the best trails at Jackson State Forest.

Back To Jackson-Washington State Forest

Jackson State Trail 1 - Hike To Pinnacle Peak

[caption id="attachment_632" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Jackson State Trail 1 - Hike To Pinnacle Peak"]Jackson State Trail 1 - Hike To Pinnacle Peak[/caption]

The Hike To Pinnacle Peak

The most popular destination hike at Jackson State Forest is the one mile hike up to Pinnacle Peak. At 966 feet above sea level, this is the second highest spot in the park. For this trail you will want some good hiking shoes. Sandals, flip flops and dress shoes are not at all suitable as this trail is pretty rugged. It is wide, well marked, and has a good surface most of the way, but there is a lot of climbing and descending. It is a challenging trail.

Trail One is the trail which leads up to this spot, the trailhead is from the Pinnacle Peak parking area, at the northeast end of the park. Just follow the Main Forest Road all the way back, park on the left. The Jackson State Forest Pinnacle Peak Shelter House is located just a little further on, a great place for a family reunion or gathering. There is a playground, primitive campground, fishing in Knob Lake, and lots of other trails here, too, so it is a good place to spend the day.




The trail begins by climbing rather steeply to the Old Tower Site, the first landmark along the trail. An old fire tower was here at one time, some of the old concrete supports still protruding from the ground. At this point, you will want to take the left fork, the right travels over to High Point, about one quarter mile distant.

The left fork descends rather sharply, be careful as this section is somewhat gravelly and slippery even when the ground is dry. The trail climbs again, drops and then climbs. You will then meet Trail 10 coming in from the left. A short distance later Trail 10 departs to the east, Trail One continues on up a grade and around the hill.

You will finally reach a point where you will see two posts with what looks like the trail going between them. You can get up to Pinnacle Peak this way, but the trail actually goes left. If you go straight here, you will be climbing up a fairly vertical, gravelly cliff. The left fork is longer, but much easier.

The trail from this point climbs fairly steadily, curves around behind the Peak, finally emerges for one last scramble up a gravelly path to the top. Once up there, there are two main vistas. The main vista overlooks the trail you just came up. To the right an awesome view of the surrounding countryside, to the left more hills of the park. Straight ahead is High Point. The other vista is smaller, but impressive views of the neighboring hills. An interesting Chestnut Oak provides a low limb to sit and look. There are some nice flat rocks to lie on, and there is a bench to sit on also. It is a good place to bring a picnic lunch along to munch as you contemplate the view.

Pinnacle Peak Trail basically passes through a forest mostly composed of Chestnut Oak, Sugar Maple and other high country hardwoods. Wildflowers abound in the spring. The 300 odd foot climb passes through some very pretty forest, along ridges and divides as it ascends to its destination, Pinnacle Peak. This is one of Jackson State Forests best hikes.

Back To Jackson-Washington State Forest

Jackson State Trail 4 - Wheel Chair Accessable Trail

[caption id="attachment_628" align="alignleft" width="300" caption="Jackson State Trail 4 - Wheel Chair Accessable Trail"]Jackson State Trail 4 - Wheel Chair Accessable Trail[/caption]

Hiking For The Handicapped

Trail 4 at Jackson State Forest is a wheelchair friendly nature trail. It is three quarters of a mile long, the first one fourth mile is a wheel chair accessible trail which is wide, graveled and has gentle slopes ideal for the handicapped to enjoy.

There are several bridges which are wide, sturdy structures which cross low areas and ditches. This trail doubles as a Jackson State Forest Tree Identification Trail. A brochure is available at the trailhead which is right across from the property office near the entrance on the Main Forest Road. Some of the trees are identified from the handicap portion, the remainder on the rest of the trail. Altogether there are thirty three trees identified in the brochure at various marked stations along the trail, including Paw Paw, Blue Beech, Chestnut Oak and Dogwood.


This is a nice, easy woodland stroll. The trail forms a loop with an additional entrance near the Jackson State Forest Knob Lake dam on the north end of the trail. The return parallels the Main Forest Road back to the trailhead at the Forest Office.




The trail is a good way for the handicapped to enjoy nature. The trail passes through some very pretty forest with some big trees. Nearby there is a wheel chair friendly fishing site and picnic area complete with a charcoal grill.

Back To Jackson-Washington State Forest

Jackson State Forest Hiking Trails

[caption id="attachment_625" align="alignleft" width="225" caption="Jackson State Forest Hiking Trails"]Jackson State Forest Hiking Trails[/caption]There are seven hiking trails at Jackson State Forest which total about nine miles. The trail descriptions are not meant to take the place of a map, nor are they meant to be detailed trail descriptions. Trail maps are available free at the entrance stations.

Trail 1
1.0 miles
Rugged
This trail begins at the CCC picnic and camping area at the north end of the drive. Parking is on the left, the trailhead is to the right. The trail ascends the knob up to Jackson State Forest Pinnacle Peak, altitude 966 feet. There is an overlook at the top, the last hundred yards or so a fairly steep scramble over a gravelly rock strewn area. At the top is a good climbing tree, but be careful here as it is a long way to fall down. The trail is pretty steep in places and is a good workout. Allow about an hour to hike this one. For more information about this trail, click here.




Trail 2
1.75 miles
Rugged
This is not a loop, you must either turn around or go back the way you came, return on Trail 3 to make a loop, or hike the road back to the beginning, where your car will be. It is fairly rugged with a 360 foot climb from the restroom in the CCC campground and picnic area on the north end of the park to High Point, which has an altitude of 985 feet. This is the highest point in Jackson State Forest. Allow at least two hours for this one. There is a connecting trail from Trail 1 at the Old Tower Site which runs east towards Trail 2. Once at the top the trail does some alternate climbing and ascending with one stretch of pretty steep descent with loose gravel underfoot. There are a couple of overlooks on top of the knobs, some pretty impressive oak and other trees. This is a good trail, but not for the squeamish.

Trail 3
1.0 miles
2.0 Moderate
The trailhead for this trail is near the north end of Knob Lake. Or you can start at the CCC barn near the youth camping area. This trail is not a loop, so you will need to return via the park road or make a loop out of it using Trail 2. Trail 3 provides some nice views of Knob Lake in the autumn when the leave thin out.

Trail 4
.75 miles
Easy
This trail is wide, graveled and easy. It is wheel chair accessible for one quarter mile and the rest is an easy hike. It doubles as a Tree Identification Trail with a brochure available at the Park Office. This one is a loop, starting and ending at the gatehouse near the park office. For more information, click this link


Trail 5
.25 miles
Easy
This trail begins by crossing a bridge at the north end of Jackson State Forest Knob Lake. It is primarily a fishin’ trail, but is a nice easy after lunch hike, too.

Trail 6
1.75 miles
Moderate
Trail 6 is a loop trail which provides access Lake Pyoca for the fishermen. It is also a good hiking trail which can extend a loop involving Trail 10. This is the forest interpretive trail at the State Forest. There are twenty stations, explained by a brochure available at the state forest office. Expand you knowledge of the forest by using the educational purpose of this trail. Or just enjoy a pleasant hike through a beautiful forest.

Trail 10
3.0 miles
Moderate
The trailhead for this trail is just west of the damn of Knob Lake, or you can also access it near the park office from Trail 6. From the trailhead near the lake, it is a pretty steady ascent before reaching the top of the knob. This is a fairly long trail requiring at least two to three hours to hike. There are some impressive trees on this one, as well as some wildlife areas.

A pretty good loop of the whole of the Jackson State Forest facility here can be hiked using Trail 10, Trail 2 and Trail 1. This would be a fairly ambitious day hike through some pretty rugged woodland.

There are three more trails available at nearby Skyline Drive totaling 9.6 miles

Back To Jackson-Washington State Forest

Hoosier Hills Golf Course

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
 South East Edition
Hoosier Hills Golf Course
Public Golf Course
Hoosier Hills Golf Course was expanded to a full eighteen holes in 2001. The greens are undulating and well bunkered, and fairways have plenty of trees that can alter your shots. In addition, three fairway bunkers have been strategically placed around the course. Locals claim this to be an excellent course for the beginning to intermediate player. Water hazards come into play on six holes. The course has a variety of discount rates available; check with the pro shop for more information.
Hoosier Hills Golf Course
17130 SR 60
Borden, Indiana
(812) 967-5050
http://hoosierhillsgolfcourse.com
© Indiana Places 2016

Tuesday, March 16, 2010

Covered Bridge Golf Club


Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
 South East Edition
Covered Bridge Golf Club

The Covered Bridge Golf Club is located near the famous Indiana landmarks, Floyd's Knobs. The eighteen hole golf course was designed by PGA great Fuzzy Zoeller.

Covered Bridge Golf Club
12510 Covered Bridge Road
Sellersburg, IN 47172
© Indiana Places 2012

Monday, March 15, 2010

Bogey Driving Range

[googlemaps https://maps.google.com/maps?f=q&source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=17130+SR+60+borden+indiana&sll=37.0625,-95.677068&sspn=37.819897,106.787109&ie=UTF8&hq=&hnear=17130+State+Road+60,+Borden,+Clark,+Indiana+47106&z=16&ll=38.454398,-85.892609&output=embed&w=425&h=350]




Bogey Driving Range
17130 SR 60
Borden, Indiana
(812) 246-3063
Bogey Driving Range

Back to Borden

Wednesday, March 10, 2010

Deam Lake State Recreation Area

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
 South East Edition
Deam Lake State Recreation Area
Deam Lake is a 194-acre lake. Named after Charles C. Deam, the facility has a swimming beach with shower and bathhouse facilities, a handicap ramp and a food concession stand. There is lake access for boating via a boat ramp. Motor boats are limited to the use of an electric trolling motor. Rowboat rentals are available during the summer season.
Charles Deam (August 30, 1865 - May 29, 1953)
Charles Deam entered life on a farm near Bluffton in Wells County, Indiana. His father taught him about plants as he grew up, spurring his lifelong interest in botany. He attended DePauw University, but had to leave after his second year because he could not afford the tuition. He got a job as clerk in a pharmacy where the long hours led to exhaustion and high stress. His doctor recommended long walks in the forest to relieve the stress. On these walks, Deam studied the plants and collected specimens. His interest and collection grew and his collection soared to over 78,000 plants. Indiana University acquired his plant collection and Deam joined the Academy of Sciences in Indiana. Indiana Governor Harold W. Handley became aware of Deam’s work and appointed him as Indiana's first State Forester in 1909. He moved to Clark State Forest to create an experimental forest laboratory. It was at his insistence that the State add an additional 2000 acres to the park. His work had lasting consequences on forestry in Indiana and visitors can still see many of his experimental plantings. The Charles C. Deam Wilderness and Deam Lake State Recreation Area are named in his honor.
Multi-Use Facility
The Indiana Department of Natural Resources has classified Deam Lake as a multi-use property. This means that a multitude of outdoor activities can be going on at the same time. These activities include swimming, hiking, hunting, horseback riding, boating, picnicking, fishing and camping. There are designated hunting areas in the facility, away from the other recreational activities. A visit to this Indiana State place is rich with outdoor experiences.
Hiking Trails
There are a number of different kinds of forest trails at Deam Lake. The four hiking trails cover a variety of terrain and total almost seven miles. There are almost eighty miles of horse trails and five miles of mountain bike trails.
Camping
Camping facilities include a horseman's camp and 116 Class A campsites. Class "A" facilities include electrical hookup, modern restrooms/showers (at least one shower station wheelchair accessible), picnic table, fire ring and parking spur. Drinking water and a dump station are also available in the area.
Picnicking
There are several picnic areas located around the facility, many with shelters. This southern Indiana Park is a great place to visit.
Deam Lake State Recreation Area
1217 Deam Lake Road
Borden, IN 47106
(812) 246-5421

Monday, March 8, 2010

Charlestown State Park

Charlestown State Park

Overview of Charlestown State Park
Charlestown State Park has fantastic hiking along the Ohio River and Fourteen Mile Creek. There are over seventy-two different species of birds here, including Bald Eagles and bluebirds. The 200-site campground offers campers a wonderful, relaxing camping experience among the trees.
Charlestown State Park
Charlestown State Park



Charlestown State Park occupies a part of the Indiana Army Ammunition Plant. Some of the abandoned facilities of are still located in the park. The Indiana Ammunition Plant originated during World War 2. Construction completed May 31, 1942 with production of ammunition beginning in April. The Indiana Ammunition Plant manufactured three types of ammunition at the plant. These were propellant charge bags, rocket propellant and smokeless powder. The plant supplied materials for the war effort and later for the Korean War and other conflicts.
All three plants ceased operation by 1992. The company ceded 4,500 acres of the property to the State of Indiana for use as a state park. Final demolition of the building on the site should occur by December 31, 2014.
The Fourteen Mile Creek area is the site of a former amusement park called Rose Island. The park had a zoo, pony rides, merry-go-round, Ferris wheel, roller coaster, shooting gallery, cafeteria, swimming pool, and more. In reality, the park was not on an island, but a peninsula that people could access only by steamboat, bridge or ferry. Portersville Bridge, moved from Dubois County, allows visitors access to the old amusement park site via Trail 3 and 7. Interpretive signage and some displays should be finished in 2014.

Camping
Full Hookup / 60 sites
Electric / 132 sites
The campground has with flush toilets, hot water and showers. Occupancy limited to 14 consecutive nights. All of the camping sites have electricity and will accommodate trailers. Dump and water-filling stations are available. Accessible sites include a walkway to the comfort stations. Charlestown is one of two state parks offering full hookup campsites.

Hiking
The seven trails at Charlestown State Park provide over twelve miles of hiking experience. The trail ratings range between rugged to moderate, with Trail 7 to Rose Island rated Easy. Many have scenic views of Fourteenmile Creek.

Ohio River Boating Access
Charlestown Landing provides boaters with access to the Ohio River.

Fishing
Anglers with Indiana State Fishing Licenses may bank fish in the Ohio River from the area north of Rose Island. Access this area from Trails 7 and 3.

Picnicking

Visitors to the park will find three shelters on two picnic areas in the park. There are many other picnic tables scattered around the park.

P.O. Box 38
CharlestownIN 47111
812-256-5600

Mapping Address:
Charlestown State Park
12500 Indiana 62 
CharlestownIN 47111

Friday, March 5, 2010

Colgate Clock - Clarksville, Indiana

Colgate Clock - Clarksville, Indiana
Colgate Clock - Clarksville, Indiana


Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
 South East Edition
Colgate Clock
1410 S Clark Blvd
Clarksville, IN 47129

The Colgate Clock is the second largest timepiece in the world, exceeding London's Big Ben. Measuring forty feet in diameter with hands of sixteen and twenty and a half feet respectively, the Colgate Clock has been a major Southern Indiana landmark for nearly seven decades, since it was first illuminated on November 17, 1924. City authorities used 1,607 bulbs outlining the letters, hands and hour marks. The bulbs' output totaled 28,000 watts.
The clock is easily discernible from across the Ohio River in Louisville, KY. The Colgate Clock sits atop the former Colgate Palmolive factory in Clarksville that occupies a former prison called the Indiana Reformatory South. Colgate Palmolive purchased the building in 1921 after a fire damaged the building. The State of Indiana moved the prison to Pendleton, Indiana. The Colgate Palmolive Company moved the clock from Jersey City, NJ in 1924. The Colgate Clock is a Seth Thomas masterpiece designed by Colgate engineer Warren Day in 1906. The clock still keeps time and the neon lights still illuminate it by night, even though Colgate Palmolive no longer uses the building.
The clock is a movie star, as it appears in the movie The Insider.

© Indiana Places 2016

Thursday, March 4, 2010

Cinemark's Green Tree 10 - Clarksville Indiana

[googlemaps https://maps.google.com/maps?source=s_q&hl=en&geocode=&q=757-A+Highway+131&sll=37.926868,-95.712891&sspn=37.073071,79.013672&ie=UTF8&hq=757-A+Highway+131&hnear=Clarksville,+IN&ll=38.350003,-85.746918&spn=0.151934,0.308647&z=12&iwloc=A&cid=10518935849648769180&output=embed&w=425&h=350]

Cinemark's Green Tree 10
757-A Highway 131
Clarksville, Indiana
(812) 284-1603

Cinemark's Green Tree 10 is a ten screen movie theater in Clarksville which shows current movie offerings.


Cinemark's Green Tree 10 is a ten screen movie theater in Clarksville which shows current movie offerings.

Back To Clarksville, Indiana

© Indiana Places 2012

Wednesday, March 3, 2010

Clarksville Little Theater

Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites, Markers & Museums - South East Edition
Exploring Indiana's Historic Sites,
Markers & Museums
 South East Edition
Clarksville Little Theater
Clarksville Little Theater has its beginnings in a vision of Clarksville resident Mr. Julius Obermiller. With the help of Clarksville Optimist Club, the George Rogers Clark Parent-Teacher Association and others, Mr. Obermiller staged a musical production in 1947. The first plays took place in the George Rogers Clark School gym. The group moved its plays to the Clarksville Optimist Club, using a portable stage. Members of the troupe stored the stage in their garages when the play was not in production. In 1951 a committee formed for the purpose raised money to buy land and build a theater. The Clarksville Little Theater has operated at that location ever since, holding several productions a year.
To visit this entertaining place in Indiana, you will find it is not far from Interstate 65, near Colgate Park in Clarksville Indiana.
Clarksville Little Theater
301 E. Montgomery Ave.
Clarksville, IN 47129
812-283-6522
http://www.clarksvillelittletheatre.org/theatre-history/
© Indiana Places 2016